Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, DC. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession, and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Yuki started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology.

Yuki grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys, and has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

A razor wire fence surrounds the Adelanto immigration detention center, in Adelanto, Calif., April 13, 2017. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

'No Meaningful Oversight': ICE Contractor Overlooked Problems At Detention Centers

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The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement processing center in Adelanto, Calif., is one of the detention facilities operated by GEO Group Inc. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Tyler Haney, CEO of Outdoor Voices, is one of more than 180 business leaders who signed a letter opposing restrictive abortion laws. Rick Kern/Getty Images for Inc hide caption

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Rick Kern/Getty Images for Inc

CEOs Becoming More Active On Political Issues, Including Abortion

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Spam phone calls are the No. 1 consumer complaint at the Federal Communications Commission. Seventy percent of people no longer answer calls they don't recognize, according to Consumer Reports. smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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smartboy10/Getty Images

'Do I Know You?' And Other Spam Phone Calls We Can't Get Rid Of

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Trucks are seen heading into the United States from Mexico along the Bridge of the Americas in El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday. U.S. industries say President Trump's threatened tariffs on goods from Mexico raised uncertainty just as they were looking forward to a new trade agreement. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

White House's About-Face On Mexican Trade A 'Gut Punch' To U.S. Businesses

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JPMorgan Chase will pay $5 million to hundreds, possibly thousands, of men who filed for primary caregiver leave and were denied in the last seven years. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A Dad Wins Fight To Increase Parental Leave For Men At JPMorgan Chase

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Demonstrators march to McDonald's corporate headquarters in Chicago on Thursday to demand $15-per-hour wages for fast food workers. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Protests Over Sexual Harassment At McDonald's Grow As Shareholders Meet

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Gaby Gemetti decided to leave the workforce after having her second child. In March she started a "returnship," a new type of program to recruit and retrain women like her who are looking to resume their careers. Here, Gaby and John Gemetti are seen with their children, Carlo and Gianna. Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography

Hot Job Market Is Wooing Women Into Workforce Faster Than Men

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Zakary Pashak started Detroit Bikes when he moved to Detroit in 2011, at a time when the city was reeling. Courtesy of Melany Hallgren hide caption

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Courtesy of Melany Hallgren

For One U.S. Bike-Maker, Tariffs Are A Mixed Bag

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A cargo ship prepares to berth at a port in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province on Wednesday. New tariffs went into effect Friday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

New Round Of Tariffs Takes A Bigger Bite Of Consumers' Budget

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Marriott International's Homes & Villas home-rental initiative offers luxury properties in 100 markets. It's an example of how the hotel and short-term home-rental businesses are converging. Marriott International hide caption

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Marriott International

Staying At A Hotel Or An Airbnb? The Lines Are Blurring

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Ed Coambs borrowed several thousand dollars on his business credit card — the only account he didn't share with his wife, Ann — without telling her. Courtesy of Ed Coambs hide caption

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Courtesy of Ed Coambs

Keeping Money Secrets From Each Other: Financial Infidelity On The Rise

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Jessica Holloway-Haytcher uses an app that helps her track meals, exercise and keep in touch with an online coach. Mark Rogers Photography hide caption

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Mark Rogers Photography

My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital

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Tom DiGiovanni's job as chief financial officer for Canndescent involves managing bags of cash by the millions which must be counted, then hauled in armored vehicles. Devan Schwartz for NPR hide caption

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Devan Schwartz for NPR

Bags Of Cash, Armed Guards And Wary Banks: The Edgy Life Of A Cannabis Company CFO

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