Kinship With The More Than Human World In various cultures around the world, human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. The landscapes we call home — grasslands and forests, mountains and rocks, rivers and oceans — are shared by nonhuman beings who may be considered relatives. Age-old myths and modern science reinforce these kinship relationships. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions.In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of "kinship" in a special radio series. Leading scientists, philosophers and writers illuminate ways in which "personhood" transcends the human species and shows how kinship practices can deepen our care and respect for the more-than-human world.You can learn more about the series at TTBOOK.org/kinship
Kinship With The More Than Human World

Kinship With The More Than Human World

From Wisconsin Public Radio

In various cultures around the world, human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. The landscapes we call home — grasslands and forests, mountains and rocks, rivers and oceans — are shared by nonhuman beings who may be considered relatives. Age-old myths and modern science reinforce these kinship relationships. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions.In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of "kinship" in a special radio series. Leading scientists, philosophers and writers illuminate ways in which "personhood" transcends the human species and shows how kinship practices can deepen our care and respect for the more-than-human world.You can learn more about the series at TTBOOK.org/kinship

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Shapeshifting

There are old folktales and legends of people who can become animals. Animals who can become people. And there's a lesson for our own time in those shapeshifting stories — a recognition that the membrane between what's human and more-than-human is razor thin. Human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions. In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of "kinship" in a special radio series. To learn more about the Kinship series, head to ttbook.org/kinship. Original Air Date: November 20, 2021 Guests: Sharon Blackie — David Abram — Chris Gosden — Stephen Graham Jones Interviews In This Hour: Reclaiming the fierce women who are shapeshifters — How a man turned into a raven — Shapeshifters, shamans and the 'New Animism' — Horror author Stephen Graham Jones on what our monsters say about us

When Mountains Are Gods

If you look at a mountain, you might see a skiing destination, a climbing challenge, or even a source of timber to be logged or ore to be mined. But there was a time when mountains were sacred. In some places, they still are. What changes when you think of a mountain not as a giant accumulation of natural resources, but as a living being? Human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions. In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of "kinship" in a special radio series. To learn more about the Kinship series, head to ttbook.org/kinship. Original Air Date: July 24, 2021 Guests: John Hausdoerffer — Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk — David Hinton — Lisa Maria Madera Interviews In This Hour: What Do You Owe The Mountains Around You? — 'These Are Live, Active Places': A Ute Activist Fights To Save The Bears Ears National Monument — A Poet Finds Life Lessons on Hunger Mountain — 'I Was Born To Volcanoes'

Plants As Persons

Over the past decade, plant scientists have quietly transformed the way we think of trees, forests and plants. They discovered that trees communicate through vast underground networks, that plants learn and remember. If plants are intelligent beings, how should we relate to them? Do they have a place in our moral universe? Should they have rights? Human identity cannot be separated from our nonhuman kin. From forest ecology to the human microbiome, emerging research suggests that being human is a complicated journey made possible only by the good graces of our many companions. In partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation, To The Best Of Our Knowledge is exploring this theme of "kinship" in a special radio series. To learn more about the Kinship series, head to ttbook.org/kinship. Original Air Date: December 19, 2020 Guests: Robin Wall Kimmerer — Matt Hall — Monica Gagliano — Brooke Hecht Interviews In This Hour: We've Forgotten How To Listen To Plants — We Share This World With Plants. What Do We Owe Them? — Guided by Plant Voices — The Botanical Medicine Cabinet

Eye-To-Eye Animal Encounters

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Coming Soon: Kinship

When you think about your neighbors, your friends and family, do you consider the nonhuman relationships in your life? With the birds and trees, the rivers and hills around you? This idea of "kinship" with our plant and animal neighbors — and the broader ecosystem around us — is the focus of "Kinship With The More Than Human World," an eight-part podcast and radio series produced by TTBOOK in partnership with the Center for Humans and Nature and with support from the Kalliopeia Foundation. In this series, leading scientists, philosophers and writers illuminate ways in which "personhood" transcends the human species and shows how kinship practices can deepen our care and respect for the more-than-human world. You can learn more about the series at TTBOOK.org/kinship