PRI's The World Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is. PRI's The World, the radio program, is heard every weekday on over 300 public stations across North America.
PRI's The World

PRI's The World

From PRI

Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is. PRI's The World, the radio program, is heard every weekday on over 300 public stations across North America.

Most Recent Episodes

El Chapo gets life in prison

Mexican drug cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman has been sentenced to life in prison— plus 30 years. A US veteran, originally from Belize, was unable to enter the US for a citizenship interview on Monday. Brazil's president wants to put more armed police officers in the country's public schools. And, we meet a dancer who is making the male-dominated tango scene in Buenos Aires a safer space for women.

A Russian perspective on America's moon landing

When Apollo 11 lifted off 50 years ago on Tuesday, the goal was to beat the Soviets to the moon. Sergei Khrushchev, the son of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, and a former Soviet missile engineer, looks back on the era. Also, how people in Tehran perceive the increasing pressure on Iran from the White House. And, Brazil's autocratic new president tries to undo laws that favor Indigenous Brazilians.

Trump announces new asylum rule for the US

President Donald Trump rewrites United States asylum policy to shut the door on most Central American asylum-seekers. How does the new policy squares with existing international agreements? Also, the first in a series of reports from Brazil, which has a migrant crisis of its own on its border with Venezuela. And, a look at what Germany and the United Kingdom are doing with renewable energy and their aging power grids.

The British ambassador in Washington resigns

The British ambassador to the US, Kim Darroch, resigned on Wednesday amid controversy over his leaked emails that described the Trump White House as dysfunctional, clumsy and inept. Also, an update from the US-Mexico border, where frustrations are growing for migrants trying to cross into the US and criticism of conditions at migrant detention facilities continue to mount. And, we say goodbye (again) to the Volkswagen Beetle.

Trump stills wants citizenship question on the census

The Trump administration is still looking for a way to include a question about citizenship in the 2020 Census, despite a Supreme Court ruling that put the plan on hold. And, we hear from two immigrants on opposite sides of the census debate — one who thinks immigrants are unlikely to fill out the form, and another who thinks her activist group can calm the fears of those who see participating in the census as a major risk. Plus, the story of the Edinburgh Seven — seven women who enrolled to study medicine at the University of Edinburgh in 1869 and were prevented from graduating by their male peers.

Is the Iran deal dead?

Iran says it has breached a nuclear enrichment level set out in the 2015 nuclear deal. But Britain's ambassador to the United Nations, Karen Pierce, says the UK hasn't ruled out the possibility of getting Iran back into full compliance with the pact. Also, as billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein faces charges of running a sex-trafficking operation that lured dozens of underage girls, The World looks at the problem of international sex trafficking and the legal jeopardy its victims face. Plus, the chants of "Equal Pay!" rang out in the stadium in Lyon, France, on Sunday after the US team won the Women's World Cup. When it comes to soccer — and all professions — the global struggle against the gender pay equity gap is real.

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