Berly McCoy Berly McCoy is an assistant producer for Short Wave.
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Berly McCoy

Courtesy of Berly McCoy
Berly McCoy headshot
Courtesy of Berly McCoy

Berly McCoy

Assistant Producer, Short Wave

Kimberly (Berly) McCoy (she/her) is an assistant producer for NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast tells stories about science and scientists, in all the forms they take.

McCoy started working with NPR as the program coordinator of the NPR Scicommers, a group founded by Joe Palca and Maddie Sofia to teach scientists and engineers how to better communicate and find community.

After lending a fact-checking hand to the Short Wave team on and off, they graciously taught McCoy the production ropes, where she now produces regularly, with stories ranging from axolotls to physics.

In another life, McCoy earned her PhD in biochemistry transforming viruses into nanoreactors. She dug through garbage to understand human recycling behavior, counted rattlesnake tongue flicks to gauge their diet preferences and caught endangered butterflies on mountain tops for population surveys.

She lives just outside of Glacier National Park and enjoys rock climbing, ice fishing, her rambunctious dogs and making food magically appear from dirt.

Story Archive

The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press

J. Kenji López-Alt's new cookbook The Wok features more than 200 recipes highlighting the versatility of the wok. Along the way, he shares the science behind that versatility and how to master cooking basics. J. Kenji López-Alt hide caption

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J. Kenji López-Alt

Wok This Way: A Science Cooking Show

What's the most versatile pan in the kitchen? According to chef and cookbook author J. Kenji López-Alt, it's the wok! And along with spices, he sprinkles science explainers into his writing. Today's episode is just that — the science of the wok in action. He and host Emily Kwong talk about how to choose, season and cook with one, and why its unique shape makes it so versatile. Plus, we hear how Emily fared cooking one of Kenji's dishes from his new cookbook The Wok.

Wok This Way: A Science Cooking Show

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Velvet chicken with snap peas and lemon-ginger sauce. J. Kenji López-Alt hide caption

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J. Kenji López-Alt

How To Keep Meat Juicy With Science

How do you make the perfect stir-fry chicken without drying it out? Today, we answer that question with cookbook author and chef J. Kenji López-Alt and science! Host Emily Kwong talks to Scientist-In-Residence Regina G. Barber about velveting, a technique used to seal in moisture during high heat cooking. Then, some listener mail!

How To Keep Meat Juicy With Science

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ATLANTA, GA - MAY 21: People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images) Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

How Changes in Abortion Law Could Impact Community Health

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Abortion rights demonstrators gather near the Washington Monument during a nationwide rally in support of abortion rights in Washington, D.C., US, on May 14, 2022. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

Abortion access has been leading political news in recent weeks. But what happens when we look at abortion as a health care tool that betters public health? Today, Emily talks to Liza Fuentes, a Senior Research Scientist at the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that focuses on sexual and reproductive health. Fuentes says abortion access is an important part of health care for a community and losing access can exacerbate income and health inequalities.

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

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Jada Yuan with her grandmother, Chien-Shiung Wu. Wu/Yuan family hide caption

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Wu/Yuan family

Particle and experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu. University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries hide caption

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University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery

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Girl grimaces in front of a spoon of bitter medicine. timsa/Getty Images hide caption

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timsa/Getty Images

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

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Papaya or Papaw (Carica papaya), cut in cross-section, Caricaceae. De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images

The Importance Of The Vaginal Microbiome

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Variety of medical supplies Peter Stark/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Peter Stark/Getty Images/fStop

Lessons From HIV On Ending The COVID Pandemic

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A medical worker administers tests at a Covid-19 testing site in New York City. New York City and other places in the Northeast are seeing an uptick in infection numbers. Spencer Platt / Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Signs warning of health risks are posted outside the gates of abandoned uranium mine in the community of Red Water Pond on Monday, Jan. 13th, 2020. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

An indri—a species of lemur in Madagascar—sings from a tree branch. Filippo Carugati hide caption

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Filippo Carugati

US President Joe Biden receives a second booster shot of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine a day after the US authorized a fourth dose of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna Covid-19 vaccines for people 50 and older NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP via Getty Images