Ryan Kailath Ryan Kailath is a business reporter at NPR in the New York bureau.
Ryan Kailath
Stories By

Ryan Kailath

Story Archive

Performance Venues Wait For Aid From Earlier COVID-19 Relief Measure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/975545530/975545531" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The marquee of the IFC Center in Manhattan welcomes viewers back after being closed nearly one year Ryan Kailath/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kailath/NPR

The Movie Industry Holds Its Breath As New York Reopens Theaters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/973474340/973792048" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Belongings Sold At Auction As Missed Payments To Storage Sites Increase

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972742614/972742615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Major Players In GameStop Stock Saga Appear Before House Committee

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969151076/969151077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An undated photo of President Herbert Hoover, whose term as president ran from 1929 to 1933. He railed against short sellers after the market crash of 1929. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Wall Street Short Sellers: Hated For Centuries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/966877259/968150369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Global Shortage In Computer Chips Hits Auto Industry. What Industries Are Next?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/967458767/967458768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Financier Ken Griffin has been slammed on chat rooms like WallstreetBets. Michael Kovac/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Ken Griffin: The Hedge Fund Titan In The Middle Of The Reddit Investing Revolt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/963995484/964116367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Confusion, Finger Pointing Remain After Wild Ride Of GameStop Shares

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/963913568/963913569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Empty offices sit above empty retail stores on Broadway in downtown Manhattan. As commercial real estate continues to lie vacant around the U.S., it may contribute to a vicious economic cycle that reshapes our cities. Ryan Kailath for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kailath for NPR

'Do I Really Need This Much Office Space?' Pandemic Emptied Buildings, But How Long?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/906767790/908456912" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virtual Schmoozing: How The Pandemic Changed Ways Businesses Seal The Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/902659751/902659752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Apple, the world's most valuable publicly traded company, became the first to reach the milestone $1 trillion market value. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Apple Becomes World's 1st Private-Sector Company Worth $1 Trillion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632697978/635047813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What's At Stake For Apple In China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634492250/634492251" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In shadow marketplaces, positive reviews for Amazon products are bought and sold. The company says it's cracking down and that it estimates that less than 1 percent of reviews are fake. Mike Segar/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Segar/Reuters

Some Amazon Reviews Are Too Good To Be Believed. They're Paid For

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629800775/634087462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Starbucks Kicks Decisions Back To Their Store Employees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/614640387/614640388" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript