AirTalk Episode Friday April 16, 2021

Today on AirTalk, we break down the latest COVID-19 news. Also on the show, we talk with a mental health expert on how people of color can cope after traumatic events; go over the latest movie releases with our KPCC critics; and more.

Mental Health And POC The Toll Of Seeing Continuous Acts Of Violence At The Hands Of Police

Disturbing bodycam video released Thursday after public outcry over the Chicago police shooting of a 13-year-old boy shows the youth appearing to drop a handgun and begin raising his hands less than a second before an officer fires his gun and kills him. The footage of Adam Toledo's killing comes during the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, a Minneapolis police officer charged in the murder of George Floyd. This week also saw the killing of Daunte Wright, shot by another Minnesota officer during a traffic stop. Many of these deaths were caught on camera... in videos that are traumatizing to watch, particularly for people of color. We'll get the latest on the ground in Chicago, plus we'll talk to a mental health expert about how people of color can take care of themselves. With files from the Associated Press With guest host Austin Cross Guests: Chip Mitchell, one of the criminal justice reporters at WBEZ in Chicago who has been covering this story; he tweets @ChipMitchell1 Ayana Jordan M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine; she tweets @DrAyanaJordan

Mental Health And POC The Toll Of Seeing Continuous Acts Of Violence At The Hands Of Police

COVID-19 AMA Spring Wave, Variants, When The Vaccine Will Be Ready For Kids And More

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Shruti Gohil, professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine's School of Medicine. Topics today include: Spring Wave Of Coronavirus Crashes Across 38 States As Hospitalizations Increase CDC Identifies Small Group of Covid-19 Infections Among Fully Vaccinated Patients You're Vaccinated. Your Kids Aren't. Now What? Third Dangerous, More Contagious Coronavirus Variant Identified In Yolo County Pfizer CEO Says Third COVID Vaccine Dose Likely Needed Within 12 Months Stanford Begins Testing Pfizer Vaccine In Kids As Young As Two UCLA Study On How Air Quality Is Fueling Vulnerability To COVID In Some Communities With guest host Austin Cross Guest: Shruti Gohil, M.D., professor of medicine and associate medical director for epidemiology and infection prevention at UC Irvine's School of Medicine

COVID-19 AMA Spring Wave, Variants, When The Vaccine Will Be Ready For Kids And More

AirTalk Episode Thursday April 15, 2021

Today on AirTalk, we break down the latest COVID-19 news. Also on the show, we discuss Biden's move to withdraw troops in Afghanistan by Sept. 11; talk about Facebook's move to create a kid-friendly Instagram app; and more.

In New Book, The 'Mothers' Of NPR Get Their Due

Just in time for NPR's 50th birthday, a new book spotlights the four so-called 'mothers' of NPR: Susan Stamberg, Linda Wertheimer, Nina Totenberg and Cokie Roberts. "Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie" looks at how these four influential voices helped the organization—celebrating its 50th birthday this year— become the major power player it is today. Journalist Susan Stamberg co-hosted All Things Considered and became the first woman to host a national news broadcast. Linda Wertheimer still reports as a senior national correspondent, as does Nina Totenberg, an award-winning legal affairs correspondent. Cokie Roberts passed away in 2019, and prior to her death she spent decades as a political reporter and analyst for NPR and ABC News. Today on AirTalk, we discuss the early years of NPR with Lisa Napoli. Questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722. With guest host Austin Cross Guest: Lisa Napoli, author of many books including her latest, "Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie" (Abrams Press, 2021); former reporter at Marketplace, The New York Times and other outlets; she tweets @lisanapoli

What US Troop Withdrawal From Afghanistan Means For International Politics, The Future Of ...

