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News from WNYC New York Public Radio

News from WNYC New York Public Radio

From WNJP Radio - FM

Listen to short and long New York City stories from WNYC, New York Public Radio.

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Voter Registration Deadline For June Primary Looms

Even as leaders scramble to respond to the Covid 19, this crucial election year marches forward with an important deadline for New York voters on Friday. That's the deadline to register to vote in the June 23rd primary election.

Federal Judge Says East Ramapo Must Change How It Elects Its School Board

The East Ramapo School Board in Rockland County has been at the center of a political controversy for more than a decade, but that may soon change. Since 2005, elected board has been dominated by Orthodox Jewish members whose children attend private yeshivas. Meanwhile, it has steadily cut funding to local public schools, which are mostly composed of black and Latino students, while increasing funding to private schools. But a new ruling by a federal judge could dramatically change the board by altering how it is elected. Currently, the East Ramapo school board is elected using an at-large method, meaning anyone in the district could vote for all the members. But Tuesday morning, U.S. District Court Judge Cathy Seibel ordered the district to change to a ward system, which would restrict residents to voting only for board members representing their districts. Journal News investigative reporter Thomas Zambito has been covering the case. He told WNYC's Jami Floyd that the ruling is the end result of years of tension in the community. "Graduation rates have plummeted, school district budgets had more and more money has gone to transporting private school students to yeshivas while teachers were laid off, music programs were cut, honors courses were cut," Zambito said. "So there was a lot of pent-up frustration that was brought into this case." For the full conversation, click "Listen."

Federal Judge Says East Ramapo Must Change How It Elects Its School Board

Trump's New Deputy Campaign Manager Was Fired By Chris Christie Over Bridgegate

A central figure in the Bridgegate corruption case has landed a new job: Deputy campaign manager for President Trump's reelection campaign. Bill Stepien rose to prominence running former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's campaigns. He also worked as a top taxpayer-funded staffer in the governor's office, where he masterminded a strategy of gifts for politicians who supported Christie, and punishment for those who didn't. Stepien email (Trial exhibit) He once wrote: "It's good to be an incumbent with stuff to offer, ain't it? When told of the lane-closure political retaliation scheme known as Bridgegate, he allegedly asked the conspirator: "What's your cover?" He was fired by Christie after Bridgegate but never charged. At his former colleagues' Bridgegate trial, his name came up 351 times. The case against the two convicted co-conspirators in the Bridgegate trial was recently overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Trump's New Deputy Campaign Manager Was Fired By Chris Christie Over Bridgegate

What to Expect at New York and New Jersey Beaches for Memorial Weekend

A few days at the beach is typically a no-brainer for Memorial Day weekend, but with some beaches open or restricted to the public because of COVID-19, it is a little more complicated this year. Host David Furst spoke with WNYC's Karen Yi and Gothamist reporter Jake Offenhartz about where New Yorkers and New Jerseyans can go to welcome the summer while maintaining social distancing. Read more on Gothamist.com.

What to Expect at New York and New Jersey Beaches for Memorial Weekend

How An Anti-Tech LGBTQ Bar Became a Small Global Phenomenon

A popular bar in the West Village known for being a safe haven for the queer community has acquiesced to the one thing they don't allow..filming

'Chalk Crew' Checks In On Staten Island Students

In this time of remote learning, some teachers are going the extra mile to reach students. Literally.

Analysis: Large Numbers of Social Distancing Complaints Came From Mostly White Neighborhoods

An analysis by the Legal Aid Society shows that while black and Latino New Yorkers received the vast majority of summonses related to social distancing, most 311 complaints about social distancing came from neighborhoods that were not majority black and Latino. WNYC's Yasmeen Khan reports.

Analysis: Large Numbers of Social Distancing Complaints Came From Mostly White Neighborhoods

Numbers Game In Part To Blame For Starrett City's Dramatic COVID-19 Death Rate

Starrett City made headlines earlier this week when the New York City Health Department released data that showed the death rate for every zip code. Residents of the small Brooklyn neighborhood were dying at a far higher rate than anywhere else in the city. The city said the neighborhood suffered 76 deaths out of a population of 13,000, meaning the death rate was 612 deaths per 100,000 residents. The next closest rate was 446 per 100,000, in Far Rockaway. The neighborhood is dominated by Spring Creek Towers, a 153-acre complex with 46 towering apartment buildings filled with middle- and low-income tenants. Most people still call it by its original name, Starrett City. Management says more than 18,000 residents live in their complex alone, and that's only about 80 percent of the zip code. That means the death rate is not an outlier, but more in line with other hard-hit neighborhoods around the city, according to Andrew MacArthur, president of the Brooksville Company, which owns the Spring Creek. Read the full story on Gothamist.com.

Numbers Game In Part To Blame For Starrett City's Dramatic COVID-19 Death Rate

Connecticut Reopens Some Businesses

Connecticut began reopening restaurants for outdoor dining for the first time in two months as Governor Ned Lamont relaxed his stay-at-home order. It could create a blueprint could how New York and New Jersey will reopen. WNYC's Sean Carlson spoke with Hartford Courant reporter Eliza Fawcett.

One NYC Student's Remote Learning Saga

New York City's million-plus public school students are starting month three of remote learning. Mayor de Blasio just announced that summer school will also be online. And there's a strong possibility that virtual learning will continue into the fall. With no clear end in sight, WNYC's Jessica Gould has been talking to students about the experience. Here's Titilayo Aluko's story.

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