Underground History Chelsea Rose, historical archaeologist and research faculty member at Southern Oregon University discusses historical findings in this region and beyond.
Underground History

Underground History

From Jefferson Public Radio

Chelsea Rose, historical archaeologist and research faculty member at Southern Oregon University discusses historical findings in this region and beyond.

Most Recent Episodes

An archeologist shares the wonders of our National Park System through LEGOs

Lego National Park Vignette by Gavin the Lego National Park Ranger What began as an effort to get signatures in support of a LEGO set to honor the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, has grown into a National Park Service LEGO Vignettes social media account, with 20,000 followers on Instagram and over 70,000 on Facebook. The mysterious man behind the LEGO curtain, Gavin the LEGO Park Ranger joins Underground History with host Chelsea Rose to talk about this innovative outreach effort.

An archeologist shares the wonders of our National Park System through LEGOs

A new way of thinking about museum pieces: decolonizing them

Generations of people walked through museums--and still do--looking at items used by the people who used to live on the land around us. But their descendants are still around, and the items may still have uses. You might not want to use a basket from hundreds of years ago, but similar baskets are still made and used by Native American people. And indigenous people are talking to museums about "decolonizing" their collections, to think of items as "belongings" instead of "artifacts." Grand Ronde Tribal Member and traditional basket weaver, Stephanie Craig We explore the concept further in the latest edition of our Underground History podcast, a joint project with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology. Chelsea Rose of SOULA talks to Grand Ronde Tribal Member Stephanie Craig, who teaches basket weaving skills. She explains the evolving thinking about what physical items represent, and how and even if they should be displayed.

Digging into the remarkably deep history of plastic

After the third little plastic ketchup packet, do you start to wonder if all that plastic is really necessary? Civilization as we know it has come to depend heavily upon plastic, and research shows little bits of plastic have gotten into just about everything... including our bodies. Plastic has been around for long enough to be the focus of some archaeology. Underground History, our joint podcast with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, explores plastic, and its ubiquity, in a new edition. Chelsea Rose from SOULA chats with Kimberly Wooten, a Historical Archaeologist who works in the Cultural Studies Office at Cal Trans, the California Department of Transportation.

A short history of really toxic stuff in some everyday items, like clothing

The labels on products today make our choices easier. If it says "non-toxic," it's probably okay to use. But back in our grandparents' time--maybe our great-grandparents'--labeling was not as good, AND all kinds of toxic substances went into everyday products. The stuff that made old hats stiff? Mercury. The lovely green in Victorian dresses? Arsenic. The list goes on, and Chelsea Rose takes note of it in the latest edition of Underground History, our joint venture with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology. Chelsea visits with Averie Foster, an occupational health consultant at Oregon OSHA. The conversation gets into potential hazards, and not just in museums; you may have some toxic heirlooms in the attic at home.

A short history of really toxic stuff in some everyday items, like clothing

Who knows what lurks in the old bottles we dig up?

It's exciting enough when archaeological digs produce finds like old bottles. Once in a while, there's that super-rare find of a bottle that still has something in it. That's both exciting and potentially dangerous, and the zone in which we find University of Idaho archaeologist Mark S. Warner and his colleague, the chemist Ray von Wandruszka. They examine the contents of old bottles, from the time when people used things like arsenic and mercury as medicines (eek). In the latest edition of Underground History, Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology's Chelsea Rose visits with Warner and von Wandruszka about the things they find in the old bottles. Bring a strong stomach.

The religious history of why we eat what we eat

We can feel nostalgia for our childhood foods, from Friday's fried fish to Aunt Barbara's egg salad casserole, without understanding what brought those recipes to the table. We trace the path backward in the latest installment of our Underground History podcast. Food historian Christina Ward explores the intersection of religion, history, psychology, and food in her book, Holy Food: How Cults, Communes and Religious Movements Influenced What We Eat – An American History. She joins UH host and SOU Laboratory of Anthropology Director, Chelsea Rose to talk about her book and how new ideas about religion gave us new ideas about eating and drinking.

Beyond the vintage pictures: 'imaging' the Modoc War

The fascination with the Modoc War in the Klamath Basin continues, more than a century and a half after it ended (1871-72). It was a big news story in its time, and resulted in death for some Modocs, exile to Oklahoma for others. The latest edition of our Underground History podcast, hosted by Chelsea Rose at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, takes up recent efforts to further understand the war in the Lava Beds. Klamath Falls archeologist Dan Broockmann, and Ken Sandusky of the Modoc Tribe talk about efforts to "image" archaeological sites, so that Modoc Nation members in Oklahoma can "experience" their ancestral homelands. Chelsea gets further details in a visit with our guests. For more information here's a link to a previous JX conversation about the Modoc War, with Klamath County Museum Curator Matt Voelkel and Modoc Nation Resource and Development Director Ken Sandusky. https://www.ijpr.org/show/the-jefferson-exchange/2023-06-05/tue-9-am-looking-back-on-the-modoc-war-from-150-years-later

How the post office got so involved in a murder investigation in the Siskiyous

This week (October 11) marks the 100th anniversary of one of the region's most notorious crimes: the botched robbery of a Southern Pacific passenger train that led to a quadruple murder in the Siskiyous, and a national manhunt for the killers. We explore the event and the aftermath in our Underground History podcast, including a live event on Wednesday at Ashland Hills Inn. In this edition of the podcast, host Chelsea Rose from the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology takes up the postal angle on the Tragedy at Tunnel 13. The first person killed was the clerk in the mail car on the train, and the Postal Inspection Service and the Postal Museum at the Smithsonian Institution have long memories about the crime. Chelsea visits with reps from each agency about the long shadow of that October day in 1923.

How the post office got so involved in a murder investigation in the Siskiyous

Underground History focuses on The Tragedy at Tunnel 13 near Ashland

The 100th anniversary of a notable American crime is approaching. It was on October 11, 1923 that three young men--brothers--attempted to hold up a Southern Pacific passenger train at Tunnel 13, under the road to Mount Ashland. The robbery failed, and the DeAutremont Brothers ended up killing four members of the train crew. A special live edition of Underground History will be held at Ashland Hills Inn on October 11th, and Chelsea Rose is covering several aspects of the incident in the UH podcasts. The tracking of the murderers involved some of the first uses of what we know today as forensic science. And Ashland is home to a federal laboratory using such science to investigate crimes involving animals. Barry Baker, the Deputy Director of the lab, talks about the growth of the science from a century-old tragedy.

Digging into the Oregon version of The Gold Rush

When we speak of The Gold Rush in American history, we usually mean the one in California, following the discovery of gold in 1849. That one still gets the headlines, but Oregon also had a significant gold mining history, and mining goes on--on a smaller scale--today. Underground History, our joint project with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, explores the efforts to unearth Oregon Gold Rush artifacts. Chelsea Rose from SOULA recorded this UH segment in the field, visiting with several people involved in the process, to talk about tools and techniques.