Brian Mann
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Brian Mann

Anna Mable-Jones, age 56, lost a decade to cocaine addiction. Now she's a homeowner, she started a small business and says life is "awesome." Walter Ray Watson/NPR hide caption

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Walter Ray Watson/NPR

There is life after addiction. Most people recover

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While addiction is deadlier than ever, research shows most Americans heal

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Anna Hoffmann soars during the women's ski jumping competition for placement on the 2022 U.S. Olympic team at the Olympic Ski Jumping Complex on Dec. 25 in Lake Placid, N.Y. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

U.S. women's ski jumpers won't compete in the Beijing Olympics. They failed to qualify

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New York jury finds Teva Pharmaceuticals liable in the opioid crisis

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Activists participate in a candlelight vigil calling for an end to the nation's opioid addiction crisis at the Ellipse in Washington, D.C., in August 2017. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

More than a million Americans have died from overdoses during the opioid epidemic

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The 2022 sign that will be lit on top of a building on New Year's Eve is displayed in New York's Times Square earlier this month. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Americans fume as the pandemic scrambles New Year's Eve celebrations again

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New York officials warn of a rise in the number of kids being hospitalized for COVID

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul shortened the quarantine period for many essential workers even as infections have surged because of the omicron variant. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Bingham County, Idaho, Sheriff Craig Rowland faces criminal charges for allegedly aiming a pistol at members of a church youth group. Bingham County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bingham County Sheriff's Office

Judge rejects Purdue Pharma's opioid settlement that would protect Sackler family

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Judge overturns settlement that protected the Sackler family from opioid lawsuits

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How children who survived Kentucky's deadly tornadoes are coping with the aftermath

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Beatriz and Luis Valero, and their 8-year-old granddaughter Alayah Pacheco, stand in front of what's left of their home. The family says they lost everything in last week's tornado and hope to rebuild, but they had no homeowner's insurance. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

In Kentucky towns slammed by tornadoes, weary residents are picking up the pieces

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People in Kentucky are picking up the pieces in small towns hit by tornadoes

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Chief Geoffrey Deibler and dispatchers Meghan Collier (center) and Bobbie Brown of the Morganfield Police Department traveled to nearby Dawson Springs, Ky., to help look for survivors. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Kentucky crews search painstakingly for 109 people missing after deadly tornadoes

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