The Takeaway A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.
The Takeaway

The Takeaway

From PRI

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

Most Recent Episodes

Podcast: 2019-05-20 5th Death of a Migrant Child Since December Occurs as Border Apprehens...

5th Death of a Migrant Child Since December Occurs as Border Apprehensions Continue to Rise Since December, five migrant children have died after being detained by U.S. immigration agencies. The Juggle: Money In Your 40s The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. First up: money. New York City Considers Ban on Fur Speaker of the NYC Council Corey Johnson is urging his colleagues to support a proposed ban on the sale of fur in New York City, setting off the latest chapter in a long debate. 'Trial by Fire' Examines Whether Texas Executed an Innocent Man "Trial by Fire," a new movie starring Laura Dern, tells the true story of a man executed by the state of Texas for a crime that evidence suggests he did not commit. Other segments: Officer-Involved Deaths: How Much Does the Public Actually Learn? Oscar Grant, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland: new information has come to light in these cases. What have we learned?

Podcast: 2019-05-20 5th Death of a Migrant Child Since December Occurs as Border Apprehens...

Politics with Amy Walter: The Political Power of Teachers

It feels like every day someone new announces they are running for President. But Andrew Yang, the founder of the fellowship program for recent college graduates Venture for America, was one of the first to declare. If elected, he says he would implement a universal basic income, meaning that every American citizen over 18 years of age would get $1,000 a month. We speak to him about how that would actually work, and how he would pay for it. Also, the teachers' strikes across the country that began in 2018 are a sign that teachers' unions are stronger than ever. As the 2020 Democratic candidates compete for their support, they are laying out ambitious education proposals. Will this be the election that people vote on education? Or is this still largely viewed as a state issue, not a federal one? Guests: Andrew Yang, Democratic presidential candidate Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers Sarah Reckhow, Associate Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University Jeffrey Henig, Professor of Political Science at Teachers College, Columbia University Linda Tillman, Ph.D., Professor Emerita at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Podcast: 2019-05-16 School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education The number of intensely segregated minority schools has tripled since 1988 with New York and California having some of the highest rates of school segregation. 'The Unsung Heroes:' Military Kids Resilient, but Face Extra Challenges Common realities of being in a military family, like having a parent deployed or moving around a lot, can be stressors for children. Creating an Advice Show By and For People of Color KQED's podcast "Truth Be Told" is an advice show designed to give people of color a space to talk among themselves that's not framed through whiteness. Other segments: Disney Is Extending Its Reach to Infinity and Beyond Disney announced Tuesday that they will be taking Comcast's stake in Hulu, adding another property to what is quickly becoming the most powerful entertainment company in history. San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition in a Move to Democratize Surveillance Technology The federal government can still use facial recognition technology in the jurisdiction.

Podcast: 2019-05-16 School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

Podcast: 2019-05-15 Where Do U.S.-Russia Relations Stand Following Pompeo's Meeting with Putin?

Where Do U.S.-Russia Relations Stand Following Pompeo's Meeting with Putin? Secretary of State Mike Pompeo went to Russia on Tuesday to meet with Vladimir Putin. The leaders discussed several issues on which the two countries remain sharply opposed. "Freedom Never Smelled So Good": How an American Woman is Helping Honduran Women Achieve Justice Gracie Murphree has been running a refugee center in Honduras for women and children escaping violence. LGBTQ Representation is Becoming More Prominent in Children's Entertainment A recent episode of Arthur, where Arthur's teacher gets married to his partner Patrick, is emblematic of the rise of LGBTQ representation in children's entertainment. Other segments: Attack at a Church in Burkina Faso is the Latest in a Surge of Terrorism in the Country This past Sunday, a terrorist attack at a Catholic church left six dead. This is just the latest in a surge of attacks over the last few years. WhatsApp Hack Exposes Vulnerabilities of Encrypted Messaging Apps The hack affected 1.5 billion WhatsApp users.

Podcast: 2019-05-15 Where Do U.S.-Russia Relations Stand Following Pompeo's Meeting with Putin?

Podcast: 2019-05-14 Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences

Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences Patients are having to travel long distances to access the care they need. China Strikes Back: Trade War Escalation Spooks Global Markets China announced retaliatory tariffs on Monday, promising to "never surrender" in the trade war with the US. Pompeo Cancels Trip to Moscow to Meet with E.U. Diplomats About Iran On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo canceled a planned trip to Moscow and instead met With E.U. diplomats, with hopes of finding common ground over Iran. Other segments: A Rhode Island School Districts "Lunch Shaming" Policy Renews Conversation Over School Lunch Debt Students in Warwick, RI who owed money for past meals were to be served cold sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches until a national backlash caused the district to scrap its plan.

Podcast: 2019-05-14 Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences

Podcast: 2019-05-13 Laws Across the Country Seek to Limit Abortion to 6 Weeks

Laws Across the Country Seek to Limit Abortion to 6 Weeks The Alabama bill aims to criminalize abortion in almost all cases and would charge doctors with up to 99 years in prisons for providing abortions. How Torture Crushed Civilian Opposition in Syria Up to hundreds of thousands of Syrians were imprisoned and tortured — and many were killed — in President Bashar al-Assad's continued campaign to stifle opposition. Asylum Seekers May Face More Danger in Mexico as Border Patrol Begins Screenings The Remain in Mexico policy change is also placing migrants in danger. Are Video Games Encouraging Kids to Gamble? "Loot Box" Reform Would Curb In-Game Purchases Republican Senator Josh Hawley plans legislation that would prohibit game makers from selling loot boxes to minors. Other segments: Advocates, Lawmakers Push to Stop Violence Against Native Women Native women face high rates of violence and murder and go missing more often than other groups of women.

