Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Science Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. She started covering consumer health in the midst of the pandemic, reporting on everything from vaccination and racial inequities in access to health, to cancer care, obesity and mental health.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Noguchi has also covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years, she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Noguchi started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post.

Noguchi grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys and has a degree in history from Yale.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, and Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, testify at a Senate committee hearing about the federal response to COVID-19, on Jan. 11 in Washington, D.C. Shawn Thew/AP hide caption

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A growing problem in public health is getting people to heed advice

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Companies ramp up production of rapid COVID tests but they are still hard to get

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Limits on virtual addiction treatment may soon return, making care harder to access

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What public health experts say about the about the CDC's new quarantine guidelines

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Why the U.S.'s supply of COVID tests has been unpredictable — and how that can change

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The White House's plan may make it easier to get at-home COVID tests

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At-home rapid COVID-19 tests, like this one from Abbott, can be difficult to find and cost-prohibitive for some families. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Why rapid COVID tests are in short supply in the U.S.

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What the omicron variant means for plans to start working in-person again

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Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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Regulations are changing that will affect the future of telehealth

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Nurses check on a patient in a Jonesboro, Ark., ICU in August when the delta variant sparked yet another surge of serious COVID-19 cases in the region. The pandemic has only added to a longstanding nursing shortage in the U.S., statistics show. Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

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Just when more nurses are needed, it's more difficult to get into nursing school

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Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

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Telehealth has been vital during COVID, but most people still prefer in-person care

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