You Bet Your Garden An hour of "chemical-free horticultural hijinks," You Bet Your Garden is a weekly, nationally syndicated Public Radio show airing out of WHYY-FM in Philadelphia that offers fiercely organic advice to gardeners far and wide.
You Bet Your Garden

You Bet Your Garden

From WHYY

An hour of "chemical-free horticultural hijinks," You Bet Your Garden is a weekly, nationally syndicated Public Radio show airing out of WHYY-FM in Philadelphia that offers fiercely organic advice to gardeners far and wide.More from You Bet Your Garden »

Most Recent Episodes

Crossing The Pond with the Intent to Commit Horticulture

It's often a bad idea to take plants across state lines with the intent to commit horticulture. On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath discusses what's at stake if you're thinking of crossing The Pond with your plants! Plus, gardening for the curious with Dr. Lee Reich. Question of the Week: I teach high school German & Spanish and run a reciprocal group exchange program with a teacher in Munich, Bavaria. (Bavaria is to Germany like Texas is to the US—very big, very conservative, very interesting & a lot of fun.) Because of my affinity for hydrangeas I came up with an idea I hope you will find interesting enough to help with. When I'm in Munich (the capital of Bavaria) later this July, I want to give my foreign exchange counterpart Veit (pronounced like "fight") and his new wife Effi a hydrangea (specifically hydrangea macrophylla bavaria), and take cuttings from it home with me, so that after the cuttings take root, we will effectively be sharing the same hydrangea plant across two continents. The root of the problem (pun intended � is that Google as I may, I can't seem to find out who to ask about bringing those cuttings home, as I believe it is highly frowned upon to bring plants into the US without going through proper channels. If you could help me, I would be ever grateful—and invite you to one of my wife's outstanding dinners during Veit's next visit this fall. "Danke schön". PS: If you think the cuttings might not be viable after transatlantic flights, I could probably just buy two identical plants, which might be clones anyway. —Chad in New Hanover Township, PA The legality of globetrotting hydrangeas »

Keep Your Credit Cards Out of the Compost!

A British gardening magazine recommends pouring grass clippings on top of shredded paper to make "quick compost." On You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath reveals what's wrong with this picture and re-iterates the rules of non-bogus black gold brewing. Plus, your fabulous phone calls! Question of the Week: I was just watching a "Florabest Lawnmower" video at the Facebook page for "The English Garden Magazine"; and the host used grass clippings and shredded paper 'to make a quick compost'. I know you always recommend mulching grass back into the lawn, but there have been times when my grass grew so fast and tall that I needed to bag it. I only have two small trees, so there are no dried leaves for me to rake up in the fall and use. Is it okay to add shredded copier paper and credit card advertisements to my compost pile? I compost a lot of 'green' veggie waste and egg shells. —Judy in New Jersey Keep your credit cards out of the compost!

The Many Foes of Roses

What's eating your roses? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath dons his detective's cap to pinpoint the perpetrator chewing on them now...and details how to stop Japanese beetles from finishing the job later. Plus, your fabulous phone calls! Question of the Week: I'm fairly new to roses, so I planted three 'Knockout' variety roses I've been assured I cannot kill. But it appears that something still finds the leaves very tasty. I've attached a picture. What is eating my leaves and is there anything I can do to stop it? I haven't seen any Japanese beetles and it seems like whatever is happening happens overnight. —Sarah in Virginia What's eating those roses?

Gardening Without Sight

Gardening for the disabled includes plantings for those with little to no sight. On the next You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath discusses gardens that appeal to the other four senses. Plus, your fabulous phone calls! Question of the week: I'd like to hear Mike talk about handicapped gardeners. I went completely blind several years ago and I'd love a segment on this topic. —John in Ocean Pines, Maryland Visually impaired gardeners share their stories»

Gardening Against the Odds: High Altitude, Short Season, and No Water

How can you grow tomatoes in a short season...at high altitude...and with no water? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath reveals just how they do it in Southwest Colorado! Plus, the wild and wonderful world of succulents and cacti...and your fabulous phone calls. Learn all about gardening in a hostile climate »

Do Trees NEED Mulch? & Can a Tree Survive Severed Roots?

Do trees really NEED mulch? And can their roots be safely severed during construction? On the latest You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath reveals some surprising truths about trees. Plus: Square Foot Gardening legend Mel Bartholomew, and your fabulous phone calls! Question of the Week: I'm about to put an addition on my house that will require a foundation being built approximately six to eight feet from a well-established maple tree that's about 30 to 40 feet high. The builder says there's a chance the tree will die when the roots are cut during trenching. Is there anything I can do to help increase the tree's odds of survival? —Mia in Yellow Springs, OH Can Mia's tree be saved?

Special Report: Moderating Menacing Mosquitoes

On this week's You Bet Your Garden, host Mike McGrath speaks with Dr. Dina Fonseca, professor of entomology in the school of public health at Rutgers University, about ways to prevent mosquito's from thriving in your landscape and ways to protect yourself from being bit. This way for tips to banish bloodsuckers »

You Say Potato, I Say Tomato

You say tomato, I say tomahto...but the soil sprouts potatoes! On the latest You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath discusses what you can do when Yukon Golds emerge right next to your Cherokee Purples. Plus: helping HOAs become more sustainable, and your fabulous phone calls. Question of the Week: Is it true that you shouldn't plant tomatoes and potatoes close to each other? In rotating my garden areas, I planted tomatoes where potatoes were last year. Now a couple of overlooked potatoes are starting to sprout up. Do I need to dig them out of the soil? —Mary in Oakdale, California Mike's advice »

What's Not to Love About the Linden Tree?

The linden tree is slow-growing, has great fall color and produces beautiful, scented flowers in the Summer. On the latest You Bet Your Garden¸ Mike McGrath discusses the linden and why it isn't used more often in the American landscape. Plus, your fabulous phone calls. Question of the Week: The Linden is a beautiful tree. (Berliners in Germany sure love it!) A couple of gorgeous specimens are at the library in Swarthmore, PA. Why is the Linden not used more? And why is it rarely encountered in local nurseries? —John in Doylestown, PA Learn more about the linden »

None Like it Hot: Even Sun-Lovers May Need Some Shade

Summer sun is good for our plants–up to a point. On the next You Bet Your Garden, Mike McGrath gives the lowdown on where and when your tomatoes might like you to throw them some shade. Plus: your fabulous phone calls! Question of the Week: "Greetings! I used to garden when I was much younger and I'm ready to try again now that I understand more of the do's and don'ts. One thing you will find though, if you come here in the summer, is that it can get swelteringly hot. I plan to do some extensive container gardening in my treeless (and nearly shade-less) backyard, specifically tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, and zucchini. What can be done to help my poor plants get through the hottest times of the year? P.S.: your online questions and answers have already helped me get a leg up on my preparations! Thanks!" —Matthew in Memphis, Tennessee How much sun is too much?

Back To Top