Midwest Moxie The successes, failures, insights and opportunities that shape some of the Midwest's most exciting entrepreneurs. Host Kathleen Gallagher talks with company founders who are taking risks, disrupting the status quo and driving economic growth in the region.
Midwest Moxie

Midwest Moxie

From WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee's NPR

The successes, failures, insights and opportunities that shape some of the Midwest's most exciting entrepreneurs. Host Kathleen Gallagher talks with company founders who are taking risks, disrupting the status quo and driving economic growth in the region.

Most Recent Episodes

Virtual doctor visits and software quality control: Jon Pearce and Valarie King-Bailey

Jon Pearce got an internship with a startup while still in college, setting his path toward becoming a founder. Valarie King-Bailey spent more than 20 years working for other companies before starting one of her own. Despite different timelines, both found their calling.

Virtual doctor visits and software quality control: Jon Pearce and Valarie King-Bailey

Semiconductor chips and B2B marketing: Mo Faisal and Lindsay Tjepkema

Mo Faisal set out to build better and more energy efficient semiconductor chips. Lindsay Tjepkema wanted to update the business-to-business marketing playbook. Both founded startups to do it.

Enabling the healthcare revolution: Niko Skievaski

Niko Skievaski and his co-founders started building an interface for accessing health data so members of their coworking space could more easily grow their tech companies. But the interface itself turned out to be the basis for a scalable tech business that would provide a platform developers can use to build and distribute software that is revolutionizing healthcare.

Smart devices and smart software: Sridhar Deivasigamani and Zach Halmstad

Sridhar Deivasigamani knew the world was ready for smarter, more efficient water heaters. Zach Halmstad knew businesses needed more software tools to manage their Apple devices. It turns out that both of them were right.

Smart devices and smart software: Sridhar Deivasigamani and Zach Halmstad

Big bets and serial startups: Brian Wiegand and Craig Markovitz

Brian Wiegand started his first company in the early days of the internet, which he's been mining ever since. Craig Markovitz found his success with medical technologies. They share one important characteristic: A willingness to take risks — over and over again.

Rethinking transportation: Alisyn Malek

Alisyn Malek has impacted sustainability as an engineer and innovation leader at General Motors, as co-founder of self-driving shuttle startup May Mobility and now as head of the nonprofit Coalition for Reimagined Mobility. Her work has influenced not only how new transportation technologies are being developed, but how they are being integrated into our social fabric.

App development and plasmid DNA: Ankur Gopal and Michael Chambers

Ankur Gopal struck out into the world but returned home to Kentucky to start his companies. Michael Chambers stayed in North Dakota and built a high-growth company right there in his own backyard. Both of their home states have benefitted.

Building tech and fighting cancer: Christopher Day and Tom Gajewski

Christopher Day grew up in rural Indiana without much visibility into any career. Tom Gajewski grew up in Chicago with his eye on a medical career. Both became serial entrepreneurs.

Taking on the credit card industry: Jim McKelvey

Jim McKelvey was a nationally known glass blower, but blew past that accomplishment to grow an even bigger reputation with Square. The company Jim co-founded forever changed the credit card industry, and perhaps even more amazingly, successfully fended off competition from Amazon.

Coffee meetings and phishing attacks: Taralinda Willis and Norman Sadeh

Taralinda Willis never imagined she would start a company; Norman Sadeh never imagined he wouldn't. Despite those different perspectives, both founded startups and built them into successful businesses.