Rosemary Misdary Rosemary Misdary is a 2020-2021 Kroc Fellow.
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Rosemary Misdary

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People walk near the remains of burned homes after Hurricane Sandy in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City on Oct. 31, 2012. Over 50 homes were reportedly destroyed in a fire during the storm. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

NYC Public Schools, Mostly Remote During The Pandemic, Return To In-Class Learning

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This Mini Golf Course Reminds You About The Horrors Of Climate Change

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He Came To America Looking For Stardom — And Found It As A Waldorf-Astoria Bellhop

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Administrators Turn To Summer School To Address Pandemic Gaps

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Brittany Young, CEO and founder of the nonprofit B-360, speaks with a couple of people from the neighborhood, who heard the dirt bikes and came to the parking lot to ride themselves. André Chung for NPR hide caption

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André Chung for NPR

A Baltimore Youth Program Mixes A Passion For Dirt Bikes With Science

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Baltimore STEM Program Taps Into Students' Passion For Dirt Biking

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Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadawi received an honorary doctorate from the National Autonomus University of Mexico in 2010. The second of nine children born in a village just outside of Cairo, El Saadawi rejected patriarchy at a young age, stamping her feet in protest when her grandmother told her, "a boy is worth 15 girls at least ... girls are a blight." Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

Children climb a tree on the grounds of a school in La Rivera Hernandez, a neighborhood in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, that is notorious for high levels of violence in a city that has some of the highest homicide rates in the world. Danielle Villasana hide caption

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Danielle Villasana