The World: Latest Edition Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is.
The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

From PRX

Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is.

Most Recent Episodes

US colleges to lose foreign students after ICE announcement

US colleges are bracing to lose many foreign students this fall after US Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued new guidelines that require international students in online-only courses to transfer schools or leave the country altogether. And the UN's cultural agency UNESCO has warned that its name and logo are being illegally emblazoned on false documents to facilitate a scam selling supposedly valuable statues in Mali and Cameroon. Also, UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced Wednesday a plan called "Eat Out to Help Out." During the month of August, people who dine-in at restaurants in the UK will receive 50% off their meal, excluding alcohol, with about a $13 limit per person.

Brazil's president tests positive for coronavirus

After months of flouting the threat of the pandemic, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro announced on live television that he has tested positive for the coronavirus. Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is planning his first international diplomatic mission to Washington to celebrate the new US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement. But his visit is generating tough questions back home. Plus, to celebrate his 85th birthday, the Dalai Lama has released an 11-track album called "Inner World" featuring mantras and teachings all set to a relaxing bed of music.

Coronavirus Conversations: How the pandemic is exacerbating food insecurity and global inequities

The coronavirus crisis has exacerbated existing crises of food insecurity and health disparities. And mass protests around the world continue to spotlight deep-seated inequities faced by communities of color. As part of our weekly discussion series on the global pandemic and as a special podcast in The World's feed, reporter Elana Gordon moderated a conversation exploring the global food supply and inequities, presented with Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Coronavirus Conversations: How the pandemic is exacerbating food insecurity and global inequities

Facebook suspends Hong Kong user data requests

Facebook and other tech giants will temporarily stop processing requests for user data from Hong Kong authorities after China imposed a security law on the city that calls for greater supervision and regulation of Hong Kong's internet. And, many sex workers continued to work throughout the COVID-19 lockdown, putting them at risk from abusive clients as well as the coronavirus. Now, brothels across the content are reopening, and authorities have issued a long list of hygiene rules. Also, most Pride activities around the world were canceled or moved online this year, but Shanghai Pride events continued as usual. But "as usual" means something very different in China compared to other places.

Scientists study the coronavirus immunity puzzle

If one thing is clear about this teeny tiny new coronavirus, it's that it has changed the world. Scientists around the world are trying to understand how immunity to the coronavirus works — but, as The World's Elana Gordon reports, it's a maddening puzzle. English pubs are reopening this weekend. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is encouraging the British public to enjoy, but also to use good judgment. Also, how the pandemic is getting people to rethink the ways they work. One municipality in Nova Scotia experiments with a four-day work week. Plus, a new album from the Djibouti national radio band is the first global album release in the country's 43-year-history. The World's host Marco Werman speaks to one of the co-producers of the album, called "The Dancing Devils of Djibouti."

Fauci: 'We've got to do something' about the coronavirus numbers

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, sees COVID-19 as a formidable, global foe. But he tells The World's host Marco Werman he's cautiously optimistic there will be more than one safe and effective vaccine available. Also, could pulling CO2 directly out of the air be an effective way to fight climate change? Plus, in Brazil, wildfires in the Amazon are threatening a region already hit hard by the novel coronavirus. And, the next Women's World Cup will be hosted by Australia and New Zealand. The 2019 soccer FIFA World Cup was a smashing success, with well over a billion viewers. Expectations are high for 2023.

New security law in Beijing targets protesters

In Hong Kong, a restrictive new security law enacted by Beijing is being used to arrest protesters on its first day in effect. we hear from pro-democracy activist Isaac Cheng. Plus, in Russia, it's the last day for citizens to vote on a large bundle of constitutional amendments that include a measure that would allow President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036. And, we look at how the coronavirus has impacted migrants in the seafood industry in the US.

What's at stake in Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement

Chinese artist and human rights activist Ai Weiwei talks about what's at stake in Hong Kong for the pro-democracy movement. Plus, vaccine testing in South Africa, which this week became the first African country with a vaccine trial. And, a change to a refugee program in Europe could leave thousands of the most vulnerable asylum-seekers who pass through Greek refugee camps homeless.

Russian bounties on US troops in Afghanistan

In the past few days, The New York Times published bombshell revelations that Russia reportedly offered cash bounties to Taliban-linked fighters for killing US soldiers in Afghanistan. The World's host Marco Werman speaks with David Petraeus, the retired former head of US forces in Afghanistan and an ex-CIA chief, about how the US should respond if the reports are verified. And, one of the most important North Koreans alive is Kim Yo-jong, the half-sister of leader Kim Jong-un. Her influence in the regime has been hyped up by rumors — some true, some not — but it's now becoming clear that Kim Yo Jong really does have a lot of power. According to The World's Patrick Winn, whether North Korea tilts towards peace or war could hinge on her decisions. Also, the coronavirus lockdowns around the world have led animals to explore some places previously filled with people. The World speaks to Christian Rutz, an evolutionary ecologist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, about wildlife movement while humans are in quarantine.

Developing 'instant' tests for the coronavirus

A number of so-called "instant" tests for the coronavirus are being developed that could offer results within minutes. That could expand testing dramatically and help hospitals in the most vulnerable of places. And, last week's Supreme Court ruling blocking the Trump administration from immediately ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was a relief for hundreds of thousands of immigrants and their families in the US. But living with DACA status has forced some immigrants to make agonizing decisions. Also, an American mom has sparked a transatlantic battle of sorts — over tea.

Back To Top