Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
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Yuki Noguchi

Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Science Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Science Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. She started covering consumer health in the midst of the pandemic, reporting on everything from vaccination and racial inequities in access to health, to cancer care, obesity and mental health.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Noguchi has also covered a range of business and economic news, with a special focus on the workplace — anything that affects how and why we work. In recent years, she has covered the rise of the contract workforce, the #MeToo movement, the Great Recession and the subprime housing crisis. In 2011, she covered the earthquake and tsunami in her parents' native Japan. Her coverage of the impact of opioids on workers and their families won a 2019 Gracie Award and received First Place and Best In Show in the radio category from the National Headliner Awards. She also loves featuring offbeat topics, and has eaten insects in service of journalism.

Noguchi started her career as a reporter, then an editor, for The Washington Post.

Noguchi grew up in St. Louis, inflicts her cooking on her two boys and has a degree in history from Yale.

Story Archive

To settle state probes into teen vaping, Juul will pay nearly $440 million

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E-cigarette company Juul reaches settlement over its marketing of vaping products

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After years of carrying medical debt from the premature birth of her daughter, Terri Logan recently discovered a nonprofit called RIP Medical Debt had paid off her bills. Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for KHN and NPR

This group's wiped out $6.7 billion in medical debt, and it's just getting started

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Oona Tempest/KHN

How to get rid of medical debt — or avoid it in the first place

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41% of adults in the U.S. have medical debt. Here are some ways to try to avoid it

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The complicated — and rapidly shifting — legal risks of getting an abortion by pill

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Juul is ordered by the FDA to pull all of its vaping products from the U.S. market

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The FDA wants to reduce the amount of nicotine allowed in cigarettes

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FDA gives emergency approval for COVID-19 vaccines for kids as young as 6 months

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3 people with a serious mental illness share their journeys through the pandemic

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What is the future of abortion pills, if the Supreme Court lets states ban abortion?

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Alex Brandon/AP

An upcoming Supreme Court ruling may disproportionately impact on people of color

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Margarette Osias, 28, poses for a portrait in her office in Laurel, Delaware on February 22, 2022. Osias is a bilingual outreach navigator and medical interpreter at Tabitha Medical Care wherein they provide free universal cancer screening and treatment in accordance with newly passed legislation in the state of Delaware. Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

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Rosem Morton for NPR

Delaware is shrinking racial gaps in cancer death. Its secret? Patient navigators

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