Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood helps listeners understand the business behind the technology that's rewiring our lives. From how tech is changing the nature of work to the unknowns of venture capital to the economics of outer space, this weekday show breaks ideas, telling the stories of modern life through our digital economy. Marketplace Tech is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Weekend. Listen every weekday on-air or online anytime at marketplace.org. From American Public Media. Twitter: @MarketplaceTech
Marketplace Tech with Ben Brock Johnson

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

From American Public Media

Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood helps listeners understand the business behind the technology that's rewiring our lives. From how tech is changing the nature of work to the unknowns of venture capital to the economics of outer space, this weekday show breaks ideas, telling the stories of modern life through our digital economy. Marketplace Tech is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Weekend. Listen every weekday on-air or online anytime at marketplace.org. From American Public Media. Twitter: @MarketplaceTech

Most Recent Episodes

What if social media treated extremist content like junk mail?

What can the biggest social media platforms in the world do to radicalization online? Host Molly Wood talked with Dipayan Ghosh, who used to work on global privacy and public policy issues at Facebook. Now he's a researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School. He says, yes, it's hard for big platforms to minimize that content. But he says it's also not that hard. Today's show is sponsored by Evident, EquityZen and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

How internet 'echo chambers' lead to faster radicalization

Host Molly Wood talks with Fathali Moghaddam, a professor of psychology at Georgetown University, about how a troll becomes a terrorist. He says radicalization isn't new, but the internet can make it faster and easier. Today's show is sponsored by Pitney Bowes and EquityZen.

More extremists are getting radicalized online. Whose responsibility is that?

The man accused of killing at least 50 Muslim worshippers in Christchurch, New Zealand, last week seems to be, in many ways, the ultimate example of online radicalization. Researchers and social media experts have warned for years that there is a playbook for turning trolls into terrorists. Host Molly Wood talked with Becca Lewis, a research affiliate at the nonprofit institute Data & Society, who studies extremism online. Today's show is sponsored by WellFrame and Brother Printers.

More extremists are getting radicalized online. Whose responsibility is that?

If Tesla makes a less fancy SUV... can it make it faster?

Elon Musk has unveiled Tesla's newest vehicle, the Model Y, essentially an SUV version of the Model 3. Marketplace's Jed Kim talks with Jack Stewart, Marketplace's transportation reporter, who was at the unveiling. Stewart says the Y is really similar to the 3. Today's show is sponsored by Lenovo for Small Business, Kronos and EquityZen.

After deadly crashes, added scrutiny for Boeing 737 software

The fatal crashes of two Boeing 737 Max 8s within the past six months have prompted a global grounding of the aircraft and questions about design. Demand for Boeing aircraft has put pressure on the Seattle-based aviation giant to churn out about 50 planes a month. How does the demand to deliver so many planes impact the design process and flight software development? Marketplace's Jed Kim talked with Alwyn Scott, manufacturing and technology correspondent at Reuters. He's been covering aviation for years and says making new planes entails a lot of oversight. Today's show is sponsored by Pitney Bowes and Panopto.

Friend or Foe? Facebook and the rise and fall of Oculus

Back in 2014, the virtual reality company Oculus was poised to revolutionize VR for gaming. The Oculus Rift headset was for gamers, by gamers. End of story. But then Facebook bought the company for about $2 billion. Facebook had a much bigger vision for virtual reality as the future of engagement: people hanging out in VR like they did on the news feed, having a good time and watching ads for hours. In 2019, that vision is still just a vision. In fact, the Oculus true believers never forgave the company. Host Molly Wood talks with Blake Harris, author of "The History of the Future: Oculus, Facebook, and the Revolution That Swept Virtual Reality." Today's show is sponsored by WellFrame, Oregon State University and EquityZen.

Oculus was supposed to bring virtual reality to the masses. What happened?

Virtual reality is the technology that keeps on promising. Over the last decade, the promise kept seeming so much closer. Facebook even dropped $2 billion on the VR technology company Oculus in 2014. Blake Harris is the author of "The History of the Future: Oculus, Facebook, and the Revolution That Swept Virtual Reality." Host Molly Wood talked with Harris about how Oculus and most virtual reality tech has kind of stalled. Today's show is sponsored by Pitney Bowes and EquityZen.

Oculus was supposed to bring virtual reality to the masses. What happened?

A Baltimore teen learns 3D printing through after-school technology workshops

Training for tech jobs isn't happening across all demographics. Today, women and people of color are entering tech fields at lower rates than in the 1990s. But N'Dera Muhammad, a 16-year-old in Baltimore, was determined to learn some 3D printing skills. After trying to teach herself to code, she found hands-on help at the Digital Harbor Foundation. Today's show is sponsored by Lenovo for Small Business, Ultimate Software and Brother Printers.

A Baltimore teen learns 3D printing through after-school technology workshops

The World Wide Web turns 30. How do we keep the magic alive?

Thirty years ago this month, computer scientist and engineer Tim Berners-Lee wrote a proposal for how to link lots of information across lots of computers. That proposal for a global network of information that made the world a better place eventually became the World Wide Web. But these days, the vision is looking a little ragged. Some believe the web is even on the verge of splintering into multiple internets, depending on where or how you get online. Host Molly Wood talked with Zeynep Tufekci, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina who studies emerging technology and society. Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, Oregon State University and Panopto.

There's net neutrality legislation in Congress... but don't get too excited

On Wednesday, Democrats in Congress introduced a bill that would bring back the 2015 net neutrality rules that the Federal Communications Commission threw out in 2017. The rules prevented internet service providers from discriminating against certain types of online content. Lots of people think that legislation is the only way to settle the question of net neutrality long-term. That's because, right now, the FCC is in charge of either regulating internet service or deciding not to regulate it, and whether the FCC wants to regulate the internet depends almost entirely on which political party is in charge. But this new legislation doesn't really fix any of that. Host Molly Wood talked with Tom Merritt, host of the Daily Tech News Show podcast. He says this comes down to how internet service is legally defined. Today's show is sponsored by Evident and the University of San Francisco.

There's net neutrality legislation in Congress... but don't get too excited

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