Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

Federal workers wait for food distribution to begin Saturday at a pop-up food bank in Rockville, Md. The Capital Area Food Bank is distributing free food to government employees during the shutdown. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

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Ian Stewart/NPR

Federal Workers Struggle To Stretch Their Money As Shutdown Lingers

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A "for sale" sign is seen in front of a home in Miami on Jan. 24, 2018. The partial shutdown of the federal government is causing some financial problems for furloughed workers who can't refinance their mortgages or buy homes because lenders can't verify their income. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some Mortgage Deals Are In Limbo As Government Shutdown Drags On

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The Freelancers Hub in Brooklyn offers classes, shared office space, tax and legal advice for free. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

This New Program Aims To Train The Growing Freelance Workforce

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The arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, followed by China's detention of two Canadians, escalated trade and security tensions that are now leading to travel jitters. Jason Lee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Lee/AFP/Getty Images

U.S., Canadian Executives Privately 'Spooked' About Traveling To China

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With #MeToo In Mind, Employers Balance Workers' Privacy With Transparent Probes

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Russia Joins OPEC In Agreement To Cut Oil Production By 1.2 Million Barrels A Day

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After Starwood Data Breach, Marriott And Customers Face Costly Headaches

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Post Harassment Scandal, New CEO Aims To Change Restaurant Culture

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A member of the staff walks through Luke, one of the restaurants still owned by John Besh, on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans. Emily Kask for NPR hide caption

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Emily Kask for NPR

Work After #MeToo: A Restaurant Company Tries To Change Its Culture

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Google Employees Stage Protest Of Company's Handling Of Sexual Harassment Complaints

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Google Employees Plan A Walkout Over The Handling Of Sexual Harassment Claims

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Nasdaq Sees Biggest Single-Day Loss In 7 Years

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CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods Ed Stack visits a new store in the Houston area in 2016. In February, Stack pulled assault-style weapons from store shelves and raised the minimum age to buy guns to 21. Scott Dalton/Invision/AP hide caption

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Blue And Red Companies: How CEO Activism Is Reshaping Workforce Politics

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