Take Care A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.
Take Care

Take Care

From WRVO

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.More from Take Care »

Most Recent Episodes

Latest in health: tech for your home, making a city age-friendly

For today's latest in health segment, we look at ways to make services more accessible to seniors both in and out of the home.

Making it through your later years, one transition at a time

If you look back on your life, you can probably pick out a few major transitions: from high school to college or maybe from one job to another. The transitions experienced as we reach our later years can sometimes be more complex. Carol Levine joins us today on "Take Care" to discuss common transitions in old age, including Medicare. Levine is the director of the Families and Health Care Project at the United Hospital Fund, called " Next Step in Care ." She is also the author of the recent AARP

Senolytics: Living healthier for longer with a new class of drugs

Cellular senescence — when stress causes cells to change their function in the body — is common and sometimes harmful in older adults, but scientists are working on medications that can help kill them. Senolytics drugs can selectively induce death of senescent cells. Dr. Judith Campisi , a researcher and professor of biogerontology at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging , joins us today on "Take Care" to explain this new class of drugs and their potential use. She said senolytic drugs

Helping young mothers one door at a time

How do you help mothers and babies in need? One door at a time. WBFO's Avery Schneider spent an afternoon in an upstate New York neighborhood to see how a local agency does it.

Latest in health: algorithms for diagnosing disease, the health lab of the future

For today's latest in health segment, we look at solutions for two different kinds of patients — one for those with genetic diseases and another for healthy people looking to stay that way. First, we start with a new algorithm that could improve the diagnosis of rare diseases. Second, we look at a New York City lab that educates patients on making healthy lifestyle changes.

Latest in health: algorithms for diagnosing disease, the health lab of the future

Shift toward value-based health care models not without problems

For some people, their yearly checkup is as easy as heading downstairs on their lunch break, as some companies are moving toward health care methods that put the physicians closer to the workers. That does not necessarily mean, though, that health care has improved at these companies, an author and health director said. Carolyn Engelhard , director of the Health Policy Program in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine , co-authored the book

Does intuitive eating and dieting have to be all or nothing?

With seemingly a new fad diet coming out every week, a recent movement has turned to anti-dieting, focusing more on wellness rather than weight. The best approach, though, may be a middle ground individualized to what each person needs, according to a registered dietitian-nutritionist. Samantha Cassetty is a contributing nutritionist for NBC News Better . In her article "Is the anti-diet movement leading us astray?" , she said there are a lot of good ideas to take away from the anti-diet

When aging reduces your ability to bounce back, try something new and exciting

A growing trend in high-stress, demanding jobs is the "positive stress movement," when people expose themselves to extreme temperatures, diets and exercise as a way to improve longevity. At Palo Alto Investors, though, the focus is on a far less radical approach to helping us perform better for longer. Dr. Joon Yun is a physician and the president and managing partner of Palo Alto Investors, LLC . He also created and sponsored the Palo Alto Longevity Prize , launched in 2014, which provides a $1

When aging reduces your ability to bounce back, try something new and exciting

Endurance: Why mind and body matters

When it comes to endurance, do you think it's all in your head? Maybe with a little more mental power the body can achieve anything. Although your brain plays a crucial roll, the relationship between mind and body is what matters most when it comes to endurance, according to our next guest, an author, journalist and runner. Alex Hutchinson is the author of the book "Endure: Mind, Body and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance." He started out as a middle/long-distance runner for the

Extremes in health and wellness

Health and wellness is a popular topic these days. It's not just exercising or eating well anymore. With increased interest comes some new ideas – and new research to back them up. Some of those ideas can seem a little extreme. That's what we're exploring this time on "Take Care," tune in for more on health and wellness extremes. You'll hear discussions on new algorithms to help diagnose rare disease, the idea of "positive stress" and what it means for our longevity, why the anti-diet movement

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