Marisa Peñaloza Marisa Peñaloza is a senior producer on the National Desk.
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Marisa Peñaloza

A new law in Puerto Rico sets an ambitious timetable for the shift to renewable energy, including solar power. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Harnesses The Power Of The Sun For A Renewable Energy Future

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In Utuado, Puerto Rico, construction work is still going on to replace a bridge destroyed in Hurricane Maria. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'I Don't Feel Safe': Puerto Rico Preps For Next Storm Without Enough Government Help

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University of New Hampshire police recently participated in a training on hate crimes. The police chief enlisted the help of a traveling workshop organized by two advocacy groups. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

'We Need To Evolve': Police Get Help To Improve Hate Crime Tracking

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Tim Foley, the founder of Arizona Border Recon and Maggie Milinovitch, the co-owner of La Gitana Cantina, both live in the small border town of Arivaca, Ariz. The recent militia group presence has put strains on a town that has long prided itself on its live-and-let-live, cooperative spirit. Dominic Valente for NPR hide caption

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Dominic Valente for NPR

Militias Test The Civility Of An Arizona Border Town

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Jacinda, whose husband is a TSA officer in Portland, Ore., working during the shutdown without pay, with her two young children. Her family is worried about how they will pay their rent, electric bill and cellphone bill. Courtesy of Jacinda hide caption

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Courtesy of Jacinda

'I'm Scared': TSA Families Fear Falling Behind On Bills, Losing Their Homes

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The Capitol and Washington Monument are seen at dawn on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Not Expecting Back Pay, Government Contractors Collect Unemployment, Dip Into Savings

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Sara Cano with five of her six kids in front of her home in San Antonio Las Nubes, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. Her husband, Oscar Leonel Lopez, tried to immigrate to the U.S. but was deported back home. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

In the village of Quilin Novillo, the houses are billboards for the American dream. One is painted red, white and blue, with stars and stripes. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Despite Dangers, Intimidation, Guatemalans Still Seek A Better Life In U.S.

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Juan Valiente Velazquez's phone shows a picture of his son, Derickson, who remains in a youth shelter in New York. They were separated by the Border Patrol in Texas in May. Velazquez was deported to Guatemala. Derickson calls his parents three times each week. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Searching For Deported Parents In Guatemala, While Children Wait In The U.S.

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Sisters from Guatemala seeking asylum, cross a bridge to a port of entry in to the United States from Matamoros, Mexico, in Brownsville, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home

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