President Joe Biden said Wednesday he will withdraw remaining U.S. troops from the "forever war" in Afghanistan, declaring that the Sept. 11 attacks cannot justify American forces still being there 20 years after the deadliest terror assault on the United States. His plan is to pull out all American forces - numbering 2,500 now - by this Sept. 11, the anniversary of the attacks, which were coordinated from Afghanistan. The drawdown would begin rather than conclude by May 1, which has been the deadline for full withdrawal under a peace agreement the Trump administration reached with the Taliban last year. The decision marks perhaps the most significant foreign policy decision for Biden in the early going of his presidency. He's long been skeptical about the U.S. presence in Afghanistan. As Barack Obama's vice president, Biden was a lonely voice in the administration who advised the 44th president to tilt towards a smaller counterterrorism role in the country while military advisers were urging a troop buildup to counter Taliban gains. Biden has also made clear he wants to recalibrate U.S. foreign policy to face bigger challenges posed by China and Russia. Withdrawing all U.S. troops comes with clear risks. It could boost the Taliban's effort to claw back power and undo gains toward democracy and women's rights made over the past two decades. It also opens Biden to criticism, mostly Republicans and some Democrats, even though former President Donald Trump had also wanted a full withdrawal. While Biden's decision keeps U.S. forces in Afghanistan four months longer than initially planned, it sets a firm end to two decades of war that killed more than 2,200 U.S. troops, wounded 20,000, and cost as much as $1 trillion. Today on AirTalk, we'll talk about what the troop withdrawal means for the future of U.S.-Afghan relations and for the U.S. presence and influence in the Middle East, and look back on what has happened in the two decades since American troops first landed in Afghanistan following 9/11. We reached out to the State Department to request that someone be made available, but they were not able to provide a representative for us at the time we requested. With files from the Associated Press With guest host Austin Cross Guests: James Schwemlein, senior director at the Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategic advisory and commercial diplomacy firm, and a nonresident scholar in the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; he is a former senior advisor to the U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. State Department; he tweets @JamesSchwemlein Col. (ret.) Arnold V. Strong, retired U.S. Army colonel and public affairs officer, and former chief of Training and Operations Mentor at Kabul Military Training Center in Afghanistan from 2006-2007, where he trained members of the Afghan National Army; he currently serves as a senior partner at the Long Beach office Global Vantage Capital, a venture capital and private equity firm based in New York City; he tweets @arnoldvstrong

What US Troop Withdrawal From Afghanistan Means For International Politics, The Future Of ...

A Police Officer Was Fired For Intervening In Colleague's Chokehold In 2006. Why It Matter...

A judge has ruled that the firing of a police officer, who's black, in 2006 was wrong. Cariole Horne intervened when she saw a fellow officer put a man in a chokehold. Horne was fired soon after the incident, but she didn't give up the fight. According to the New York Times, the court ruling rewrites the ending of Horne's career in the police force, giving her access to back pay and other benefits. Today on AirTalk, we talk with a reporter who's been following the latest on Horne's case and discuss why it's taken so long to get to this point. Plus, we discuss what it means for the future of reporting excessive force behaviors in the police force, all as eyes are on Minneapolis during the trial of Derek Chauvin for the killing of George Floyd. Do you have thoughts or questions? Call 866-893-5722. Guests: Jonah E. Bromwich, a courts reporter for the New York Times, his latest piece is "Court Vindicates Black Officer Fired for Stopping Colleague's Chokehold;" he tweets @Jonesieman Tommy W. Tunson, retired chief of police in California with 30 years experience in law enforcement in cities including Calexico, Coachella, South Gate and Arvin; he's now a criminal justice professor at Bakersfield College

A Police Officer Was Fired For Intervening In Colleague's Chokehold In 2006. Why It Matter...

Children's Groups Push Back Against Instagram App In Development For Young Children

Anyone that has spent time around young kids and cell phones probably knows how adept children are at using social media apps. That's part of the reason why executives at Instagram announced last month that they are developing a new version of the app for children under the age of 13. They say it will keep children safer from bullying and sexual predation. But a coalition of 35 children's and consumer groups are pushing back on that idea, saying that 10- to 12- year olds will be unlikely to switch to the kid's app, and it could hook even younger children into the more toxic aspects of Instagram's culture. "While collecting valuable family data and cultivating a new generation of Instagram users may be good for Facebook's bottom line," the groups, led by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood in Boston, said in the letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, "it will likely increase the use of Instagram by young children who are particularly vulnerable to the platform's manipulative and exploitative features." Today on AirTalk, we're learning more about the controversy around Instagram's potential children's app. Are you the parent of a young child? What are your thoughts? Give us a call at 866-893-5722 or comment below. Guests: Ryan Mac, senior technology reporter at Buzzfeed News; he tweets @RMac18 Yalda T. Uhls, adjunct professor of child psychology at UCLA and founder of The Center for Scholars & Storytellers, a think tank dedicated to bridging the gap between academia and the entertainment industry; she is also the author of "Media Moms & Digital Dads: A Fact-Not-Fear Approach to Parenting in the Digital Age" (Routledge, 2015); she tweets @DrYaldaUhls

