The Environment Report A Michigan-based environmental news report that comes to you twice a week.
The Environment Report

The Environment Report

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A Michigan-based environmental news report that comes to you twice a week.More from The Environment Report »

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Retired DEQ staffer: "Politics have become a much bigger part of what's driving the DEQ."

In Michigan, we have laws in place that give the state the power to essentially rope off polluted areas instead of cleaning them up. Instead, those laws tell the public: don't drink the water or build your house here. Sometimes these sites are cleaned up to a certain point and sometimes they're just left polluted with some measures in place to control the risks. Through a public records request, we've found that there are now more than 2,000 sites like this in Michigan. You can learn more about

Retired DEQ staffer: "Politics have become a much bigger part of what's driving the DEQ."

In 1994, Michigan OK'd partial pollution cleanups. Now we have 2,000 contaminated sites.

At more than 1,600 sites across the state of Michigan, you can't drink the groundwater. Well, you could, but it wouldn't be safe or legal.

In 1994, Michigan OK'd partial pollution cleanups. Now we have 2,000 contaminated sites.

When it comes to the Michigan DEQ, does public comment even matter?

Earlier this month, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality approved a permit that allows the Nestle Corporation to pump up to 400 gallons of groundwater per minute to feed its bottled water operations in Osceola County.

Forecasting spring migration to help birds avoid collisions

People who study birds are now using radar to make maps that can forecast migration at night. They say these maps could help by reducing the number of birds that collide with buildings and wind turbines.

Study: Class of flame retardant chemicals declines in kids' blood

Flame retardant chemicals are in our furniture, in carpet padding, electronics and car seats, but they don't stay put. They leach out of these products and get into our bodies. Some of these chemicals, called polybrominated diphenyl ethers or PBDEs, were phased out of use starting in 2004. A new study in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology finds levels of PBDEs in kids' blood have been declining.

Detroit suburb says it's "paying for the sins" of MDEQ in Flint water crisis, sues state

Jennifer Gilchrist moved from New York City back home to the Detroit suburb of Beverly Hills in 2016. She moved to help take care of her mom Joellen, a retired Detroit high school teacher, and to fix up her childhood home. That's when a plumber told them they had a lead service line.

Detroit suburb says it's "paying for the sins" of MDEQ in Flint water crisis, sues state

Another reason why green lakes are not a good sign

When you think about greenhouse gasses that are driving our warming climate, maybe you think about power plants or your car. But lakes can release greenhouse gasses, too, and the amount of nutrients that get into lakes from farms and cities matters.

20% of American diets have the highest carbon footprint

Just 20% of Americans are responsible for 46% of the food-related greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. That's one of the findings of a new study in the journal Environmental Research Letters .

What will we replace coal with?

The President of the United States says coal is coming back, but in reality coal is going away. The fight is over what will replace it. Even utilities are dumping coal. In Michigan, DTE Energy wants to shut down three coal-burning power plants and replace them with a billion dollar natural gas plant. But environmentalists think there's a better way.

One year in, the Trump administration plans to continue dismantling environmental regulations

The Trump administration has been in office for a little more than a year, and it's done a lot to change the federal government's stance on environmental issues — from announcing the U.S.'s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, to opening up thousands of miles of U.S. coastline to offshore drilling.

One year in, the Trump administration plans to continue dismantling environmental regulations

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