Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Science Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. She started covering consumer health in the midst of the pandemic, reporting on everything from vaccination and racial inequities in access to health, to cancer care, obesity and mental health.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Noguchi has also covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years, she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Noguchi started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post.

Noguchi grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys and has a degree in history from Yale.

Story Archive

16 States Now Have Obesity Rates 35% Or Higher. That's 4 More States Than Last Year

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Small Changes May Help Exhausted Health Care Workers Combat Burnout

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Why It's Hard To Gauge How Workers' Burnout Is Affecting Patient Care

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Students head to class this month in Thornton, Colo. Infectious disease experts say the decline in vaccination rates against childhood diseases during the pandemic has increased the potential for outbreaks of diseases once largely vanquished in the United States. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Many Kids Have Missed Routine Vaccines, Worrying Doctors As School Starts

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Since The Pandemic Began, Many Kids Missed Out On Immunizations

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Some Employers Want Proof, Others Say Workers Can Just 'Attest' To Being Vaccinated

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Employers Are Struggling As Workplaces Divided Over Vaccine And Mask Policies

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Private Employers Wrestle With Trying To Vaccinate Their Workforce

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A human "Pink Ribbon" chain is made to raise breast cancer screening awareness in New York City. Taylor Hill/Getty Images hide caption

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The Ripple Effects Of A Huge Drop In Cancer Screenings

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Screenings For Cancer Dropped Dramatically During The Pandemic

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Health conditions exacerbated by obesity include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, according to the CDC. Researchers say the newly approved drug Wegovy could help many who struggle with obesity lose weight. adamkaz/Getty Images hide caption

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Obesity Drug's Promise Now Hinges On Insurance Coverage

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A New Obesity Drug Could Help Millions Of Americans. Its Future Hinges On Insurance

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Kayla Northam's weight topped 300 pounds as a teenager. She'd started to develop diabetes, and liver and joint problems before seeking bariatric surgery about a decade ago at age 18. Kayla Northam hide caption

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Kayla Northam

Bariatric Surgery Works, But Isn't Offered To Most Teens Who Have Severe Obesity

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