Austin Fast Austin Fast specializes in data analysis on NPR's investigations team.
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Austin Fast

Austin Fast

Assistant Producer, Data Investigations

Austin Fast specializes in data analysis on NPR's investigations team, often collaborating with reporters from Member stations across the country.

Before coming to NPR, Fast reported for KJZZ in Phoenix and covered the world's largest wild salmon fishery at KDLG in Dillingham, Alaska. He's also written breaking news at a Cincinnati TV station and taught English overseas with the Peace Corps.

Fast holds a master's degree in investigative journalism from Arizona State University and bachelor's degrees in journalism and international studies from Miami University (Ohio).

Story Archive

Courtney Gramm waited seven months to receive her nurse practitioner license in California. Nursing boards, meant as a safeguard, have become an obstacle, preventing qualified nurses from getting into the workforce for months when basic vetting should take only weeks. Alyssa Schukar for NPR hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for NPR

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Nurses are waiting 6 months or more for licenses despite hospitals' need for nurses

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Medics transport a man with COVID-19 symptoms to a hospital in Austin, Texas. More than 3 million people in the state have had COVID-19, but just 81,000 are listed in a central data set at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Millions Of People Are Missing From CDC COVID Data As States Fail To Report Cases

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Where Are The Newest COVID Hot Spots? Mostly Places With Low Vaccination Rates

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Poverty and disability are linked to lower vaccination rates in some rural communities. The Vaccination Transportation Initiative sponsored van helps rural residents get the COVID-19 vaccine in rural Mississippi. The effort works to overcome the lack of transportation and access to technology for rural residents. Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rory Doyle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A pharmacist administers a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to a worker at a processing plant in Arkansas City, Kan., on March 5. Researchers are concerned that vaccination rates in some rural communities may not keep up with urban rates. Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Ruth Talbot/NPR

Across The South, COVID-19 Vaccine Sites Missing From Black And Hispanic Neighborhoods

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