Inside Appalachia Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.
Inside Appalachia

Inside Appalachia

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.

Most Recent Episodes

Fierce Women Of Appalachia In Story And Song

This week's episode of Inside Appalachia is about fierce women — something we have no shortage of here in Appalachia.We'll hear about the folk music collaboration between Wu Fei and Abigail Washburn. Their new album combines the tones of Appalachia with the melodies of China. We'll also hear a story about the first transgender person elected to political office in West Virginia, and a 90-year-old newspaper publisher who is still hard at work each week.

Looking At Black Lung And Racism In The Mountains

In Appalachia, we're all too familiar with black lung disease, and how it takes the breath away from coal miners. For a time, it seemed black lung was going away, thanks to tougher mine safety regulations. Now it's seeing a resurgence.There is another problem that doesn't seem to have gone away, either, and that is racism. It shows itself in places you never would have thought of, including in the names given to rock climbing routes in West Virginia's New River Gorge.

Reconnecting To Our Roots Through Pawpaws, And Revisiting Indigenous History Inside Appalachia

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we'll take a look at a fruit that is unique to Appalachia called the pawpaw. It was nearly forgotten but is coming back as some people are working to keep it alive. We also hear an interview with author Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle. Her new novel explores the Eastern Band of Cherokee's history, and the push and pull to leave and return home. And we learn about a group of rock climbers who are trying to rename climbing routes that bear racist and sexist names.

Reconnecting To Our Roots Through Pawpaws, And Revisiting Indigenous History Inside Appalachia

The Power Of Storytelling, Nature, And Elk Inside Appalachia

It's safest to avoid cramped public places, and when you're hanging out with friends, experts say do it outside. Get some fresh air. We've got plenty of that here Inside Appalachia. Even as the weather changes we have an abundance of wildness to explore. And today, we're celebrating that wildness.

Artists Adjusting During COVID, Dinosaur Kingdom, And Remembering Elaine Purkey

Inside Appalachia reports on how potters, painters, writers, and action-figure makers, are adjusting during the coronavirus pandemic. We remember Elaine Purkey, one of West Virginia's most powerful social activists and musicians, who passed away from COVID-19. And check in with artist Robert Villamagna who is battling COVID-19 himself.

Artists Adjusting During COVID, Dinosaur Kingdom, And Remembering Elaine Purkey

'Country Roads' Take Me Inside Appalachia

This episode of Inside Appalachia is about returning home. For some people, timing and circumstance force you back. It is only then that you realize how much you missed home. Others spend decades longing to return.

7 Stories About Appalachians Who Find Solutions And Rekindle Traditions

National stories about Appalachia sometimes overlook the people who are working on the ground to solve problems in their communities. This episode of Inside Appalachia highlights the work of several people who are thinking outside the box to find solutions.

When Strangers With Cameras Travel Inside Appalachia

What happens when strangers with cameras come to Appalachia? It's a complicated topic that many Appalachians have strong feelings about. We're taking another listen to an episode we aired in 2015, but it seems like this issue never goes away.

Finding Economic Resilience In Appalachian And Western Coal Communities

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we are listening back to a show that originally aired in 2018. It's about poverty. Appalachia is not the only place in America where some people live in extreme poverty. But several communities here are among the poorest.

How Appalachians Are Finding Strength, Peace, And Sobriety During A Pandemic (Hint: Community)

Human beings are social creatures, but the pandemic is making it difficult to interact with one another. It is also bringing to light just how important human connection is in our lives.

How Appalachians Are Finding Strength, Peace, And Sobriety During A Pandemic (Hint: Community)

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