Marisa Peñaloza Marisa Peñaloza is a senior producer on the National Desk.

Robert Hartmann meets with his tutor, Sandy DeLuck, at the public library in Winterport, Maine. Hartmann reads at about a first-grade level. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Casting Aside Shame And Stigma, Adults Tackle Struggles With Literacy

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Carmen strikes a pose for her younger sister, Evelyn, before homecoming in the fall of 2017. Couresy of the Schentrup family hide caption

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Couresy of the Schentrup family

After Daughter's 'Unimaginable' Death, Parkland Family Moved To Action

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A man walks on Benning Road in Northeast Washington, D.C., in front of the Greater Northeast Medical Center, where Dr. Edwin Chapman works. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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The Opioid Crisis Is Surging In Black, Urban Communities

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Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Hurricane María's 150-mph winds destroyed the tropical rainforest's canopy and stripped trees bare. Scientists believe as many as one-fifth of the forest's trees may eventually die from the storm's effects. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Post-María, A Key Ecosystem In Puerto Rico Faces Slow Recovery

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Irma Rivera Aviles and her husband, Ivan Martínez, stand in front of their home last month. Rivera Aviles was ecstatic about the restoration of power to her neighborhood last Friday. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Irma Rivera Aviles and her husband Ivan Martínez live in a tight-knit working-class community called El Pueblito in Cataño. Their community flooded during Hurricane Maria leaving their house damaged with a hole in the roof. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'We Don't Feel Safe Here': Building A Post-Hurricane Life In Puerto Rico

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Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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Eric Elder, an Army reservist who came to Puerto Rico in early October to do power line work, says the work is challenging. "Every pole is different, every pole has to be looked at and dressed differently." Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

When Will Power Come Back To Puerto Rico? Depends Who You Ask

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Roberto Fret, 54, stands in the backyard of his damaged home. Hurricane Maria blew the roof off the house; the wind was so powerful that it twisted the metal roofing material and scattered pieces of it all over the yard. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Are Still In Shelters. Now What?

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Army Reserve troops have been distributing water and other supplies in Morovis since Hurricane Maria struck more than six weeks ago. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Frustration Mounts Over Puerto Rico's 'New Normal' As Federal Troops Leave The Island

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Together, José Ortíz (center left) and Ethan Leder (center right) — without the help of any major agency or aid organization — chartered a plane to Puerto Rico filled with donated medical supplies and get people with acute medical needs out of the island for treatment in the continental U.S. Courtesy of Willin Rodriguez hide caption

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Courtesy of Willin Rodriguez

Jose Rolon Rivera, 7, receives medication for his asthma at the San Jorge Children's Hospital in Puerto Rico. The hospital only has enough fuel to power its emergency generators until Saturday, an administrator says. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

In Puerto Rico, Relying On Luck And Enough Gas To Get Medical Care

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As in the rest of the country, growers in heavily agricultural northern Michigan rely overwhelmingly on migrant laborers to work the fields and orchards. Most of the pickers are from Mexico. Growers say it's just about impossible to find Americans to do this work. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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'They're Scared': Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage

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