Undisciplined Undisciplined is a podcast produced in collaboration with the African and African American Studies program with the University and KUAF Public Radio. Hosted by Dr. Caree Banton, this podcast will push the confines of your traditional academic disciplines and unveil how the objectives of African and African American studies can be found in the everyday if you just look.
Undisciplined

Undisciplined

From KUAF

Undisciplined is a podcast produced in collaboration with the African and African American Studies program with the University and KUAF Public Radio. Hosted by Dr. Caree Banton, this podcast will push the confines of your traditional academic disciplines and unveil how the objectives of African and African American studies can be found in the everyday if you just look.

Most Recent Episodes

Can Summer School Close the Opportunity Gap?: A Case Study of Baylor Freedom Schools

In this episode, we shift the narrative of summer school from punishment to enrichment. Dr. Lakia Scott, Assistant Provost for Faculty Development & Diversity at Yale University, shares her experience as the Founding Executive Director of the Baylor Freedom Schools Program. This episode explores the program's enrichment impact on students, strategies for fostering successful collaborations with local school districts and other sponsors, and the logistical and cultural considerations in building the program and curricula. The program's unique focus on texts that explore citizenship, government, History, and culture as a pathway to expand African American students' access to educational enrichment, equity, and opportunity is particularly relevant in an education policy era that may be widening the opportunity gap.

Can Summer School Close the Opportunity Gap?: A Case Study of Baylor Freedom Schools

Unveiling the Roles of Pirates and Black Civil War Communities

Historian, Angela Sutton, speaks to us about her groundbreaking new book, PIRATES OF THE SLAVE TRADE: THE BATTLE OF CAPE LOPEZ AND THE BIRTH OF AN AMERICAN INSTITUTION, in which she explores how a pivotal battle between the British navy and a notorious pirate crew, led by "Black Bart" Roberts, cleared the way for an explosion of the slave trade, the establishment of chattel slavery in the Americas, and the deadly racism that still permeates U.S. society. She also speaks to us about her current work at Fort Negley and what it means to do the work of breaking the barriers created by slavery, racism, and other inequities.

Black Wall Street: The Enduring Legacy of a Race Massacre

In this episode, we chat with Victor Luckerson, journalist and author of Built From the Fire, recognized as a Best Book of the Year by the New York Times, is a multigenerational saga of a family and a community in Tulsa's Greenwood district, known as "Black Wall Street." Listeners can look forward to exploring the differences between the mythology about the Tulsa Race Massacre and the evidential facts of what occurred before, during, and after the massacre. Join us as we explore the connections between the forms of racial violence of the past and modern forms of racial violence enacted through policies like urban renewal and gentrification. Enjoy the lessons that critical figures of Black Wall Street have to teach us about women, Black love, wealth, and success.

Textbooks: Facts Are Not Necessarily Truth

In this episode of Undisciplined, we explore the complexities, conscientious choices, and cultural considerations that impact the development of textbooks. American Historian, author, and academic Dr. Kathleen DuVal talks with us about how her interests in early American history led to her co-authorship on Give Me Liberty! We put the textbook in conversation with the current textbook culture throughout the United States, its use and relevance for curriculum and instruction in the 7-12 social studies classroom, and the topics yet to be explored. This episode is a fascinating dive into understanding how the everyday citizen should read, question, and analyze textbooks for their storytelling of truth versus fact.

Black Slavery, Native Nations, and the Path to Reconciliation

This podcast is based on Roberts' recent book, I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land. We explore questions around Black freedom and Native American relationships. The trail of tears runs through NWA and Native Americans moved though the area with their enslaved Africans. Furthermore, with westward expansion onto Native land, the question of black citizenship would be co-mingled with the issue. As Black, white, and Native people recreated concepts of race, belonging, and national identity, Indian Territory became a space where Black people could flee to escape the ravishes of Jim Crow, as well as finally become landowners and while also exercising political rights. But Blacks have had to sue Native Nations for citizenship rights in recent years. Now with increasing calls for reparations and demands for land, Black and Native relationships are necessary to understand. Alaina Roberts, Associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh.Check out her website: https://alainaeroberts.com/

Karynecia, Our new Co-Host: It's the Storytelling For Me

In this episode, we get to know Dr. Karynecia Elizabeth Conner, the new Co-host of Undisciplined Podcast! We learn about the twists and turns on Karynecia's life path that has led her to us and the University of Arkansas! You'll learn how she used tragedy to triumph, what makes her so Texas, what her greatest inspirations are, and what the listeners can expect from her as a co-host. Don't miss this one!

Hidden African and African American Treasures in the University Museum

University of Arkansas Museum's Laurel Lamb speaks about artifacts and objects available in the University Museum and the new activities available for families, children and the public.

Reading Black History Through Film

In this episode, we speak to three Black Film makers about conveying Black history through the lens of films. We explore how these different kinds of storytelling are facilitating new kinds of narratives about African Americans and Arkansas as well as helping to transform the single story and stereotypes about African Americans.Caree Banton, @diasporise, the_forgetful_historianKarynecia Conner @thewordyprofessor

Fayetteville High School Students Articulate their views on Black History and Policies Aff...

In this episode, Fayetteville High School Students weigh in on a conversation that has largely affected their lives but from which people like them tend to be excluded. These students reflect on Black History and policies and politics Surrounding their Education including the Black History Curriculum, the Learns Act, the banning of AP African American Studies and Critical Race Studies that affect their learning.

Fayetteville High School Students Articulate their views on Black History and Policies Aff...

Pan-Africanism from an African Perspective

Kenneth Tagoe, currently an M.A. History student from Ghana, West Africa is passionate about Pan-Africanism. He grew up idolizing Pan-African icons like Marcus Garvey, Du Bois, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Kwame Nkrumah and the ideas of black consciousness advocated by Frederick Douglass. In this episode, we explore the History of the Black Bombers, Ghana's Amateur Boxing Team, and its contribution to Pan- Pan-Africanism and nation-building in Ghana.