Rosemary Misdary Rosemary Misdary is a 2020-2021 Kroc Fellow.
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Rosemary Misdary

Rosemary Misdary

Kroc Fellow

Rosemary Misdary is a 2020-2021 Kroc Fellow.

Before coming to NPR, she freelanced and interned at WNYC, where she covered the George Floyd protests and New York's phased reopening after lockdown for the news desk and worked on the podcast The Stakes. She was a reporter for the New York Post covering crime, courts, prisons, breaking news and the height of the pandemic at the city desk. She interned at the New York Daily News metro desk covering breaking news. She has also worked as a photographer in Egypt and South Africa.

Before becoming a journalist, Misdary was a civil engineer for over 10 years. She got her start designing roads for the DOT, but spent most of her career designing and managing the construction of mass transit and trackwork for the MTA.

Misdary has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and a master's degree in Journalism from the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

Story Archive

He Came To America Looking For Stardom — And Found It As A Waldorf-Astoria Bellhop

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Administrators Turn To Summer School To Address Pandemic Gaps

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Brittany Young, CEO and founder of the nonprofit B-360, speaks with a couple of people from the neighborhood, who heard the dirt bikes and came to the parking lot to ride themselves. André Chung for NPR hide caption

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André Chung for NPR

A Baltimore Youth Program Mixes A Passion For Dirt Bikes With Science

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Baltimore STEM Program Taps Into Students' Passion For Dirt Biking

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Egyptian activist Nawal El Saadawi received an honorary doctorate from the National Autonomus University of Mexico in 2010. The second of nine children born in a village just outside of Cairo, El Saadawi rejected patriarchy at a young age, stamping her feet in protest when her grandmother told her, "a boy is worth 15 girls at least ... girls are a blight." Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

Children climb a tree on the grounds of a school in La Rivera Hernandez, a neighborhood in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, that is notorious for high levels of violence in a city that has some of the highest homicide rates in the world. Danielle Villasana hide caption

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Danielle Villasana