Children's Groups Push Back Against Instagram App In Development For Young Children

DOC AMA Vaccine Eligibility Expansion, J&J Vaccine Latest, Breakthrough Cases And More

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, we speak with UCSF's Dr. Peter Chin-Hong. Today's topics include: Vaccine appointments open to all over 16 in California Plus, when will vaccines be determined safe for those under 16? A CDC committee has extended the pause on the J&J vaccine Who's most affected by the pause? Likely it's underserved communities Breakthrough cases: The CDC found that a small group of patients got COVID even after vaccination - including 12 people in L.A. County A research project led by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health determined that neighborhoods with the worst air quality in L.A. County had the highest rate of COVID deaths How worried should we be about the variants The Staples Center is reopening at limited capacity today with the Lakers playing the Boston Celtics - so, it's a good time to review best practices for moving about in the world Some are experiencing social anxiety as COVID restrictions ease With guest host Austin Cross Guest: Peter Chin-Hong, M.D., infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine at the UCSF Medical Center; he tweets @PCH_SF

DOC AMA Vaccine Eligibility Expansion, J&J Vaccine Latest, Breakthrough Cases And More

AirTalk Episode Wednesday April 14 ,2021

Today on AirTalk, we discuss the latest developments on the Derek Chauvin murder trial and talk about the unrest over the killing of Daunte Wright. Also on the show, we cover the latest COVID-19 news; analyze the TelevisaUnivision merger; and more.

New Book 'Rock Me On The Water' Dives Into Why 1974 Was Such A Crucial Year For LA In Movi...

While it might seem like any other year in the city's history, 1974 was a huge year for Los Angeles, particularly in pop culture. It was a year in which a handful of pioneering and legendary figures in the fields of film, TV, and music that were all indicators of the changing social, cultural and political demographics of America. Legendary films like "Chinatown" and "The Godfather Part II" were released and the first draft screenplay of a movie called "Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope" was finished. Musical acts like Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and The Eagles and others broke touring records worldwide. In his new book "Rock Me on the Water: 1974-The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television, and Politics" veteran journalist and Pulitzer Prize finalist Ron Brownstein looks back at the significance of 1974 to Los Angeles in its illustrious pop culture history and how the music, TV and movies that came out of it spawned a pop culture revolution across the nation. Guest: Ron Brownstein, author of "Rock Me on the Water: 1974-The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television, and Politics" (Harper Collins, March 2021); he is senior editor at The Atlantic, a senior political analyst for CNN, and has served as the national political correspondent and national affairs columnist for The Los Angeles Times and covered the White House and national politics for the National Journal; he tweets @RonBrownstein

New Book 'Rock Me On The Water' Dives Into Why 1974 Was Such A Crucial Year For LA In Movi...

A New California Bill Seeks To Address Racial And Economic Inequities Through Public Banking

Several state lawmakers have signed on to a new bill that would offer California households free financial services— a move that could help families navigate the economic fallout from the pandemic. If it's passed, the bill would create BankCal, the first state government program in the nation to offer universal consumer banking. Through the program, participants could receive no-fee debit cards, direct deposits from employers and government agencies, electronic bill payment and ATM access, directly competing with private banks. The California Bankers Association opposes the bill, and argues that the state's financial institutions already offer lower cost banking options. But the issues of the "underbanked" have become increasingly central during the COVID-19 pandemic, as racial and economic inequities widen. "The bill creates a way for Californians to bank without paying exorbitant fees — money that could be used for food and rent or rebuilding from the economic devastation wreaked by the pandemic," said Assemblyman Miguel Santiago (D-Los Angeles), a lead author of the measure, Assembly Bill 1177. "If a rich person earns money, that money makes money. When a poor person earns money, that money is gouged from every corner. Financial institutions make enormous profit off the backs of those who ... they say they help." Today on AirTalk, we're learning more about the California Public Banking Option Act. Questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722. Guests: Jyotswaroop Bawa, organizing and campaigns director for the California Reinvestment Coalition, which focuses on financial and banking needs in communities of color and low-income communities and is based in San Francisco; she tweets @JyotswaroopK Rodney Ramcharan, professor of finance and business economics at USC, he served as the first chief of the Systemic Financial Institutions and Markets Section at the Board Governors of the Federal Reserve System Jack Humphreville, commentator on local and state budget and politics matters, member of the Neighborhood Council Budget Advocates, a group that gives feedback to city leaders on the budget, and a contributor to CityWatch, an online publication covering issues involving the City of Los Angeles; he tweets @Jack90020

A New California Bill Seeks To Address Racial And Economic Inequities Through Public Banking

Derek Chauvin Murder Trial Defense Witness Takes The Stand, Unrest After Daunte Wright Sho...

A use-of-force expert testified that former Officer Derek Chauvin was justified in pinning George Floyd to the ground because of his frantic resistance, contradicting a parade of authorities from both inside and outside the Minneapolis Police Department. Taking the stand at Chauvin's murder trial for the defense Tuesday, Barry Brodd, a former Santa Rosa, California, police officer, said officers don't have to wait for something bad to happen; they need only to have a reasonable fear that there's a threat and then adjust their actions accordingly. Several top Minneapolis police officials — including the police chief — have testified that Chauvin used excessive force and violated his training. And medical experts called by prosecutors have testified that Floyd died from a lack of oxygen because of the way he was restrained. Brodd also appeared to endorse what prosecution witnesses have said is a common misconception: that if someone can talk, he or she can breathe. Chauvin, a 45-year-old white man, is on trial on charges of murder and manslaughter in Floyd's death last May after his arrest of suspicion of passing a counterfeit $20 at a neighborhood market. Chauvin attorney Eric Nelson has argued that the 19-year Minneapolis police veteran did what he was trained to do and that Floyd died because of his illegal drug use and underlying health problems, including high blood pressure and heart disease. Fentanyl and methamphetamine were discovered in his system. As the defense began presenting its case on Tuesday after the prosecution rested following 11 days of testimony and a mountain of video evidence, Nelson sought to plant doubt in jurors' minds. He brought up a 2019 arrest in which Floyd suffered from dangerously high blood pressure and confessed to heavy use of opioids, and he suggested that the Black man may have suffered from "excited delirium" — what a witness described as a potentially lethal state of agitation and even superhuman strength that can be triggered by drug use, heart disease or mental problems. Today on AirTalk, we talk with a reporter who's been covering the aftermath of the killing of Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. Plus, legal experts share their thoughts on what's expected during Chauvin's trial over the next several weeks. Do you have thoughts or questions? Call 866-893-5722. With files from the Associated Press Guests: Matt Sepic, reporter with Minnesota Public Radio News who's been following the aftermath of the shooting of Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota; he tweets @msepic Daniel Herbert, Chicago defense attorney and former police officer and prosecutor; he tweets @DanielQHerbert Stanley Goldman, professor of criminal law and procedure at Loyola Law School, he previously served as an LA County deputy public defender for eight years

Derek Chauvin Murder Trial Defense Witness Takes The Stand, Unrest After Daunte Wright Sho...

TelevisaUnivision Diving Into The Media Merger

Grupo Televisa, Mexico's largest television network, announced Tuesday it is joining with U.S. Spanish-language broadcaster Univision to form a third company that will produce content for both that will be the "definitive global leader in Spanish-language media." The new company will be known as TelevisaUnivision. Both firms have been struggling to capture a share of the booming over-the-top video services sector. Televisa said the new company will be in charge of producing shows, distributing and marketing for both Televisa and Univision and also will create a new streaming channel. With files from the Associated Press. Guests: Julio Rumbaut, president of Rumbaut & Company, a media advisory and consulting firm that specializes in Spanish-language media; he tweets @juliorumbaut Melita Garza, associate professor of journalism at Texas Christian University and author of "They Came to Toil: Newspaper Representations of Mexicans and Immigrants in the Great Depression" (University of Texas Press, February 2018)

DOC AMA CDC Advisers Will Meet About Johnson & Johnson Vaccine, Orange County Will Offer D...

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Tim Brewer from UCLA. Today's topics include: OC will offer digital vaccine record as an option, not a mandate Regular exercise may help protect against severe COVID-19 CDC advisers will meet today about the J&J COVID-19 vaccine Why aren't more men getting the COVID-19 vaccine? Guest: Timothy Brewer, M.D., epidemiologist and professor of medicine at UCLA's school of public health; has served on the advisory boards of the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention

DOC AMA CDC Advisers Will Meet About Johnson & Johnson Vaccine, Orange County Will Offer D...

AirTalk Episode Tuesday April 13, 2021

Today on AirTalk, we check in on the reopening of LAUSD elementary schools and early education centers. Also on the show, we discuss the latest reporting on mistreatments within a state nursing home chain; discuss the closure of ArcLight and Pacific Theaters; and more.

After Pandemic Losses, ArcLight And Pacific Theaters Plan To Close For Good

The iconic Cinerama Dome in Hollywood, beloved by filmmakers and film lovers alike, is one of 300 Pacific Theaters screens set to close down permanently after the pandemic. "This was not the outcome anyone wanted, but despite a huge effort that exhausted all potential options, the company does not have a viable way forward," a Pacific Theaters representative said in a written statement. Pacific Theaters is also the operator of the multiplexes at The Grove and The Americana, which function as important anchors to both shopping centers. The closures come as Los Angeles County recently expanded capacity for indoor moviegoing to 50%— but after over a year with shut doors, the economic effects of the pandemic have proven too catastrophic for smaller chains. Major Hollywood power players took to Twitter to mourn the loss of the ArcLight Hollywood, housed inside a concrete geodesic dome (the only one of its kind in the world) and featured prominently in films like "Once Upon A Time In Hollywood." Today on AirTalk, we want to hear your thoughts about the Pacific Theaters closures and the loss of LA's iconic Cinerama Dome. Comment below or give us a call at 866-893-5722. Guest: Anthony D'Alessandro, editorial director and box office editor at Deadline who has been covering this story; he tweets @AwardsTony

After Pandemic Losses, ArcLight And Pacific Theaters Plan To Close For Good

Latest Reports Show Mistreatment Of California Nursing Homes Residents And Staff

At a nursing home in Glendale, a certified nursing assistant was charged with raping a mentally ill patient in her room. After the incident, according to investigators, the victim said she felt "scared, sad, wanted to kill herself." At a facility in Simi Valley, the daughter of one elderly resident told LAist that staff didn't adequately care for her mother, who developed a gruesome bedsore. "I could stick my pinky in it," she said. "It was down to the bone." At a nursing home in Compton, a schizophrenic patient with one leg was inappropriately discharged. He went missing, only to turn up two weeks later in a park, unconscious, under his wheelchair. Regulators charged that the facility's lapses presented "imminent danger or a substantial probability" that if the man hadn't been found, he would have suffered grave harm, even death. All three nursing homes are connected to ReNew Health Group, a fast-growing chain of skilled nursing facilities founded in 2014 and headquartered in Southern California. ReNew Health and its CEO, Crystal Solorzano, own or are affiliated with at least 26 facilities throughout the state. Solorzano owns, or is applying to own, the majority of them; in five other facilities her company has been involved in management or in administration. The network stretches from Orange County to the Central Valley to the Bay Area. In its short time caring for California's most vulnerable — many of them elderly and mentally ill — the company has racked up an inordinate number of red flags and citations, many for infractions known as "Immediate Jeopardies," the most severe federal citation a nursing home can receive. Today on AirTalk, we talk to reporters from LAist and CalMatters to discuss their reporting on issues residents and workers have faced in nursing homes across California, as well as get legal insights on the subject. Questions? Call us at 866-893-5722. With files from LAist. Read more here. We reached out to the California Association of Health Facilities, the non profit trade association that represents skilled-nursing facilities and intermediate-care facilities for people with intellectual disabilities across the state of California, but they declined our interview request. Guests: Aaron Mendelson, investigative reporter at KPCC; he tweets @a_mendelson Elly Yu, investigative reporter at KPCC; she tweets @ellywyu Jocelyn Weiner, health reporter for CalMatters, her latest piece is "California oversight of nursing homes called 'befuddling,' 'broken'", she tweets @jocelynwiener Mike Dark, staff attorney for California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform

