Living on Earth Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood and the LOE public radio news team to keep you up to date with fair and accurate coverage.
PRI: Living on Earth

Living on Earth

From PRI

Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood and the LOE public radio news team to keep you up to date with fair and accurate coverage.More from Living on Earth »

Most Recent Episodes

Vanishing Insects, The Hidden Life of Trees, and more

Flying Insects Crash / Emerging Science Note: Brazilian Peppertree / Trees On the Move / The Early Bird Breeds Fast / Baby Tern Goes Exploring / The Hidden Life of Trees / The Place Where You Live: Bear Creek, WI and St. Paul, MN Flying insects may plague us in the summer, but they're vital food sources for birds and bats, and they pollinate most of our crops. Yet 75% of them have vanished in the last quarter-century, with potentially disastrous consequences. Also, the big old oak in your backyard may be rooted firmly in place- but its acorns can travel. Now as the planet warms and climates change, trees are on the move, and transforming the species mix in our forests. We also take a look at how trees communicate via a "wood wide web" — and a forester's conviction that they are far more sentient than we think. The hidden life of trees and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Greening the Military, India's Solar Revolution, and more

Greening the Military / Solar Eclipsing Coal in Jobs / India's Renewable Energy Revolution / Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right Renewable energy to the rescue: In the U.S. military, hybrid vehicles and innovations like 'solar blankets' can improve operations, and even save the lives of soldiers. Also, in the U.S., coal still produces far more energy than solar. But solar already employs twice as many people as the coal industry does, and some former coal miners are becoming solar technicians. And India is leading the world in slashing carbon emissions as it undertakes a renewable energy revolution. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

'Ghost' Particles, Green Campuses and more

Global Warming to Worsen Southern Poverty / BirdNote: When the Amazon Floods / Linking Fracking and Radon / 100% Sun Power for Hampshire College / Fossil Fuel Freedom Fighters / Science Note: Nanowire Battery Breakthrough / The Telescope in the Ice: The Hunt for the Ghost Particle A new generation of nature writers is coming of age in America, and grappling with the loss of the pristine landscapes their parents and grandparents enjoyed. Also, rising radon levels in Pennsylvania homes have been linked to fracking, but there's more to the story. And one of the world's most sensitive telescopes is buried deep in Antarctic ice, searching for evidence of elusive neutrinos. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Endangered Species: Humboldt Martens, Rhinos and more

A new GOP carbon tax bill promises to fight climate change with a "tax swap" that would fund infrastructure and climate adaptation strategies. Also, LED lights are energy-efficient, but they could be harming wildlife by leading sea turtles astray, and even perplexing the humble housefly. And deep in the coastal forests of California and Oregon, the tiny and voracious Humboldt marten is threatened by habitat loss, trapping, and illegal cannabis farming. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

FEMA's Failures, Saving Corals and more

FEMA admits it failed to adequately prepare for Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, a disaster that cost thousands of human lives. Maria devastated coral communities, too, so locals and combat diving veterans are coming to the rescue by putting healthy fragments back in place. And as rising temperatures threaten corals across the globe, scientists are using CRISPR to identify which genes make some coral species more heat-tolerant. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Living on Earth: July 13, 2018

Scott Pruitt is gone and his deputy and former coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler, now acting administrator at the EPA, is expected to carry on Mr. Pruitt's legacy of regulatory rollbacks. Change is also coming to the US Supreme Court , as Justice Kennedy steps down. Nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh has been tough on environmental regulations in past cases, and could shift the high Court further to the right. And at a major trauma center and teaching hospital in Boston, a rooftop garden is helping patients heal by providing them with fresh, nutritious produce. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Living on Earth: July 6, 2018

Conservatives Join Climate Agenda | Beyond The Headlines | The Tide Keeps Rising | Ozone-destroying Chemicals Make A Comeback | An American Eden: The Lost Garden Underneath Rockefeller Center | Mark Seth Lender: Tern About As America celebrated Independence Day, we looked back to the legacy of the generation that followed the "founding fathers," and the pioneering physician who founded America's first botanical garden in the heart of what's now Rockefeller Center. Also, a bipartisan carbon tax and dividend effort seeks to bring both sides of the aisle together for action on climate change, and looks past the 2018 midterm elections. And as politicians work to find common ground on climate change, there's no time to waste in preparing for its impacts, suggests a study from NOAA that forecasts more frequent tidal flooding in the years ahead. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Living on Earth: June 29, 2018

Farm Bills Tough on Conservation And Food Stamps | US Relies On Imported Organic Foods | Climate Will Drive Corn Crop Failure | Beyond The Headlines | Central America's Climate Refugees | Audio PostCard: Sounds of São Paulo, Brazil Families say they are migrating from Central America in part because they are feeling climate disruption right now with disastrous storms and searing droughts. And in this episode, we also focus on food. Congress is slashing farm conservation measures and US farmers can't seem to keep up with the growing demand for organic corn and soy. Organic or not, corn seems to be heading for trouble as the world keeps warming, with a much higher risk of crop failures in the future. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Living on Earth: June 22, 2018

Seas Rising Faster With Antarctic Melt | Boston's Rising Tide | Humpback Whales Rebound | Beyond The Headlines | The Last Lobster In this episode, we delve into Antarctica's rapid ice loss, which is three times what it was just a decade ago thanks to warmer ocean temperatures that eat away at the icy continent from below. These same warmer waters are also increasing access to food for humpback whales, and their population is booming thanks in part to conservation efforts. But the humpback whale comeback could be short-lived. And up on the coast of Maine the warming ocean is a threat for lobstermen who have enjoyed unprecedented catches in recent years. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

Living on Earth: June 15, 2018

Tough Climate at the G7 | Canada Buys Tar Sands Pipeline | EPA Dilutes Toxics Law | Beyond the Headlines | BirdNote: Exquisite Thrush Song | | Audio Postcard: A Fisherman Rigging Bait on Nantucket In this episode, we discuss President Trump's refusal to join America's closest allies in discussions to advance the Paris Climate Agreement at the G7 Summit. The Trump Administration is also narrowing regulation of toxic chemicals, even though EPA is tasked with doing so by federal law. And we talk with a writer who followed in the footsteps, and paddle strokes, of the people who journeyed to North America thousands of years ago. Their remarkable ability to adapt could hold lessons for our world today, as we face a rapidly changing climate. Those stories and more, in this installment of Living on Earth from PRI.

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