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News from WNYC New York Public Radio

News from WNYC New York Public Radio

From WNJP Radio - FM

Listen to short and long New York City stories from WNYC, New York Public Radio.

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This Week in Politics: Fiance of Stringer Accuser Says She Spoke of Assault 7 Years Ago

Leaders of the Progressive wing of the Democratic party have pulled their support for Scott Stringer, the New York City comptroller who's running for mayor. That's after a woman accused him of sexual harassment and abuse when she was a volunteer on a campaign of his, 20 years ago. Stringer has denied all allegations. Campaign-watchers are still sorting out what this means for the mayor's race, but all of this is intensely personal for the woman who went public with her accusations, Jean Kim. Elizabeth Kim had an in-depth interview with Jean Kim (no relation) this week. And speaking with WNYC's David Furst, she says Jean Kim detailed some new information during their conversation. According to Jean Kim, she spoke about the alleged incident in 2014 with her now fiance, Tony Caifano.

This Week in Politics: Fiance of Stringer Accuser Says She Spoke of Assault 7 Years Ago

New York's 2021 Michelin Restaurant Guide Is Out After Critics Took A Pause During The Pandemic

After a year like 2020 what qualified as a successful restaurant for many New Yorkers is one that could just stay open. But after anonymous inspectors took a pause for the pandemic, the Michelin restaurant guides is back with the old-fashioned barometer of 'making-it' in the competitive dining scene.

New York's 2021 Michelin Restaurant Guide Is Out After Critics Took A Pause During The Pandemic

City Agrees to Add Volunteer Officers to Subway After MTA Pleads for Help

The NYPD has agreed to send auxiliary police officers to patrol the subways. This comes after heated arguments between the MTA and the city over crime underground. The MTA has been sounding the alarm for months about the need for more police in the subways. They say assaults on workers and customers are higher than last year. Just this week an off duty transit worker was slashed with a box cutter and is in critical condition. Another was knocked unconscious. The mayor has accused the MTA of fear mongering, saying the subways have never been safer. Major crimes are down, but that's largely because there are fewer thefts. Nonetheless, the NYPD agreed to send volunteer officers to patrol the 20 busiest stations. The MTA says that's a good step, but it still wants more armed police and mental health resources for the subways.

City Agrees to Add Volunteer Officers to Subway After MTA Pleads for Help

Most People Who Are Processed in the Courts are Black and Latino, but Few Will Face a Judg...

A new statewide report on judicial demographics reveals stark disparities between the demographic composition of the bench and the rest of New York State.In 2019, only 15% of the population in New York State was Black, yet Black people accounted for 38% of all adult arrests, and nearly half of all people being sent to prison, according to the most recent data. Despite this, those who are doing the sentencing are mostly white.

Most People Who Are Processed in the Courts are Black and Latino, but Few Will Face a Judg...

Longtime NYC Marijuana Broker Looks At The Future Of The Newly Legalized Industry

People who have sold and supplied marijuana in New York's underground market are deciding how to adjust their business models in light of recreational cannabis's legalization in the state. WNYC host Sean Carlson spoke with self-proclaimed weed broker "JP" about the future of his industry.

Longtime NYC Marijuana Broker Looks At The Future Of The Newly Legalized Industry

Transit Workers Have Lowest Vaccination Rates at MTA

Transit workers were among the first group of essential workers eligible for the COVID vaccine in January. But subway and bus workers, which saw the most COVID fatalities, have also had the lowest vaccination rate at the MTA. The MTA reports just 37 percent of subway and bus workers have received one shot of the vaccine. By comparison, the rate for New York City is 45 percent. For more, go to Gothamist.com.

Want To Help India? Donating To Small Organizations May Be Your Best Bet

For weeks, Lavanya DJ watched as COVID-19 cases surged in India and began overwhelming the health care system. As calls for foreign aid and donations to non-profits and non-governmental organizations increased alongside the infection rate, she began compiling a list of smaller groups on the ground seeking help.One reason DJ chose to highlight small organizations and mutual aid groups is that many are already working with marginalized people who lack access to basic medical care or even food. By donating directly to people already in the country and working with vulnerable communities, you can bypass roadblocks that larger international organizations may be facing.Click "Listen" in the play to hear more, and to find a list of on-the-ground efforts, head to Gothamist.

Want To Help India? Donating To Small Organizations May Be Your Best Bet

Report Says M/WBEs Are Struggling To Stay Afloat

A report from the City Comptroller's office says minority and women-owned businesses in the five boroughs are struggling to stay afloat amid the pandemic.

NJ's Primary Care Doctors Say They're Key To Ramping Up Vaccinations But State Slow To Dis...

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced a plan this week to give vaccines to medical offices near the state's six vaccination megasites. But which doctors will be included and the amount of doses they'll receive is unclear. The shift comes as demand for the shot is slowing. But primary care doctors said they've largely been left out of the equation as the state focused on churning out as many doses as possible at mass vaccination sites. "Getting the shots in the right arms versus just shots and arms needed to be a priority," said Claudine Leone, government affairs counsel for the New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians. She said it's wrong to assume everyone who wants the shot will go anywhere to get it. Research shows that primary care doctors can be an important resource for patients who are undecided about receiving the vaccine. Leone says that means they can play a role in reaching out to unvaccinated people, including communities of color and those most at risk of getting sick and dying. "They have to start wondering who are the folks that aren't coming in and making the appointments? How do we find them?" she said. "I think it's identifying at least those who have a primary care physician, and letting their physician find them." A Department of Health spokeswoman said primary care doctors have been part of the vaccine rollout, including 23 federally-funded clinics that serve underinsured and uninsured populations. Spokeswoman Dawn Thomas said a handful of large private practices have also received vaccines. "As supply has increased, we have begun discussions with more primary care providers about what vaccines they can accommodate. The department recognizes they will be vital increasing access to vaccine," Thomas wrote in an email. Roughly 1,900 providers have registered with the state to begin inoculations and about 650 have received doses.

NJ's Primary Care Doctors Say They're Key To Ramping Up Vaccinations But State Slow To Dis...

Court Reform Group Files 21 Complaints Against Current and Former Queens Prosecutors

The mass filing is part of a new strategy seeking greater accountability for prosecutors who break the rules.

Court Reform Group Files 21 Complaints Against Current and Former Queens Prosecutors

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