Latest Reports Show Mistreatment Of California Nursing Homes Residents And Staff

Parents React As First Wave Of LAUSD Students Return To Campus In Person

A relative handful of Los Angeles Unified School District campuses will welcome students back this week, exactly one year and one month since the COVID-19 pandemic forced the state's largest school district into online-only mode. The beginning of LAUSD's reopening marks a huge turning point in efforts to resume in-person instruction in California's K-12 schools. This week, students at 72 LAUSD elementary schools and early education centers will begin coming back to campuses in waves. LAUSD kindergarteners and first graders at these campuses will return on Tuesday. Second and third graders will join them on Wednesday. The oldest elementary students will return on Thursday. This is just LAUSD's soft opening: there are more than 700 elementary schools in LAUSD, and most of them will reopen next week. Middle- and high schools reopen the week of April 26. Today on AirTalk, we'll check in on how things are going at LAUSD schools where kids are returning for in-person learning and hear from parents about how they and their kids are feeling about it. Join the live conversation by calling us at 866-893-5722. Guest: Kyle Stokes, education reporter for KPCC/LAist covering K-12 education; he tweets @kystokes

Parents React As First Wave Of LAUSD Students Return To Campus In Person

COVID-19 AMA What's Going On With J&J Vaccine, Latest On Variants And More

In our continuing series looking at the latest medical research and news on COVID-19, Larry Mantle speaks with Dr. Kimberly Shriner of Huntington Hospital. Topics today include: U.S. urges pause in use of J&J vaccine due to blood clotting issue A year into the pandemic, it's even more clear that it's safer to be outside Recent rise in U.S. COVID-19 cases driven by younger people New study finds U.K. variant no more deadly than original virus strain What to do with your COVID-19 vaccine card, including if you lose it Are herd immunity and the California coronavirus variant preventing a West Coast spring surge? Guest: Kimberly Shriner, M.D., infectious disease specialist at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena

COVID-19 AMA What's Going On With J&J Vaccine, Latest On Variants And More

AirTalk Episode Monday April 12, 2021

Today on AirTalk, we break down the latest COVID-19 news. Also on the show, we discuss the latest on the Tejon Ranch housing project; analyze what the defeated Amazon union effort means for the future of unions in the country; and more.

What Amazon Union's Defeat Means For The PRO Act And The Future Of Unions In The United States

Workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama handed the online retail giant a decisive victory when they voted against forming a union and cut off a path that labor activists had hoped would lead to similar efforts throughout the company and beyond. After months of aggressive campaigning from both sides, 1,798 warehouse workers ultimately rejected the union while 738 voted in favor of it, according to the National Labor Relations Board, which is overseeing the process. Of the 3,117 votes cast, 76 were voided for being filled out incorrectly and 505 were contested by either Amazon or the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, which led the organizing efforts in Bessemer. But the NLRB said the contested votes were not enough to sway the outcome. About 53% of the nearly 6,000 workers cast their ballots. In February, the Democratic-controlled House approved a bill that would make it easier for workers to form unions and bargain for higher wages, better benefits and improved working conditions. President Biden recommended the PRO Act to be a part of his infrastructure package. The "Protecting the Right to Organize" or PRO Act would allow more workers to conduct organizing campaigns and would add penalties for companies that violate workers' rights. The act would also weaken "right-to-work" laws that allow employees in more than half the states to avoid participating in or paying dues to unions that represent workers at their places of employment. In one of its most controversial provisions, the bill would close loopholes that allow what supporters call intentional misclassification of workers as supervisors and independent contractors in order to prevent them from joining a union. Today on AirTalk, we're learning more about the significance of Amazon's triumph over the Bessamer unionization effort, what the implications could be for the PRO Act and how it all fits into the larger picture of unions in America. Questions? Give us a call at 866-893-5722. With files from the Associated Press GUESTS: Karen Weise, technology reporter for The New York Times covering Amazon; she tweets @KYWeise Rebecca Givan, associate professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Nelson Lichtenstein, professor of history at the University of California Santa Barbara where he directs the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; he tweets @NelsonLichtens1

