Kate Concannon Kate Concannon is the Supervising Senior Editor at The Indicator from Planet Money.
Kate Concannon headshot
Stories By

Kate Concannon

Courtesy of Kate Concannon
Kate Concannon headshot
Courtesy of Kate Concannon

Kate Concannon

Supervising Senior Editor, The Indicator from Planet Money

Kate Concannon is the Supervising Senior Editor at The Indicator from Planet Money. She leads this small, collaborative team of hosts, reporters and producers in making sense of crucial, but often complex and confusing, economic news in just 10 minutes a day.

She graduated from Ryerson University in Toronto with a degree in journalism, and soon after moved to the US where she fell in love with NPR. She took a position at KPBS in San Diego, creating that station's first daily news magazine show, These Days, a groundbreaking show in public media at that time.

Continuing her love of Western stories, Concannon became the founding managing editor of the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration of public media stations and journalism outlets across seven Mountain West states. She led this small but scrappy team in winning a number of high profile awards, including her second Gracie, a National Murrow, the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, the Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism and, for her editing work, the Public Media Journalism Association's 2020 editor of the year.

She took a rather circuitous route into journalism. In an earlier life she was a registered nurse and midwife in the UK where she delivered more than fifty babies. But as a news junkie addicted to reading and writing, she always dreamed of reporting and delivering the news instead.

Concannon eventually joined NPR's national desk where over the next twelve years she perfected her editing chops as one of two Western Bureau Chiefs.

In her spare time, Concannon likes to ski the beautiful mountains of Washington state and British Columbia with her husband and three sons, go to as many live concerts and music festivals as possible and read dystopian novels where good always triumphs over evil.

Story Archive

Thursday

An image characterizing the Whiskey Rebellion when a government inspector is tarred during the Insurrection of 1794 in the four western counties of Pennsylvania, caused by Hamilton's excise tax. Bettman hide caption

toggle caption
Bettman

Wednesday

Getty Images

Tuesday

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Monday

Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Friday

It may soon get easier to become a certified public accountant, reducing the number of required college credit hours from 150 to 120. SOPA Images/Lightrocket hide caption

toggle caption
SOPA Images/Lightrocket

Thursday

Getty Images

Wednesday

AUSTIN, TEXAS (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images) Brandon Bell//Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bell//Getty Images

Tuesday

A 2017 march against sexual assault and harassment in Hollywood. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Damian Dovarganes/AP

Monday

Getty Images

Friday

In 2010, gold surpassed $1400 an ounce for the first time. Today, it sits above $2300 an ounce. Al Grillo/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
Al Grillo/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thursday

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Wednesday

Getty Images
Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

Inside video game economics (Two Indicators)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197958978/1250043487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Nate Hegyi/Nate Hegyi

Monday

The Shoshone Generating Station, a hydroelectric power plant on the Colorado River east of Glenwood Canyon. (Alex Hager, KUNC) Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Hager/KUNC

Friday

Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Thursday

CA Highway Patrol officers walk on the University of California, Los Angeles campus on May 1, 2024 near a pro-Palestinian encampment. Hundreds of protesters have since been arrested on UCLA's campus. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Protesters want schools to divest from Israel. How would that work?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197964363/1248823217" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

A cabinet maker in North Carolina is seeing interest rates slow down home development. His clients in the Outer Banks though, pictured here, are moving ahead as normal. John Greim/LightRocket hide caption

toggle caption
John Greim/LightRocket

What a cabinet maker can teach us about interest rates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197964358/1248566167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Photograph courtesy of Darian Woods Darian Woods/Darian Woods hide caption

toggle caption
Darian Woods/Darian Woods

Monday

Luxury beach front houses on the Outer Banks in North Carolina John Greim/LightRocket hide caption

toggle caption
John Greim/LightRocket

Friday

Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

Video Game Industry Week: The Final Level

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197964057/1247551669" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Despite the video game industry raking in more and more money every year, the working conditions for many designers leave much to be desired. Recent surveys show that developers don't believe their careers are sustainable, leading to a surge of unionization efforts in the industry. Theresa O'Reilly for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

Wednesday

The explosive growth of Esports has made it so that elite-level competitive gamers can leverage their ability into a full-time job. But what does the life of a typical Esports pro look like and how do they think about their long-term prospects with Esports growth stagnating? Theresa O'Reilly for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

The boom and bust of esports

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197964043/1247019301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Accessibility has long been an afterthought in the video game industry. However, that's changed over the last decade as incentives have changed. It's estimated that there are 46 million gamers with disabilities, creating a strong incentive for video game companies to improve their accessibility efforts. Theresa O'Reilly for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

Designing for disability: how video games become more accessible

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197964005/1246640698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript