Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
Stories By

Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Passengers Experience Little Disruption Despite Grounding Of Boeing's 737 Max Jets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703535209/703535210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clarissa Horsfall joins with others during "A Day Without A Woman" demonstration on March 8, 2017, in Miami. Employment attorneys say they've seen a spike in pay-disparity cases. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Wendy Chase was elected to the New Hampshire House in November. Her mission to pass paid parental leave was inspired by the decades of care her daughter required after being diagnosed with cancer at age 2. Glenn Chase/Courtesy of Wendy Chase hide caption

toggle caption
Glenn Chase/Courtesy of Wendy Chase

Paid Family Leave Gains Momentum In States As Bipartisan Support Grows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/698336019/700310946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Blake Mycoskie attends the TOMS' End Gun Violence Together Rally, Feb. 11, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Mycoskie, the founder of TOMS shoes, is one of four business leaders asking Congress to pass a bill requiring background checks on all gun sales. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for TOMS Shoes hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for TOMS Shoes

CEOs Urge Congress To Expand Gun Background Checks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697839273/697839274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When Kelly O'Brien went to work at Fidelity Investments a year and a half ago, she was excited to learn the company would contribute to her student loan payments. Kelli Martin hide caption

toggle caption
Kelli Martin

A New Benefit: Some Companies Help Workers Pay Down Student Loans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696355143/697633064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aleta Dignard-Fung says she battled her ex-boyfriend for control of what music would play on her Spotify account. Courtesy of Aleta Dignard-Fung hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Aleta Dignard-Fung

When Your Shared Netflix Account Outlasts The Relationship

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693566073/695054852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Jon Marchione for NPR

Heavy Student Loan Debt Forces Many Millennials To Delay Buying Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689660957/691394391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tax season is more stressful this year for filers and IRS workers alike, because of new tax law changes and the partial government shutdown that has left the agency with roughly half its normal staff. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shutdown Squeezes IRS Workers Just As The Tax-Filing Season Is About To Start

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/687689976/687951166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal workers wait for food distribution to begin Saturday at a pop-up food bank in Rockville, Md. The Capital Area Food Bank is distributing free food to government employees during the shutdown. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Stewart/NPR

Federal Workers Struggle To Stretch Their Money As Shutdown Lingers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/685124785/685276712" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A "for sale" sign is seen in front of a home in Miami on Jan. 24, 2018. The partial shutdown of the federal government is causing some financial problems for furloughed workers who can't refinance their mortgages or buy homes because lenders can't verify their income. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some Mortgage Deals Are In Limbo As Government Shutdown Drags On

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/684093676/684346479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Freelancers Hub in Brooklyn offers classes, shared office space, tax and legal advice for free. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kholood Eid for NPR

This New Program Aims To Train The Growing Freelance Workforce

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/681807327/682160348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, followed by China's detention of two Canadians, escalated trade and security tensions that are now leading to travel jitters. Jason Lee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Lee/AFP/Getty Images

U.S., Canadian Executives Privately 'Spooked' About Traveling To China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676754587/677300132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With #MeToo In Mind, Employers Balance Workers' Privacy With Transparent Probes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/675505094/675505095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russia Joins OPEC In Agreement To Cut Oil Production By 1.2 Million Barrels A Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/674730837/674730840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Starwood Data Breach, Marriott And Customers Face Costly Headaches

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673172709/673172710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript