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News from WNYC New York Public Radio

News from WNYC New York Public Radio

From NJPR

Listen to short and long New York City stories from WNYC, New York Public Radio.

Most Recent Episodes

Eater New York hits Jersey City

Our friends at Eater New York are diving into New Jersey this month. They published a list of 22 restaurants that highlight Jersey City's dining diversity. Eater New York's Robert Sietsema walks Weekend Edition host David Furst through some of the options.

WNYC takes the kids to work - and gets them to help plan our weekends

Thursday, April 25 was take your children to work day, and we took full advantage of the extra help at WNYC. We asked our workers-for-the-day to help us come up with a list of cool things to do in New York City and the region. Weekend Edition host David Furst brings us their list.

WNYC takes the kids to work - and gets them to help plan our weekends

In Democratic primary, incumbent NJ Rep. Menendez challenged by family name

An unusually competitive Democratic primary race for Congress is taking place in Hudson County, New Jersey — as incumbent Rep. Rob Menendez, who easily won his seat two years ago, tries to distinguish himself from his embattled father, Sen. Bob Menendez. Hoboken Mayor Rhavi Bhalla is challenging the younger Menendez in the primary.

In Democratic primary, incumbent NJ Rep. Menendez challenged by family name

New York state budget includes boost for bus service, penalties for toll scofflaws

This week's On The Way roundup of New York City transit news includes new funding to expand bus service, as well as new rules to crackdown on drivers who evade tolls.

New York state budget includes boost for bus service, penalties for toll scofflaws

There's a dearth of trauma centers near Far Rockaway

There's a dire shortage of medical trauma centers in Queens. With a population of more than 2 million people, the borough has three centers serving adults. But Manhattan, with a population of just more than 1.5 million, has 4 centers. And in Far Rockaway, the southern most part of Queens, the closest facility is almost 10 miles away! All that is according to NYC Health and Hospitals. Council Member Selvena Brooks-Powers of District 31, which includes parts of Southeast Queens and all of Far Rockaway, is leading the the Far Rockaway Trauma Healthcare Access Task Force with Health and Hospitals President and CEO, Dr. Mitchell Katz. They both joined WNYC's Morning Edition host Michael Hill.

There's a dearth of trauma centers near Far Rockaway

We set out to define New York City sidewalk etiquette and received more than 400 answers

New Yorkers don't have "opinions" about sidewalk etiquette. They have opinions about scooped bagels, or "in line" vs. "on line," or the 421a tax break. When you ask New Yorkers about sidewalk behavior, they give you holy commandments. E-bikes on sidewalks? Hell no. Strollers? Banished to Westchester. Dogs? Also to Westchester. A family of tourists walking side by side, taking in the sights and enjoying themselves? Jail. It shouldn't be this contentious — New York City has about 12,000 miles of sidewalks and ample public transit options, making it, in theory, North America's pedestrian wonderland. There must be a way to make everyone happy. So we asked our Instagram followers and newsletter subscribers: What's the one sidewalk etiquette rule that's essential for New Yorkers to follow? Read the results on Gothamist.com.

We set out to define New York City sidewalk etiquette and received more than 400 answers

A hotel row in Queens is getting a new look. New affordable housing is part of the mix.

On a recent afternoon, sneakered tourists streamed out of the various hotels located along a quiet stretch of Jamaica, Queens. The Radisson, a Hampton Inn, a Residence Inn by Marriott, and erstwhile JFK Hilton, just a stone's throw from JFK Airport, represent the future of affordable housing in the city, as well as what is perhaps a missed opportunity. Months of interior demolition work is concluding at the 350-room Hilton property on 135th Avenue, just east of the Van Wyck Expressway. A massive renovation will soon follow. The structure is set to reopen in October 2025 — not as a hotel, but as a 318-unit housing complex for low-income and formerly homeless New Yorkers.

A hotel row in Queens is getting a new look. New affordable housing is part of the mix.

How 3 organizations are rewriting the narrative around waste in NYC

Every day in New York City and the region, a whole lot of stuff finds its way into landfills, from leftovers of yesterday's meals to scraps of fabric in fashion designer studios, even vibrant flowers that remain unsold at the corner store. But various organizations are working to re-shape the city's relationship with waste. This Earth Day, WNYC's Community Partnerships Desk is introducing us to a few of them. The transcript of this segment has been lightly edited for clarity My name is Dior St. Hillaire, and I am one of the co-directors at BK Rot. BK Rot is a local micro hauling and composting business. It's a nonprofit. And what we do is we collect food scraps locally, fossil fuel-free. So, we use bikes in order to do it. And we process everything locally by hand at our sites and our different partner gardens that we have. I always say that waste is like the thief in the night. Like you go to sleep, and you wake up. I mean, if sanitation picks it up, you go to sleep and then like, poof, it's gone. But nobody's thinking about the labor that goes into collecting that waste, where that waste is ending up, what other communities have to bear the brunt of that waste. And so, the work that we do specifically around environmental justice is to say that where the organic waste is generated, it should be processed and also used locally. I use hip-hop in order to teach compost. So, there's a line that I have that says compost means community so, move as one unit. We all have a part to play; interdependence is the movement. And we move it cause we don't want no stinky smell. My name is Lauren Sweeney, co-founder and CEO at Deliver Zero. Most of us are used to walking into a coffee shop, getting a single-use coffee cup or ordering DoorDash and getting a single-use container, that's used once and then it's thrown away. And of course there's no such thing as away, it has to go somewhere, which in New York State, it's likely a landfill or an incinerator, even if the stuff is marketed as recyclable. Deliver Zero is a network of reusable takeout packaging that's easy to receive on delivery orders through platforms like DoorDash and Uber Eats, and it's also easy to return the packaging at any restaurant that participates in our network or by scheduling pickups at your door. I was inspired to start this company by a problem I found in my own life, which was that I relied on single-use packaging as a busy working mom who worked long hours in startups. I'd order sushi to my office, or I'd order salad and started to feel really bad about all of the single-use packaging I was accumulating and thought there's a much bigger problem here to solve than just my frustration at not having a compost bin to put this compostable salad bowl in in my office. My name is Caroline Gates Anderson and I'm the founder of BloomAgainBklyn. BloomAgainBklyn is an organization that takes the flowers that would ordinarily be trashed and go into the solid waste stream from retailers, event planners, florists, and others, and repurposes them into beautiful arrangements for the wellness of people in the community who would ordinarily not receive flowers, such as trauma survivors, people in hospitals, children at risk. We've diverted about 1.9 million flowers from the solid waste stream. That's about a quarter of a million gallons of floral waste. Many of the flowers that come through and get delivered to America never get used at all. They would go straight to the floral waste stream. We also compost. Petals and stems that are not usable go into the composting bins. We work with organizations that work with tie-dye, so there's all sorts of utilization for flowers and not putting them back into the solid waste stream.

A Queens bookshop reflects the diversity of Jackson Heights through literature

Have you ever been to a space that instantly puts you at ease, away from the daily grind of life? Maybe that's a pocket park or quaint coffee shop in your neighborhood. WNYC's Community Partnerships Desk is highlighting some of these treasures across the five boroughs. In this segment, we visit a Queen's bookshop that exclusively sells BIPOC literature to reflect the community around it. The transcript of this segment has been lightly edited for clarity Adrian Cepeda: I am Ecuadorian-American, and I own The World's Borough Bookshop right here in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York, where I grew up. A few things played a role into me wanting to open up the bookshop. One of those being that I went to school for literature. And that was the first time I ever read a book where the character reflected me. That's one of the main reasons why I decided to open a shop. So I can have different BIPOC authors in here amplified to reflect the neighborhood I live in because on top of Queens being the most diverse borough, Jackson Heights itself is extremely diverse. A lot of times, people are just learning about their culture through these books because they've never seen a Bengali writer, a Tibetan writer, and they are finally able to see that reflected in front of them all over the store. Hillary Tacuri: With me being Ecuadorian myself, it's really great to see someone also Ecuadorian fostering this bookish space here, going in and seeing all these books by BIPOC authors just out on the shelves, and just finally being able to see myself reflected with intention and care. It was such a different experience compared to the other bookstores that I've been to. Milenka Bermanova: The World's Borough Bookshop is really important to me. I kind of view it as a second home. Finding this store was a big turning point in getting me a little bit out of an era of isolation in my life. I'll come here after work and just talk to Adrian or whoever's here, and it just lifts my mood to have conversations with people. So it's definitely a pick-me-up place and a home base at the same time.

A Queens bookshop reflects the diversity of Jackson Heights through literature

How the Israel-Hamas war came home for Jamaal Bowman

Rep. Bowman has doubled down on his calls for an immediate, permanent cease-fire and has called the Israeli air and ground offensive on Gaza a "genocide."