Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
Stories By

Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Science Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. She started covering consumer health in the midst of the pandemic, reporting on everything from vaccination and racial inequities in access to health, to cancer care, obesity and mental health.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Noguchi has also covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years, she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Noguchi started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post.

Noguchi grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys and has a degree in history from Yale.

Story Archive

Tuesday

wagnerokasaki/Getty Images

Scant obesity training in medical school leaves docs ill-prepared to help patients

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Thursday

Ariel Davis for NPR

Therapy by chatbot? The promise and challenges in using AI for mental health

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Revisiting the idea of whether AI might help those dealing with isolation, depression

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Tuesday

Encore: How did COVID warp our sense of time? It's a matter of perception

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Thursday

In 2021, the three leading causes of death were heart disease, cancer and COVID-19. Andy Ryan/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Ryan/Getty Images

American life expectancy is now at its lowest in nearly two decades

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Wednesday

DrAfter123/Getty Images

How did COVID warp our sense of time? It's a matter of perception

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Tuesday

Nearly two years after the FDA issued a policy denouncing the marketing of fruit-flavored vape juice and other vape products to young people, the products are still widely available in stores. But experts hope that could be about to change. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

Monday

The future of vaping depends on how regulators act now

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Thursday

Proposition 31 passes in California: flavored tobacco will be banned

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Wednesday

Jesse Zhang for NPR and KHN

Paying for mental health care leaves families in debt and isolated

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Monday

A Rhode Island woman's struggle to get her young daughter Medicaid coverage

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Monday

The mental health crisis and shortage of providers is creating big debt for Americans

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Wednesday

To settle state probes into teen vaping, Juul will pay nearly $440 million

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Tuesday

E-cigarette company Juul reaches settlement over its marketing of vaping products

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