Tapped This is Tapped, a podcast where we tell our stories - the stories of people living with the cost of drought in the Southwest, and what we can do to mitigate it.
Tapped

Tapped

From Arizona Public Media

This is Tapped, a podcast where we tell our stories - the stories of people living with the cost of drought in the Southwest, and what we can do to mitigate it.

Most Recent Episodes

Navigating murky waters: how laws and regulations can hinder tribal initiatives

In this Tapped episode, Katya Mendoza and Paola Rodriguez explore the history of the Havasupai people's fight to stop uranium mining near the Grand Canyon and why they worry about water contamination.

Navigating murky waters: how laws and regulations can hinder tribal initiatives

A generational battle: How a tribe's concern over mining contamination on ancestral homela...

For people who visit or call Grand Canyon National Park home, the water issues mainly come around moving water up to the rim where the homes, hotels, and other businesses sit. But, head downstream to one of the most remote tribal nations in America, and the water issues are very different. The Havasupai people's land sits in the canyon, surrounded on all sides by the park. They're not worried about pumping the water up. Their worries are about what trickles down. Upstream from them sits an area where uranium mining was once plentiful. And that atomic-age history is causing concerns about water quality.

A generational battle: How a tribe's concern over mining contamination on ancestral homela...

An unprecedented water line in an unprecedented place

In this Tapped episode, Danyelle Khmara delves into the Grand Canyon's water infrastructure challenges and the extraordinary Transcanyon Waterline upgrade, highlighting the complexities of delivering clean water in this iconic natural wonder.

When a reservoir is more than stored water

Lake Powell is the reason Page, Arizona exists. The city of 7,500 started as a work camp for those building Glen Canyon Dam. Today, the lake and dam provide the it with water and electricity, and lake-related business accounts for about three-quarters of its taxbase. So how does the ebb and flow of the lake's main source of water, the Colorado River, affect life in Page?

Water and housing redux

The story of a home development in Cochise County has taken a second big turn since we published Episode 4 of this series, so Summer Hom is back with the latest on this ongoing saga.

Water and copper

We wrap up our look at the 5 Cs of Arizona's economy with an examination of copper. The state is dotted with towns that at some point relied on mineral extraction for jobs. And that industry's historical practices around water use have reflected the state's feelings about both natural resources, whether it's dropping slag into rivers in the early-to-mid 1900s or efforts to squeeze and treat every drop of water out of today's tailings. How does this stalwart of Arizona's economy compare to others when it comes to water use?

Update on Episode 4

Hi, Tapped listeners. Our last episode mentioned issues around the adjudication of just how much water should be guaranteed to run through the San Pedro River. At the time we were reporting, that amount had not been quantified. But it now has. While we haven't combed through the details yet, you can get updates as we follow this story at news.azpm.org

Water and housing

Climate has always been the most nebulous of Arizona's 5 Cs. The most common thought of what it refers to is the mild winters and low humidity that, unless you're in the mountains, dominate the state. Winter weather that often requires little more than a sweater often entices northerners when Jack Frost is doing a little more than nipping at their noses. As people relocate to Arizona, it brings a need for increased housing and thus a need for more residential water consumption. As the state deals with concerns about water and homebuilding, we head to a part of the state that has been battling such concerns for nearly two decades to learn about two long, protracted battles over building houses while trying to keep a river alive.

Why is alfalfa one of Arizona's biggest crops?

Children in Arizona are often taught the 5 Cs that traditionally made up the state's economy: Cattle, Citrus, Climate, Copper and Cotton. As the state of our water supply changes, what's happening to those longtime industries? Tapped begins a mini-series looking to answer that question with an episode on agriculture, the economic sector that includes three of those five Cs. Is the industry that accounts 72% of the state's water consumption using its supply of water wisely?

How water gets to (most of) us

Most of us get our water from a utility company, be it a large municipal one or a small private entity. This week, we look at the work that one small company does to keep the water flowing, and what happened when another utility had a big problem.