What Amazon Union's Defeat Means For The PRO Act And The Future Of Unions In The United States

A New Project Aims To Identify Landmarks Connected To Black LA History What Would You Like...

Last week, Getty and the city of Los Angeles announced the African American Historic Places Project, a new program aimed at identifying and preserving historic Black landmarks in the city. The three-year initiative aims to rectify a glaring disparity in LA landmark designations— only 3% of current landmarks are connected to Black heritage and history. "There's much work to be done to rectify that disparity and ensure that the heritage of African Americans in Los Angeles is fully woven into our historic designation, and recognition of historic places in Los Angeles," said Ken Bernstein, principal city planner and manager of the Office of Historic Resources. The Getty and the city are actively searching for a project leader with the help of an advisory group, and will work with local communities and cultural institutions to identify landmarks. The initiative also aims to reconsider what a "landmark" might be; while landmark designation is often granted to buildings, leaders are interested in expanding the boundaries of this classification to include more intangible spaces that honor African-American heritage in the city. Today on AirTalk, we want to hear from you. What histories, destinations or cultural landmarks connected to Black Angeleno heritage would you like to see designated as landmarks? Give us a call at 866-893-5722 or comment below. GUESTS: Sara Lardinois, project manager of the Los Angeles African American Historic Places Project at the Getty Conservation Institute; she tweets @LardinoisSara Susan D. Anderson, history curator and project manager at the California African American Museum who sits on the advisory panel for the project; she tweets @SusanDAnderson_

A New Project Aims To Identify Landmarks Connected To Black LA History What Would You Like...

What's Next For The Tejon Ranch Project After Judge Blocks Construction Due To Wildfire Risk

A long-running plan to build a community of 19,000 homes on vast Tejon Ranch north of Los Angeles has been halted by a judge who cited high wildfire risk. Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff on Tuesday rejected Los Angeles County's approval of the developer's environmental impact report, effectively blocking construction. The judge cited aspects of the environmental review concerning fire danger and additional greenhouse gases generated by vehicles, the Los Angeles Times reported. The ruling does not kill the project on the southern flanks of the Tehachapi Mountains near the Kern County border, the newspaper said, but it does threaten to delay it significantly. The Center for Biological Diversity, one of the project's most vocal opponents, hailed the judge's decision. The project's developer said the ruling would merely delay construction. The Centennial development has faced significant opposition since it was proposed by Tejon Ranch Co. in 1999. Opponents cite impacts on plant and animal habitats, earthquake and wildfire hazards, traffic congestion and pollution, among others. Advocates say Centennial would bring housing, jobs and revenues to the county, as well as needed infrastructure in the region 70 miles (112. kilometers) north of downtown Los Angeles. Today on AirTalk, we'll talk about what's next for Tejon Ranch and hear how environmental advocates plan to work with the developers as the project progresses. With files from the Associated Press We invited Tejon Ranch Company to join our discussion, but they could not make someone available to speak with us at the time of our interview. GUESTS: J.P. Rose, staff attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity; he tweets @JPRose5 Ethan Elkind, director of the Climate Program at Center for Law, Energy & the Environment at UC Berkeley; he also leads the Climate Change and Business Research Initiative on behalf of UC Berkeley Law and UCLA Law With contributions from Manny Valladares

What's Next For The Tejon Ranch Project After Judge Blocks Construction Due To Wildfire Risk