Podcast: 2019-05-13 Laws Across the Country Seek to Limit Abortion to 6 Weeks

Politics with Amy Walter: "The World's Most Exclusive Club"

In his 1957 book, Citadel, journalist William White refers to the Senate as "the world's most exclusive club." But for many high-profile Democrats, it's a club that seems to have gone out of style. In April, Stacey Abrams, the Democrat who narrowly lost the race for governor of Georgia in 2018, announced that she is not running for Senate. Joaquin Castro in Texas, Ambassador Susan Rice in Maine, Congresswoman Cindy Axne and former Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa have all made the same decision. Then, there's the Democrats who have decided to run for president instead: John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and Beto O'Rourke who rose to prominence in 2018 when he challenged Texas Senator Ted Cruz. What's going on here? Jennifer Duffy, a political analyst covering US Senate and Governor's races for the Cook Political Report, explains why for some Democrats the Senate seems to have lost its allure. Frances Lee, a political science professor at the University of Maryland, tells us how we got a Senate in the first place. Osita Nwanevu, a staff writer at the New Yorker covering politics and policy in Washington, D.C., and Logan Dobson, a Republican strategist and the former director of Data and Analytics for the National Republican Senatorial Committee, debate equal state representation in the U.S Senate. Alan Frumin, the Senate Parliamentarian from 1987 to 1995 and again from 2001 to 2012, answers questions from our listeners about Senate rules and procedures. Amy's Final Take: The debate about how the Senate works - or doesn't - is part of a bigger debate and a bigger issue that I've talked about a lot on this show; the breakdown of trust and faith in institutions. The whole deal in politics is that winners treat the losers fairly because they know that someday they will be on the losing side and want to be treated with respect and fairness. But, that's not where we are now. Americans are more distrustful of the other party than ever before. But, changing the underlying structures of the system creates all kinds of unintended consequences that may only exacerbate the problems they are trying to fix. Blowing up or reconstructing institutions like the Senate may solve a short-term problem, but in the long term our bigger problem that needs fixing is to find faith and trust in one another.

Podcast: 2019-05-09 Checking the Checks and Balances

Checking the Checks and Balances As the fight between House Democrats and the White House continues to escalate, are the checks and balances between the branches of the government working? China Attempts to Undercut Trade Deal; Trump Promises New Tariffs Negotiations appeared to have been going well, but the Chinese reportedly reneged on a series of key promises. European Far-Right Leaders May Capitalize on the Rise of Spain's "Vox" Party It's the first time a far-right party has gained seats since the fall of the dictatorship in 1975. Other segments: Ebola Response in the Democratic Republic of Congo: What Are the Challenges? More than 1,000 people have died from Ebola since last summer in the Democratic Republic of Congo. When You Play the Game of Spoilers, Do You Win or Lose? With spoiler warnings at an all-time high with the release of Avengers: Endgame and the final season of Game of Thrones, we took a look at how rational the fear of spoilers really is.

Podcast: 2019-05-08 As Uber Prepares to Go Public, Drivers Across the Country Strike

As Uber Prepares to Go Public, Drivers Across the Country Strike Drivers are demanding better pay, as the company stands to reap $10 billion after its long-awaited IPO. Treasury Secretary Refuses Congressional Request to Hand Over Trump's Tax Returns Mnuchin said the request lacked a "legitimate legislative purpose" and that he could not authorize the release as a result. 'It's So Hard:' Military Spouses on the Challenges of Having a Career When we asked Takeaway listeners in military families about the biggest challenges they face, many of you said finding employment as a spouse.

Podcast: 2019-05-08 As Uber Prepares to Go Public, Drivers Across the Country Strike

Podcast: 2019-05-07 Celebrating One Year of Tanzina Vega

One year ago today, Tanzina Vega made her debut as the host of The Takeaway. At the time, she outlined three gaps in the United States that she felt should be part of The Takeaway's core mission: the wealth gap, the truth gap and the empathy gap. To celebrate Tanzina's one-year anniversary, The Takeaway is broadcasting live from WNYC's The Greene Space and asking, when it comes to inequality, misinformation and understanding, are we further apart today than we were then? Joining Tanzina to address the empathy gap, and what it takes to more fully imagine the perspectives of others, are Jelani Cobb, a staff writer for The New Yorker who writes about race, politics, history, and culture, Ziwe Fumudoh, a comedian and writer for Showtime's "Desus and Mero," and Javier Zamora, a poet and writer born in El Salvador, and author of the collection "Unaccompanied." To delve into the racial wealth gap in the United States, Tanzina speaks with Andre Perry, a Brookings Institution fellow and author of the forthcoming book, "Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in American Cities." And rounding out the hour is Susan Chira, editor-in-chief of The Marshall Project, who joins Tanzina to discuss the truth gap in our changing media landscape.

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