Jeevika Verma
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Jeevika Verma

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Album cover for The First Time I Wore Hearing Aids. Ian Brennan hide caption

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Ian Brennan

Raymond Antrobus uses spoken word poetry to portray a diverse experience of sound

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Saeed Jones/Saeed Jones

Saeed Jones confronts the end of the world in new poems

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Nuar Alsadir Joseph Robert Krauss/Graywolf Press hide caption

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Joseph Robert Krauss/Graywolf Press

A book on laughter and how it brings out our most authentic selves

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While the U.S. military has used burn pits in other conflicts, one expert says they were exceptionally large in Iraq and Afghanistan. Scott Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Nelson/Getty Images

What is the legacy of burn pits? For some Iraqis, it's a lifetime of problems

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Migrants from Venezuela, who boarded a bus in Del Rio, Texas, disembark within view of the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

GOP governors sent buses of migrants to D.C. and NYC — with no plan for what's next

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Poet Alora Young. Sonya Smith/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Sonya Smith/Penguin Random House

In a new memoir in verse, Alora Young traces the lives of generations of Black women

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The dictionary aims to be the first to complete the task at this magnitude. Daniel Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Grill/Getty Images

A new dictionary will document the lexicon of African American English

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Aris Theotokatos/Penguin Random House

Safia Elhillo takes a leap in new poems, writes about shame and the body

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LaDonna Speiser has been working four days a week since February. She says she's not ready to give it up. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Green for NPR

More companies are trying out the 4-day workweek. But it might not be for everyone

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Poet Ryann Stevenson William Brewer hide caption

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William Brewer

In 'Human Resources,' a poet finds her voice by working on artificial intelligence

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