Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Science Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. She started covering consumer health in the midst of the pandemic, reporting on everything from vaccination and racial inequities in access to health, to cancer care, obesity and mental health.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Noguchi has also covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years, she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Noguchi started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post.

Noguchi grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys and has a degree in history from Yale.

Story Archive

Community clinics say the easing of restrictions on telehealth during the pandemic has made it possible for health workers to connect with hard-to-reach patients via a phone call — people who are poor, elderly or live in remote areas, and don't have access to a computer or cellphone with video capability. Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Silke Enkelmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Voice-only telehealth may go away with pandemic rules expiring

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Regulations are changing that will affect the future of telehealth

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Nurses check on a patient in a Jonesboro, Ark., ICU in August when the delta variant sparked yet another surge of serious COVID-19 cases in the region. The pandemic has only added to a longstanding nursing shortage in the U.S., statistics show. Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Houston Cofield/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. needs more nurses, but nursing schools don't have enough slots

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Just when more nurses are needed, it's more difficult to get into nursing school

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Patients say telehealth is OK, but most prefer to see their doctor in person

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Telehealth has been vital during COVID, but most people still prefer in-person care

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Studies show burnout ran rampant in health care prior to the pandemic. Now it's a full-blown crisis. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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The Toll Of Burnout On Medical Workers — And Their Patients

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Matthew Crecelius, a traveling contract nurse who has worked in a dozen hospitals since the pandemic began, says that he can recall numerous instances where health care worker burnout has had a direct impact on patient care. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

A Planet Fitness employee cleans equipment before a gym's reopening in March in Inglewood, Calif., after being closed due to COVID-19. Reduced access to recreation likely has contributed to weight gain during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

16 States Now Have Obesity Rates 35% Or Higher. That's 4 More States Than Last Year

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Small Changes May Help Exhausted Health Care Workers Combat Burnout

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Why It's Hard To Gauge How Workers' Burnout Is Affecting Patient Care

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Students head to class this month in Thornton, Colo. Infectious disease experts say the decline in vaccination rates against childhood diseases during the pandemic has increased the potential for outbreaks of diseases once largely vanquished in the United States. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Many Kids Have Missed Routine Vaccines, Worrying Doctors As School Starts

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Since The Pandemic Began, Many Kids Missed Out On Immunizations

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