Scott Thybony Commentaries Thoughts and reflections of life around the Grand Canyon from local author and commentator Scott Thybony.

Scott Thybony Commentaries

From KNAU Classical - Arizona Public Radio

Thoughts and reflections of life around the Grand Canyon from local author and commentator Scott Thybony.

Most Recent Episodes

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Montezuma's Treasure

Commentator Scott Thybony isn't normally interested in legengs about buried treausre in the Southwestern desert. But eve he is susceptible to a good story. In his latest Canyon Commentary, Scott shares the wild tale of a search for Aztec gold along the Arizona Strip in the 1920's. It was such a frezy, the entire town of Kanab, Utah shut down for two years during the quest to find Montezuma's treasure.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Book of Love

The West is a rugged place filled with outlaws, tall tales and rocky terrain. The same description could also apply to Western love stories. Writer Scott Thybony has been musing lately about tough love stories on the Colorado Plateau. He shares a few with us in his latest Canyon Commentary.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Smokejumper

Smokejumpers have one of the most extreme jobs in wildland firefighting, parachuting into fires in remote areas. It takes a special kind of person to hurl themself out of a plane and into the path of a forest fire; a person like Bobby Montoya. The longtime smokejumper - now retired - told KNAU's Scott Thybony, missing the job feels like a he's lost part of his body. Montoya is the focus of this month's Canyon Commentary.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Ahab's Tree

Arizona storms produce some pretty spectacular lightning shows. They're fun to watch if you're at a safe distance, but if you're out in th elements, dodging bolts can be downright terrifying...and life-threatening. Writer Scott Thybony knows that. In his latest Canyon Commentary, he introduces us to Ahab's Tree, a lightning-scarred Ponderosa on the San Francisco Peaks.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Home Of The Burrito

Burritos might not be the first food that come to mind on Thanksgiving Day, but they are for commentator Scott Thybony. He's a burrito guy; always has been. And on this day - that is partly a celebration of indigenous foods, like beans and flat breads - Scott tells us about his life-long bean burrito odyssey.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Last Drink

On this Halloween, commentator Scott Thybony brings us the gruesome true story of an outlaw named John Shaw. In 1905, he was gunned down by a sheriff's posse after robbing some gamblers of $300 in silver coins. Shaw was buried in a cemetery east of Flagstaf, near the Canyon Diablo Trading Post. But, his friends thought he deserved a more ceremonious burial. We'll let Scott tell you the rest in his latest Canyon Commentary.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Rite of Passage

A journey through the Grand Canyon by river has changed many a life, maybe because of the wider perspective it offers. Professors have dropped out to become boatmen, boatmen have gone on to become professors. And once, a trip down the Colorado River became a rite of passage for a young river runner...and his father. Scott Thybony has more in this month's Canyon Commentary.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Naming Ceremony

Commentator Scott Thybony had the honor recently of attending a Hopi baby naming ceremony. His good friend, tribal judge Delfred Leslie, had a new granddaughter and wanted Scott to come out to First Mesa for the dawn ceremony. He told Scott to be prepared to offer a name for the baby, as tradition expects of all guests. In this month's Canyon Commentary, Scott talks about ancestors, the mixing of traditions, and the cultural mosaic of the Colorado Plateau.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Cave Rescue

The dramatic rescue of a youth soccer team in Thailand conjured up some memories for KNAU commentator Scott Thybony. In 1965, when he was just 16 years old, Scott took part in the rescue of four men trapped inside a cave in Arkansas. The two events—decades and thousands of miles apart—share some eerie similarities.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Last Lookout

There is a long-standing tradition in Arizona of literary pilgrimages. People journey to Walnut Canyon where Willa Cather gathered inspiration for her 1915 novel 'Song of the Lark'. Others belly up to the bar at The Weatherford Hotel in Flagstaff where Zane Grey wrote 'The Call of the Canyon' in an upstairs room in 1923. And some venture to the North Rim Lookout Tower where Edward Abbey worked as a fire scout in the early 1970's, filling up journal after journal with observations and musings.

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