Sandhya Dirks Sandhya Dirks is a National Correspondent covering race and identity for NPR.
Sandhya Dirks
Stories By

Sandhya Dirks

KQED
Sandhya Dirks
KQED

Sandhya Dirks

National Correspondent, Race and Identity

Sandhya Dirks is a National Correspondent covering race and identity for NPR.

Previously, Dirks was the race and equity reporter at KQED and the lead producer of On Our Watch, a podcast from NPR and KQED about the shadow world of police discipline. She approaches race and equity not as a beat, but as a fundamental lens for all investigative and explanatory reporting.

Dirks covers policing, housing, social justice movements, and the shifting demographics of cities and suburbs. She's the creator and co-host of the podcast American Suburb, about the transformation of suburbia into the most diverse space in American life. She was the editor for Truth Be Told, an advice show for and by people of color. Her stories about race, space, and belonging were part of KQED's So Well Spoken project, which won RNDTA's Kaleidoscope award, honoring outstanding achievements in the coverage of diversity.

Prior to joining KQED in 2015, Dirks covered the 2012 presidential election from the swing state of Iowa for Iowa Public Radio. At KPBS in San Diego, she broke the story of a sexual harassment scandal that led to the mayor's resignation. She got her start in radio working on documentaries about Oakland that investigated the high drop-out rate in public schools and mistrust between the police and the community. Dirks lives in Oakland and believes all stories are stories about power.

Story Archive

Police guard the front of the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin where at least one gunman fired upon people at a service August, 5, 2012 in Oak Creek, Wis. Six people were killed when a shooter, who was later shot dead by a police officer, opened fire on congregants in the Milwaukee suburb. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Community members remember the massacre at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin

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Pregnancy outcomes may be increasingly scrutinized by law enforcement

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Abortion rights demonstrators chant during a protest outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Abortion is also about racial justice, experts and advocates say

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Striking down 'Roe v. Wade' will hit people of color hardest, activists say

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Some South Asian Americans believe caste-based prejudices exist in the U.S.

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Shinese Harlins-Kilgore, cousin of Latasha Harlins and CEO of the Latasha Harlins Foundation, receives a hug from Lora King, daughter of Rodney King and CEO of the Rodney King Foundation, during the 30th anniversary of the Rodney King Civil Unrest HOPE Community Bus Tour Press conference in Los Angeles. Latasha, 15, was fatally shot in a liquor store. Gabriella Angotti-Jones/for NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Angotti-Jones/for NPR

The LA Riots, 30 years later

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The Los Angeles Riots still resonate after 30 years

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1 year after the Atlanta spa shootings, a look at the movement to Stop Asian Hate

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Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, with President Biden and Vice President Harris, speaks after being nominated for the U.S. Supreme Court at the White House on Feb. 25. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Civil rights activists are prepared to fight for Jackson's nomination to the court

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Civil rights activists rally behind Supreme Court pick — and prepare for the backlash

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Post racist attack in 1921 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. American National Red Cross Photograph Collection. GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why does Black History Month matter?

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Black history is more than one month, but February matters

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The Supreme Court pictured in a photo from 2021. Justice Stephen Breyer is set to retire at the end of the term. President Biden has pledged to seat a Black woman on the court. Erin Schaff/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A Black woman on the High Court is a good start. But representation has limits.

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Black women in the legal profession reflect on how long it's taken to get this far

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