Inside Appalachia Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.
Inside Appalachia

Inside Appalachia

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.

Most Recent Episodes

'He Died In Terror' - Thousands of U.S. Workers Die Each Year, Leaving Families With Questions

What is the human impact of a failure to prioritize workplace safety? In this episode, we'll explore how weak regulatory laws, and a failure to prioritize worker safety, may be contributing to more deaths, and a higher risk of workplace accidents — both at the state and national levels.

'He Died In Terror' - Thousands of U.S. Workers Die Each Year, Leaving Families With Questions

How Mountains Influence Our Lives: Inside Appalachia

"Montani Semper Liberi ⁠— Mountaineers Are Always Free" is West Virginia's state motto, but it is more than that. It is a belief system that is not just true about the Mountain State. It rings true throughout Appalachia and even mountains on other continents. On this episode of Inside Appalachia, we'll take a look at how the natural environment has influenced our lives.

A Response to 'Hillbilly Elegy' by Appalachian Writers: Inside Appalachia

"Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis", a personal memoir by JD Vance, was on the New York Times Bestseller list for 24 weeks. After the 2016 presidential election, some people read the book hoping to gain insights into the region. It sold more than a million copies, and a Ron Howard film is now in the works. West Virginia University Press recently published a new book called "Appalachian Reckoning: A Region Responds to Hillbilly Elegy." The book includes essays, poetry

A Response to 'Hillbilly Elegy' by Appalachian Writers: Inside Appalachia

Politics, Apple Butter, and Talking to Each Other Across the Aisle

This week on Inside Appalachia, we're taking another listen to an episode we aired last winter. With the political season heating up, we probably all need another reminder. We're wading into the American political divide and bringing you voices with distinct points of view from opposite sides of the country. It's no secret that these days, we live in the divided states of America. Sometimes, it can feel like the only thing that unites us anymore is that now-nearly universal experience of sitting

Farmers Across Appalachia Get New Customers Through Craft Beer Craze

People in Appalachia have made spirits for hundreds of years. Some people even say Appalachians are among the best at making whiskey and moonshine. But this history is sometimes coupled with negative stereotypes. Outsiders have long portrayed Appalachians as dangerous, lawless moonshiners.

Without Enough Support, Working Moms Struggle to Make Breastfeeding Work

Doctors point to overwhelming evidence that breast milk is superior to formula. But breastfeeding rates in the United States continue to be low. Reasons for that may be lack of paid maternity leave in the U.S., challenges breastfeeding at work, the role of WIC in subsidizing formula and the fact that for many women, breastfeeding, although natural, is a learned skill and there aren't enough people teaching techniques. In this episode more than a dozen women will share their stories about

Without Enough Support, Working Moms Struggle to Make Breastfeeding Work

Stories of Love, Friendship and Loss from StoryCorps: Inside Appalachia

StoryCorps producers brought their mobile recording studio to Charleston, West Virginia, in fall 2018, and recorded more than 100 stories. These recording are between friends, co-workers and family members. StoryCorps' mission is to preserve and share humanity's stories to build connections between people and create a more just and compassionate world. These recordings will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in the largest collection of oral histories in the

Inside Appalachia Expands to Tell More Stories of Folklife, and the 'Art of Everyday Life'

In this week's episode of Inside Appalachia, we explore how our cultural traditions change over time and evolve as they get passed from person to person. How does foklife fit into our already busy, and frankly, quite stressful lives? "Henry Glassie, another folklorist, says that folklore is the creation of the future out of the past. So in order to know where we're headed, we have to know about these traditions in the past," explained West Virginia state folklorist Emily Hilliard.

Inside Appalachia Expands to Tell More Stories of Folklife, and the 'Art of Everyday Life'

'It's Just Really Hard'- Families and Caregivers Struggle to Find Resources Inside Appalachia

Across most of central Appalachia, the population is declining as young people leave to find work. Those who stay, are rapidly aging. In West Virginia, for instance, about 16 percent of the population is 65 or older, according to a Department of Health and Human Resources report. Seniors are expected to be about a quarter of the total population by 2030.

'It's Just Really Hard'- Families and Caregivers Struggle to Find Resources Inside Appalachia

'It Was a Terrible Loss': School Closures and Their Effect on Communities Inside Appalachia

This week on Inside Appalachia, basketball was a big deal for the small town of Northfork, in McDowell County, West Virginia. The high school team won the state championship eight years in a row.

'It Was a Terrible Loss': School Closures and Their Effect on Communities Inside Appalachia

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