OSU Research Matters OSU Research Matters is a bi-weekly look inside the work of Oklahoma State University faculty, staff and students. The show showcases the impact of OSU's research on everyday life. Find out more at research.okstate.edu.
OSU Research Matters

OSU Research Matters

From KOSU

OSU Research Matters is a bi-weekly look inside the work of Oklahoma State University faculty, staff and students. The show showcases the impact of OSU's research on everyday life. Find out more at research.okstate.edu.

Most Recent Episodes

Oklahoma State University professor studies so-called junk DNA

Much of the research on our genome focuses on the genes that make proteins, but those only constitute about one percent of our DNA. What about the other 99% that is considered noncoding — which was once called junk DNA? It might not be junk. As much as 80% of the genome has some biochemical function, but we remain puzzled by its role. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Darren Hagen, who, along with his students, is studying a diverse array of species to identify genome features and decipher the role of the unknown 99%.

Oklahoma State University professor studies health inequities in Indigenous populations

Many American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities experience high rates of health inequities including tobacco-related health conditions, alcohol and substance use disorders, suicide deaths, and more recently, negative impacts of the COVID-19 global pandemic. These health inequities have catastrophic mental health and public health impacts; yet, these research areas remain largely understudied among AI/AN populations. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Ashley Cole to learn more about existing prevention and intervention efforts to improve the health of AI/AN communities.

Oklahoma State University professor studies health inequities in Indigenous populations

Avast! This Oklahoma State professor studies pirates

The pirate held a central place among rogues who scandalized through the pages of crime literature in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Pirates supplied ample material for tales of wild adventures in exotic locations. Beyond their luridly engaging exploits, the pirate figure appealed to writers and readers for intellectual reasons. The Americas, including the Caribbean, opened imaginative space for moral and political philosophers to reimagine the fundamentals of human nature, the origins of civil society, and the best models for governance. Literary pirates proved to be exceptionally suitable to consideration of these issues. By "turning to account," or going rogue, literary pirates presented a kind of living experiment; their practice of exiting mainstream civil society and recreating alternative ones on their own terms allowed those who wrote about them to explore the fundamentals of human nature and the possibilities and limitations of civil organization at a time when these were pressing issues in Britain's literary and philosophical circles. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Richard Frohock to learn more about the impact pirates had on 18th Century literature.

Oklahoma State University professor takes hands-on approach to teach about aerospace propu...

Dr. Kurt Rouser graduated from the Air Force Academy in 1995. He immediately entered active-duty service as an Aerospace Engineer, where he worked on rockets and jet engines. After more than 20 years of service, he retired from the Air Force in 2016. His love of interacting with others and desire to share his real-world experience led him to becoming a professor in Oklahoma State University's Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering program, specializing in aerospace propulsion and power. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Rouser on preparing students to enter the workforce with relevant knowledge beyond their academic needs.

Oklahoma State University professor takes hands-on approach to teach about aerospace propu...

Oklahoma State University professor studies people's feelings on where our food comes from

How many people really care about the ethical treatment of the animals they eat? Oklahoma State University professor Dr. Bailey Norwood's research attempts to answer that question. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Norwood to learn more about people's dealings with animal welfare and how that impacts what meat they buy.

Oklahoma State University professor studies people's feelings on where our food comes from

How can instructional videos help develop the mind of learners?

You might think all secondary and undergraduate level mathematics teachers have the same base level of knowledge. However, that is not the case. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Michael Tallman, an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Oklahoma State University. His research investigates the relationship between teachers' subject knowledge and their pedagogical actions.

How studying the sea floor might help us understand future climates

Did you know a single celled organism, called foraminifera, can be studied to better understand past climates and environments? In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Ashley Burkett, an Assistant Professor of Geology at Oklahoma State University. Her research takes her to the ocean floor to collect foraminifera samples. She uses this information to understand how future climates might respond to trends.

Whose job is it to teach college students sexual health?

Historically, many stakeholders have been involved and/or created barriers to teaching college students about sexual health. Some of the most critical roles have been student affairs professionals. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Amber Manning-Ouellette, an Assistant Professor at Oklahoma State University. Her research examines the history of sexual health education in the United States and how we can work to break down the barriers.

Entrepreneurs can change society and shape the future, but most of them are wrong

Entrepreneurship is essential for economic growth and universal prosperity. But how entrepreneurship creates value is rarely understood. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Per Bylund about what entrepreneurs actually do and why they are the lifeblood of an economy.

Entrepreneurs can change society and shape the future, but most of them are wrong

Don't Bee Scared: Oklahoma State University awarded designation for bee conservation

In 2022, Oklahoma State became the first university in the state to be designated a certified Bee Campus. The certification creates a plan for communities to conserve pollinators and increase native plants. In this episode, Meghan Robinson speaks with Dr. Emily Geest to learn more about the criteria for becoming a certified Bee Campus.

Don't Bee Scared: Oklahoma State University awarded designation for bee conservation