Valley Public Radio News Local and statewide news coverage from Valley Public Radio
Valley Public Radio News

Valley Public Radio News

From Valley Public Radio

Local and statewide news coverage from Valley Public Radio

Most Recent Episodes

The Future Of Valley Politics In A Post-Trump Era

The transfer of U.S. presidential power from Trump to Biden, and the confirmation of Kamala Harris as vice president, has had political ripple effects stretching to California and the San Joaquin Valley. To discuss what has changed in our political landscape, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke to Dezie Woods-Jones, California state president of Black Women Organized for Political Action and former vice mayor of Oakland, Ben Christopher, political reporter for Calmatters, and Lisa Bryant,

Fresno State Poetry Slam Celebrates Spoken Word In The African American Community

The Henry Madden Library at Fresno State is celebrating the tradition of spoken word poetry in the African American community with the " Lift Every Voice " virtual poetry slam Thursday, January 28 at 7 p.m. The event will be hosted by former Fresno Poet Laureate Bryan Medina. Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke to Medina about the event and the power of poetry to help us mark seminal moments in our history.

Fresno State Poetry Slam Celebrates Spoken Word In The African American Community

COVID-19 Is Wreaking Havoc In State Hospitals, Too – Virus Update For Jan. 15

In the months since the pandemic began, COVID-19 has taken a tremendous toll on hospitals, where bedspace is at a minimum and staff are overworked , and prisons, where tight living quarters and mixed enforcement of safety precautions have left incarcerated people vulnerable to soaring infections . But the virus is also wreaking havoc in facilities that fall somewhere in between, known as state hospitals . In California's six state hospitals, where convicted felons serve additional time after

COVID-19 Is Wreaking Havoc In State Hospitals, Too – Virus Update For Jan. 15

Mark Arax On What The Valley Reveals About The Radicalization Of The Right

The man who carried a Confederate flag inside the U.S. Capitol during last week's insurrection was arrested yesterday for an act that served as a reminder that the roots of our country's divisions run deep. The now infamous images of him walking through the Capitol with the flag resting causally on his shoulder raise questions about the history of the Confederacy, not just in the South, but also here in the Central Valley. To learn more about that legacy, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock

Mark Arax On What The Valley Reveals About The Radicalization Of The Right

Fresno City College Student Film Explores Life During A Pandemic

The bubonic plague ripped through London in the mid 1660s, and a famous account of one man's experience living through that pandemic became the source of inspiration for Fresno City College students living through this one. Students, instructors and community members teamed up to produce "Plague Diaries, Short Films of Life in the Pandemic," which premieres tonight at 7 p.m. on the Fresno City College website . To learn more about the project Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with Chuck

Fresno County Fairgrounds Clinic To Vaccinate 1,500 People Per Day Against COVID-19

A COVID-19 vaccine clinic at the Fresno County Fairgrounds is now equipped to administer 1,500 shots per day, according to county officials during a press conference on Tuesday . The clinic, which began operating at reduced capacity on January 6, is open to healthcare workers in Phase 1A of the state's vaccination schedule , as well as individuals 75 years or older. Appointments are required. Combined with other clinics still being developed, the county could eventually offer as many as 3,000

Fresno County Fairgrounds Clinic To Vaccinate 1,500 People Per Day Against COVID-19

In Kings County, One Of Every Nine Residents Has Contracted COVID-19

More than six percent of Californians have now contracted COVID-19 since the pandemic began, but in one San Joaquin Valley county, the case rate is almost twice as high. According to county and state data, 18,110 people in Kings County have contracted COVID-19 since March , a total that's equivalent to more than 11 percent of residents, or one in nine. Only in two California counties, Lassen and Imperial , has COVID-19 infected a higher share of residents. One reason for Kings County's high

Family of Coalinga State Hospital Resident Says They Weren't Told He Died—Or That He Had COVID-19

In late December, Clementine Sanders called her son at Coalinga State Hospital to make sure he had received her Christmas card. That's when his bunkmates informed her that her son, 58-year-old Shannon Starr, had died three weeks earlier. "I was just totally shocked," she says. "Nobody called me." Since then, she says, none of her messages to staff or reception have been returned. "I still wasn't notified and I still haven't heard from the [hospital]," she says. When Sanders and her daughter

Family of Coalinga State Hospital Resident Says They Weren't Told He Died—Or That He Had COVID-19

Three Weeks In, Valley's Vaccine Distribution Falls Short Of Goals—COVID-19 Update For Jan. 8, 2021

A month after COVID-19 infections began to surge following the Thanksgiving holiday, the virus continues to devastate the San Joaquin Valley. Hospitals are reporting more patients with COVID-19 than ever, intensive care units continue to report only a handful of open beds each day, and hundreds of healthcare workers who could otherwise be caring for patients or staffing medical facilities are currently unable to work after either testing positive for the virus or entering quarantine following a

Three Weeks In, Valley's Vaccine Distribution Falls Short Of Goals—COVID-19 Update For Jan. 8, 2021

Journalists Investigate Why So Few Farmworkers With COVID-19 Isolate In Free Hotels

In an effort to assist farmworkers who test positive for COVID-19, California launched the Housing for the Harvest program. It provides free hotel rooms so farmworkers can self-isolate and not infect family members. But a recent investigation found that of the 800,000 farmworkers in California, only around 80 have utilized the program since it was announced in July. To learn more, Valley Edition Host Kathleen Schock spoke with the journalists behind that investigation, Jackie Botts, economic

Journalists Investigate Why So Few Farmworkers With COVID-19 Isolate In Free Hotels

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