TPR: Texas Matters "Texas Matters" is a weekly half-hour program looking at the issues, newsmakers and culture of Texas. Host David Martin Davies talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues too often overlooked by other media.
TPR: Texas Matters

TPR: Texas Matters

From Texas Public Radio

"Texas Matters" is a weekly half-hour program looking at the issues, newsmakers and culture of Texas. Host David Martin Davies talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues too often overlooked by other media.More from TPR: Texas Matters »

Most Recent Episodes

Texas Matters: Criminalizing Homelessness; Post Harvey Cry For Help; & A Digital Dragnet

This week on Texas Matters: How a city's effort to criminalize homelessness can perpetuate the problem for people living on the streets (0:30). The mayor of Port Aransas testifies about how Hurricane Harvey left his city is in ruins and how they need help (6:48). The Texas National Guard is scooping up cell phone calls and data without warrants or oversight (14:55). Guest commentator Yvette Benavides talks about the problem of sexual harassment in plain sight (23:04).

Texas Matters: Criminalizing Homelessness; Post Harvey Cry For Help; & A Digital Dragnet

Texas Matters: A Right To An Education

The San Antonio v. Rodriguez case challenged the use of local property taxes to fund school districts. But a 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1973 to uphold the funding structure has led to what many have called "discriminatory" and "fundamentally unfair." On this "Texas Matters," we look at how this decision might have created a system of separate and unequal schools that, some argue, while not directly based on race, creates disparities along racial lines.

How Prop 2 Will Make Home Equity Borrowing More Expensive

Texas voters are being asked to go to the polls and decide on seven constitutional amendments. These propositions vary from offering a p roperty tax exemption (Prop 1) for partially-disabled veterans who received a donated home to allowing banks and credit unions (Prop 7) conduct host savings promotion raffles to promote savings by offering prizes. "Texas Matters" is zeroing in on Prop 2, which — in a nutshell — changes Texas home equity lending provisions.

Examining How A Russian 'Troll Factory' Pushed Texas Secession

The fantasy of Texas national independence has been stoked for decades but in recent years it has found an ally with Russia. An investigation into a popular pro-Texas secession Facebook page found that it was run by Russians. "The Heart of Texas" Facebook page was operated by an online "troll factory" called the Internet Research Agency based in St Petersburg, Russia. The operation produced thousands of memes with the intent to juice right wing paranoia. The posts were populated with fake news

Police, Death And 'Excited Delirium'

On April 19, 2015, San Antonio police officers were called to the home of Noble and Jennifer Cooper to help deal with their adult son Norman. Norman was having some type of psychotic episode. He was highly excited, pacing back and forth without a shirt, shouting about Jesus and the gospel. Eleven minutes after police arrived Norman Cooper was hit with the first of nine stun gun charges. Cooper's heart then stopped and emergency medical techs were unable to restart it. In the course of an hour,

Johnny Cash And The Story Behind Folsom Prison Blues

Folsom Prison Blues is a country/rockabilly song that expresses the laments of a fictional inmate at Folsom Prison who wishes he could ride a nearby train away from his confinement and to San Antonio. Johnny Cash wrote the song in 1953 while stationed in Germany serving in the Air Force. Cash was inspired to pen the song after seeing the Hollywood drama film "Inside the Walls of Folsom Prison." In 1954 Cash recorded the song at Sun Records, the Memphis legendary music studio owned and operated

Texas Matters: Post Hurricane Harvey And A Future Of Super Storms

Governor Greg Abbott estimates that the damage from Hurricane Harvey will total between $150 billion to $180 billion. Harvey will be more costly than epic Hurricanes Katrina or Sandy, which devastated New Orleans in 2005 and New York City in 2012. As global temperatures continue to rise, climate scientists have said this is what we should expect—more huge storms, with drastic impacts. Though scientists are still wrestling with some of the specifics of how climate change is impacting hurricanes,

Texas Matters: What Graham-Cassidy Could Mean For Texas

The clock is ticking for Republican leaders in Washington D.C. to pass their latest ObamaCare repeal bill. There is a September 30th deadline to have a new law in place before the budget reconciliation. And the U.S. Senate is set for a possible vote next week on a bill sponsored by Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana. If passed and signed into law by President Trump the Graham Cassidy bill would create winners and losers among the 50 states. Each state

Texas Matters: Nuclear Anxiety In The Time of Trump

Texas is the home of the Pantex Facility in Amarillo, an important part of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex. The Pantex Plant is the primary United States nuclear weapons assembly and disassembly facility that aims to maintain the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Things are getting very busy again at Pantex. The Pantex Plant is one of three nuclear weapons sites in the United States being considered to produce plutonium "pits," the

Texas Matters: When Confederate Statues Come Down

Confederate monuments are continuing to be dismantled in Texas. Last week San Antonio removed a statue dedicated to fallen Confederate soldiers. Undercover of the night the commemorative cairn was evicted from Travis Park in downtown San Antonio. Also this week, the Dallas City Council voted to relocate a statue of confederate General Robert E. Lee. And in August, the University of Texas suddenly took down four statues from a prominent grassy area of campus. The figures of General Robert E. Lee,

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