Marisa Peñaloza Marisa Peñaloza is a senior producer on the National Desk.
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Marisa Peñaloza

Vernetta Henson sits outside Union Baptist Church in Africatown. The church was started by Clotilda survivors in 1869. To her left is the bust of Cudjoe Lewis, one of the community's founder. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Exploring the Clotilda, the last known slave ship in the U.S., brings hope

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Retired pastor Julián Moreno, 80, lost his great-granddaugther during the Robb Elementary School shooting. Patricia Lim/KUT hide caption

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Patricia Lim/KUT

A former pastor grieves the loss of his great-granddaughter in Uvalde

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Police officers walk past a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Thursday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

The Uvalde shooting renews questions about school security

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Zahra Yagana, her daughter Parisa and son Jawed spent close to two months at Fort McCoy in western Wisconsin. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

Newly arrived Afghans get creative and find their own way to homes

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United States Border Patrol agents on horseback try to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Río Grande near the Acuña Del Río International Bridge in Del Río, Texas on Sept. 19. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

Volunteer Sandra Hoeser plays frisbee with Afghan refugees at Fort McCoy on Sept. 30. There are nearly 13,000 Afghan refugees being cared for at the base under Operation Allies Welcome. Barbara Davidson/Getty Images hide caption

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Wisconsin military base turns into a small city as Afghans await resettlement

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New research shows racial disparities in opioid overdose rates, with the rate of deaths among Black people growing faster than in other groups. The researchers are calling for expanding access to drug treatment and to education on how to prevent overdoses using the antidote drug, naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Hossein Mahrammi, his wife, Razia Mahrami, and their four sons came from Kabul to the U.S. on a Special Immigrant Visa or SIV in March 2017. Marisa Peñaloza hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza

María Lara sits in her bedroom in the Bedford and Victoria Station apartment complex in Langley Park, Md., a densely populated, low-income suburb of Washington, D.C. Ian Morton/NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton/NPR

Joy Banner at the Fee-Fo-Lay Cafe in Wallace, La., on Juneteenth. Her community is mobilizing to fight the grain silo complex that could be built on their fence line. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Slaves Say This Proposed Grain Complex Will Destroy The Community

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Buildings were destroyed in a massive fire during the Tulsa Race Massacre when a white mob attacked the Greenwood neighborhood, a prosperous Black community in Tulsa, Okla., in 1921. Eyewitnesses recalled the specter of men carrying torches through the streets to set fire to homes and businesses. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

A Century After The Race Massacre, Tulsa Confronts Its Bloody Past

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Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, pictured Friday, celebrated his party's victory in a local election. Johnson's Conservatives fared well in local and regional elections. Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images