Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct racial-bias training. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious Bias

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An Uber car waits for a client in Manhattan last June. Uber says customers, drivers and employees who are sexually harassed or assaulted won't have to go to arbitration, which required them to keep their stories private. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, Uber Drops Arbitration Requirement For Sexual Assault Victims

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Asking questions about prior salary can be used by employers to discriminate against women and minorities who earn less, critics say. Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

More Employers Avoid Legal Minefield By Not Asking About Pay History

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Sean Hannity's Real Estate Portfolio Raises Journalism Ethics Questions

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Katy Sexton was a regular at the Road to Redemption recovery support group meetings in Muncie, Ind. She died on Halloween 2017. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Parents Lose Their Daughter And Their Life Savings To Opioids

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Katiena Johnson stands with her daughter Destini, who was released from jail in August. Katiena and her husband, Roger, took care of their grandchildren while Destini was struggling through her addiction. Destini, 27, recently regained consciousness after suffering a dozen or so strokes as a result of her latest opioid overdose. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Hear Part 1

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Federal Court Rules Employers Can't Pay Women Less Than Men Based On Prior Salary

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Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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Autumn Weese was fired — at least, she thinks she was — but found out from co-workers, not from her boss. Chandis Vaughn/Courtesy of Autumn Weese hide caption

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Chandis Vaughn/Courtesy of Autumn Weese

Fired Via Tweet, Text And Voicemail: Loss Of Job, And Respect

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Employees have lunch at Facebook's new London headquarters Dec. 4. The social media giant is facing blowback following revelations that its user data was misused. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook's Data Scandal Latest Blow To The Company's Reputation

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Toys R Us To Sell Or Liquidate All U.S. Stores

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Gig Economy Renews Debate Over Whether Contractors Are Really Employees

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Most workers are covered by the Family Medical Leave Act, which allows up to 12 weeks of leave per year to care for family members. But that leave is unpaid. Now, Republicans are making paid family leave a legislative policy. Jasmine Mithani and Katie Park/NPR hide caption

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Jasmine Mithani and Katie Park/NPR

Lawmakers Agree On Paid Family Leave, But Not The Details

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Deerfield Beach high school students arrive at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Friday after walking 11 miles from school to school in support of the victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Pension Funds Under Pressure To Sell Off Investments In Gun-Makers

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