This Week in Illinois History This Week in Illinois History provides a 90-second snapshot of an event significant to Illinois history. Join Host Clint Cargile as he covers big events while also exposing little-known pieces of Illinois history.
This Week in Illinois History

This Week in Illinois History

From Northern Public Radio

This Week in Illinois History provides a 90-second snapshot of an event significant to Illinois history. Join Host Clint Cargile as he covers big events while also exposing little-known pieces of Illinois history.

Most Recent Episodes

This Week in Illinois History: First train in Illinois (November 8, 1838)

In early November 1838, the first railroad in Illinois went into operation. The train went on a symbolic, eight-mile run, introducing the state to the transportation that would dominate the next century.

This Week in Illinois History: First train in Illinois (November 8, 1838)

This Week In Illinois History: The great horse epidemic (early November, 1872)

In late 1872 a horse epidemic brought the nation to a standstill. Never before had the country's ability to conduct business been so paralyzed.

This Week In Illinois History: The great horse epidemic (early November, 1872)

This Week in Illinois History: H. V. Porter, father of March Madness (October 27, 1975)

The term "March Madness," used in connection with basketball, originated in Illinois. This is the story of H. V. Porter, who popularized "March Madness" and created many of basketball's rules still in use today.

This Week in Illinois History: H. V. Porter, father of March Madness (October 27, 1975)

This Week In Illinois History: The End Of Al Capone (October 17, 1931)

He is remembered as one of the nation's most notorious gangsters, but Al Capone's career as head of Chicago organized crime came to a sudden and ignominious end after only six years.

This Week In Illinois History: The End Of Al Capone (October 17, 1931)

This Week In Illinois History: Red Stripe Beer – An Illinois Original? (October 11, 1886)

What's the connection between Red Stripe Beer from Jamaica and Red Stripe Beer from Galena, Illinois? It's an Illinois history mystery.

This Week In Illinois History: Red Stripe Beer – An Illinois Original? (October 11, 1886)

This Week In Illinois History: Dr. Pearl Kendrick (October 8, 1980)

In the 1930s, Wheaton, Illinois, native Pearl Kendrick created a vaccine that has saved millions of lives and is still standard for American children today.

This Week In Illinois History: Victory Speed! (October 1, 1942)

How do you convince fast-moving Americans that driving slow will conserve rubber and help the war effort? You call the new speed limit "Victory Speed."

This Week In Illinois History: Army Abandons Massive Hospital Complex (September 20, 1946)

During World War II, the United States Army built sprawling hospital complexes across the country to treat wounded soldiers. One of the largest was built in Galesburg, Illinois.

This Week In Illinois History: Army Abandons Massive Hospital Complex (September 20, 1946)

This Week In Illinois History: Remote Learning By Radio (September 13, 1937)

When a deadly polio outbreak hit Chicago in 1937, the city shuttered its schools. But kids didn't get a free pass. They took part in a remote learning experiment with the best technology available: the radio.

This Week In Illinois History: Remote Learning By Radio (September 13, 1937)

This Week In Illinois History: The Battle Of Nauvoo (September 10, 1846)

In 1846, an Illinois militia laid siege to Nauvoo, one of the state's largest cities. Their goal? Drive out the last members of the Mormon Church.

This Week In Illinois History: The Battle Of Nauvoo (September 10, 1846)