Brian Mann
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Stories By

Brian Mann

Nancie Battaglia/NPR
Headshot of Brian Mann
Nancie Battaglia/NPR

Brian Mann

Correspondent, National Desk

Brian Mann is NPR's first national addiction correspondent. He also covers breaking news in the U.S. and around the world.

Mann began covering drug policy and the opioid crisis as part of a partnership between NPR and North Country Public Radio in New York. After joining NPR full time in 2020, Mann was one of the first national journalists to track the deadly spread of the synthetic opioid fentanyl, reporting from California and Washington state to West Virginia.

After losing his father and stepbrother to substance abuse, Mann's reporting breaks down the stigma surrounding addiction and creates a factual basis for the ongoing national discussion.

Mann has also served on NPR teams covering the Beijing Winter Olympics and the war in Ukraine.

During a career in public radio that began in the 1980s, Mann has won numerous regional and national Edward R. Murrow awards. He is author of a 2006 book about small town politics called Welcome to the Homeland, described by The Atlantic as "one of the best books to date on the putative-red-blue divide."

Mann grew up in Alaska and is now based in New York's Adirondack Mountains. His audio postcards, broadcast on NPR, describe his backcountry trips into wild places around the world.

Story Archive

Saturday

Jury finds NRA executives including head Wayne LaPierre liable for corruption

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Drug-related street crime in Portugal has dropped along with overdoses. "There's an impression in the U.S. that if you decriminalize drugs, it's a wild west," said Miguel Moniz at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon. "That hasn't been the case in Portugal." Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

Friday

Letitia James promised to "take on" then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

N.Y.'s crusading attorney general wins again with NRA verdict, Trump judgment

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Jury finds three top executives of the NRA liable for corruption

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Former NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre (second from right) leaves New York State Supreme Court on Wednesday. Top NRA executives for were accused of using millions in donations for private luxuries. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Friday

People in Kansas City, especially in the Hispanic community, adored Lisa Lopez-Galvan

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Tuesday

Municipal Police inspect the underpass that is known to have drug consumption activity in Porto, Portugal on Monday, June 5, 2023. On a daily bases city municipal workers and officers of the Municipal Police walk the paths and areas used by drug consumers to remove used syringes to reduce injury and the spread of diseases such as HIV and Hepatitis. Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Portugal's Success Combating its Opioid Crisis

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Portugal's approach to the opioid epidemic is a flashpoint in U.S. fentanyl debate

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How Portugal got the number of fatal overdoses in the country to drop 80%

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Friday

A liquid dose of methadone at the clinic in Rossville, Ga. The medication is only available at designated opioid treatment centers and that won't change. But more clinicians will be able to prescribe it. Kevin D. Liles/AP hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles/AP

Wednesday

Following Russian doping decision, the U.S. has 9 new Olympic gold medalists

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Tuesday

Nathan Chen competes at the 2022 Winter Olympics, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022, in Beijing. Chen and the rest of Team USA are now gold medal winners in the team event following a doping decision against Russian Kamila Valieva. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Monday

Kamila Valieva, of the Russian Olympic Committee, trains at the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson) Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Sports tribunal bans Russian Kamila Valieva from figure skating through 2025

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Saturday

Former Presidents Bill Clinton and Donald Trump were friendly with and traveled with Jeffrey Epstein during years when he allegedly victimized women. Both say they had no knowledge of Epstein's behavior. One alleged victim says Epstein's powerful acquaintances "had to be blind" not to know. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Sunday

Saturday

Joshua Powell, a former top executive at the NRA, is pictured. Powell has admitted wrongdoing and agreed to pay $100,000 ahead of a civil corruption trial. The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post via Getty Images

Thursday

This March 28, 2017, image provided by the New York State Sex Offender Registry shows Jeffrey Epstein. New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP hide caption

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New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP

Court documents reveal names of powerful men allegedly linked to Jeffrey Epstein

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Unsealed court documents reveal names of men allegedly linked to Jeffrey Epstein

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Wednesday

Corruption trial could lead to the end of NRA leader Wayne LaPierre's career

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Monday

Israelis protested against plans by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government to overhaul the judicial system and in support of the Supreme Court in Jerusalem on Monday, Sept. 11, 2023. (AP Photo/Ohad Zwigenberg) Ohad Zwigenberg/AP hide caption

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Ohad Zwigenberg/AP

In landmark ruling, Israel's Supreme Court rejects right-wing changes to judiciary

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Thursday

Matt Capelouto, whose daughter died from a fentanyl overdose, speaks at a news conference outside the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, April 18, 2023. Capelouto is among dozens of protesters who called on the Assembly to hear fentanyl-related bills as tension mounts over how to address the fentanyl crisis. (AP Photo/Tran Nguyen) Tran Nguyen/AP hide caption

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Tran Nguyen/AP

In 2023 fentanyl overdoses ravaged the U.S. and fueled a new culture war fight

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Wednesday

Saturday

South African naturalist Adam Welz traveled the world to understand how climate change is "weirding" ecosystems. One of his questions: How to stay hopeful in a warming world? Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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A naturalist finds hope despite climate change in an era he calls 'The End of Eden'

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Thursday

Hanan Barghouti, a Hamas supporter, was released from Israeli detention last month as part of a hostage-prisoner exchange. She believes support for Hamas is rising fast. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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As Israel fights to destroy Hamas, the group's popularity surges among Palestinians

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