Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, DC. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession, and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Yuki started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology.

Yuki grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys, and has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

Amid impeachment and the 2020 election, surveys show political fevers running high at work, undercutting trust and productivity. And workers and employers are bracing for those dynamics to get worse. John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images hide caption

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John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images

I Can't Work With You! How Political Fights Leave Workplaces Divided

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The Secure Act aims to make it easier for small employers to offer retirement benefits. But some analysts say the new law doesn't go far enough because it's optional and doesn't apply to gig workers. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

New Law Aims To Help Americans Without Retirement Plans. Will It Work?

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Lindsey Balbierz for NPR

Want To Quit Your Job? Here's How To Do It Well

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Elizabeth Giorgi created the "candor clause" after being harassed by a would-be investor. "I've probably spoken to more than 100 female founders across the U.S., and I would say that half of us have a story," she says. Courtesy of Soona Studios hide caption

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Courtesy of Soona Studios

Investor's Naked Selfies Ignite #MeToo Moment: Female Founder Fights Back

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RK workers depart a bus on their way to the job site at a new airport under construction in Salt Lake City. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

A Construction Company Embraces Frank Talk About Mental Health To Reduce Suicide

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The U.S. House of Representatives passed a landmark proposal that would give 2 million workers paid leave upon the birth or adoption of a child, in what worker advocates call a hard-won victory. Richard Sharrocks/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Sharrocks/Getty Images

Federal Workers Poised To Get 12 Weeks Paid Parental Leave

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Former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker Dies

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Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul Volcker listens to a question as he appears before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington, D.C., in 1980. Chick Harrity/AP hide caption

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Chick Harrity/AP

Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies At 92

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Companies Try To Trademark 'Ok, Boomer' Expression

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The phrase "OK, boomer" has gone global. It has become young generations' retort to ideas they consider outdated or off base. Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

#OkBoomer Vs. #OkMillennial: Workplace Nightmare, Or Just A Meme?

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Until recently, Ernst & Young coached some top women leaders to look "polished" and speak briefly. The large accounting firm has since disavowed the program, arguing its workplace culture promotes women. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Post-#MeToo, Ernst & Young Grapples With Diverging Views Of Its Culture

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Jamie Marchi says she's faced backlash since making sexual harassment allegations. "The front door to my house has been posted online; my fiancé's children's names have been posted online," she says. Courtesy of Leslie Boren hide caption

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Courtesy of Leslie Boren

For Many #MeToo Accusers, Speaking Up Is Just The Beginning

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Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for co-workers who don't feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

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