Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

People work at tables inside the WeWork co-working space in Washington, D.C., in 2013. The company pioneered the office rental sector known as co-working, where users lease shared workspace by the month. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, WeWork Backs Down On Employee Noncompete Requirements

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Nike Takes Calculated Business Bet With Renewed 'Just Do It' Campaign

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Simone Grimes made secret recordings of Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Melvin Watt that she says bolster her claims of harassment, retaliation and equal-pay violations by Watt and the agency. Seanie Blue hide caption

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Seanie Blue

Bugged At Work: How Secret Recordings Are Changing The Workplace

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It's Easier Than Ever To Record Conversations And That's Reshaping The Workplace

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Senate Banking Committee Approves CFPB Nominee Kathleen Kraninger

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Senate Panel Approves Kraninger As CFPB Head

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Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Mel Watt testifies at a Senate banking committee hearing in May 2017. An employee says her secret recordings show that he held up her pay raise as he pressed her for a relationship. Yuri Gripas/Reuters hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/Reuters

Federal Housing Agency Employee Secretly Taped Director's Sexual Advances Toward Her

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Workplace civil rights law prohibits discrimination against workers 40 and older. Yet worker advocates say recruiters sometimes exclude older workers by narrowing how and where they look for candidates. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Are Job Ads Targeting Young Workers Breaking The Law?

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The job market is booming and the economy is expanding. But wage growth hasn't kept pace, which has many economists puzzled. Adam Glanzman/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Glanzman/Getty Images

Solving The 'Wage Puzzle': Why Aren't Paychecks Growing?

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State representatives work in the house chambers at the State House in Montgomery, Ala. A federal appeals court sided with workers from Birmingham, Ala., who argued that state lawmakers racially discriminated against the majority-black city by blocking a minimum wage hike. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

In Battle Pitting Cities Vs. States Over Minimum Wage, Birmingham Scores A Win

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An employer in Indiana is piloting a program that offers a path to employment after failing a drug test. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Now Hiring: A Company Offers Drug Treatment And A Job To Addicted Applicants

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Arby's is among seven fast-food chains that have agreed to stop limiting their workers' ability to take jobs at other restaurants in the same chain. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Fast-Food Chains Back Away From Limits On Whom They Hire

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Ten states and the District of Columbia are investigating Wendy's and other fast-food chains over the use of "no poach" agreements that limit the ability of workers to switch jobs. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Regulators Investigate Fast-Food Chains' Limits On Whom They Hire

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Joana Dudley looks at a list of job prospects at a job fair in Miami Lakes, Fla., in January. In the government's June jobs report, the unemployment rate ticked up to 4 percent with more people entering the labor force. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

AT&T and Time Warner are not competitors; their proposed merger would be a "vertical integration" of complementary companies. Stephanie Keith/Reuters hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Reuters

U.S. Judge Approves AT&T's $85 Billion Merger With Time Warner

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