PRI's The World: Latest Edition Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is. PRI's The World, the radio program, is heard every weekday on over 300 public stations across North America.
PRI's The World

PRI's The World: Latest Edition

From PRI

Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is. PRI's The World, the radio program, is heard every weekday on over 300 public stations across North America.

Most Recent Episodes

How aid groups are adapting to deal with increased extreme weather

The US Midwest, as well as in parts of southern Africa, have both recently seen entire communities cut off by flood waters, washed out roads, aid that has to be flown in. We'll have the latest from Mozambique and eastern Zimbabwe. Also, an American doctor says the many challenges facing Haiti as a nation are reflected in the health of his Haitian patients. And he links it to the long history of foreign intervention in Haiti. Plus, Filipinos are among the biggest users of the so-called H-2B visa, which allows American businesses to hire seasonal workers. But this summer, the Trump administration won't be issuing the visas to Filipinos.

Changing gun laws in New Zealand

The legal and political differences of gun control between the US and New Zealand. Also, one British woman's effort to retain EU access as the UK careens toward an uncertain Brexit. Plus, the Japanese baseball phenom known only by one name — Ichiro — is about to begin his last major league season at age 45.

The threat of white nationalism

The terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, was yet another example of white nationalist terrorism. It's a threat that some say the US needs to take more seriously. Plus, a mission to protest family separation at the Mexican border. And, everyone knows surf music started in the Middle East, right?

Journalists pay the price in Maduro's Venezuela

Earlier this week, Venezuelan journalist Luz Mely Reyes heard that one of her colleagues, Luis Carlos Diaz, was taken from his home and detained by Venezuela's intelligence officers. He's one of dozens of journalists detained in Venezuela since the start of 2019. Plus, the growing movement of kids cutting school to demand action against climate change. And Japan's far-right openly talk about building a nuclear bomb.

The Syria Conflict, 8 years later

President Donald Trump this afternoon ordered the grounding of Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, reversing an earlier decision by US regulators to allow the planes to keep flying. Also, eight years after the start of the conflict in Syria, the war continues to take a heavy toll on the Syrian people. Host Marco Werman speaks with a former English teacher from Aleppo who took part in some of the earliest anti-government protests in the city. Plus, The World's Carolyn Beeler checks in from Antarctica. Beeler is traveling with scientists who are studying the effects of climate change on the ice shelves in the southern continent.

Why some parents are afraid to vaccinate their kids

Tuesday was a big day for Brexit. Lawmakers once again rejected Prime Minister Theresa May's deal to quit the European Union, 17 days before the planned departure date. Also, an outbreak of measles is happening in the Philippines. We hear reasons behind public skepticism of vaccines in different parts of the globe. And, the World Wide Web turns 30!

Remembering passengers on doomed Ethiopia Airlines Flight 302

In the aftermath of the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, we look at the role Ethiopian Airlines has in the country and the region. Plus, we remember some of the passengers who died on Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Also, Tibet marks 60 years since a rebellion tried and failed to overthrow Chinese rule. And, a woman joins the ranks of Acapulco's famous cliff divers.

US Women's Soccer team sues for equal pay

The US Women's National Soccer team is suing their sport's governing body for equal pay. Also, leading clerics in Indonesia are urging Muslims around the world to refrain from using the Arabic word for "infidel" to refer to non-Muslims. And we meet Micropixie, a San Francisco-based musician whose family has been migrating between continents for three generations, leaving her with a unique perspective on borders and freedom.

The Trumpiest leader in Europe visits the White House

We're following a report that the US government has secretly tracked journalists who covered immigration, as well as immigration activists and lawyers who helped migrants hoping to enter the US. The tracked individuals had their names reportedly put in a government database, and in some cases, they were singled out for extra scrutiny when crossing the US-Mexico border. Also, it's the 30th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, when a popular nonviolent uprising ended Communist rule in what was then Czechoslovakia. Plus, a young jazz musician from Sudan who's part of the protest movement there.

The Trumpiest leader in Europe visits the White House

Audio will be available later today.
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