Midday on WYPR From WYPR 88.1 FM in Baltimore. On Midday, Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall’s talking about what’s on your mind, and what matters most to Marylanders: the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine.
Midday on WYPR

Midday on WYPR

From WYPR - 88.1 FM Baltimore

From WYPR 88.1 FM in Baltimore. On Midday, Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall’s talking about what’s on your mind, and what matters most to Marylanders: the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine.More from Midday on WYPR »

Most Recent Episodes

The Kids Count Report: Tracking Child Welfare in America

It's back-to-school time for many of our nation's young people, and today we are taking a look at the status of children in our state and ac ross the country. The 2017 Kids Count Data Book , a new report from the Annie E Casey Foundation , ranks all 50 states by measures of health, education, economic well-being and more. As more than 16 million American children currently live in poverty, our panel considers how to best meet the challenges that this most vulnerable segment of our population

"Policing The Black Man:" Do Black Lives Matter To The Courts?

"Do black lives matter to the courts?" It's the question raised time and time again when unarmed black men are killed by police and the officers are either not indicted, or not convicted. It's the question raised by NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Sherrilyn Ifill in a new collection of essays called Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution and Imprisonment . Professor Angela J. Davis is the collection's editor. She's a law professor at American University's Washington

Barbara Bradley Hagerty: On "Life Reimagined"

(This program originally aired on April 25, 2017) Today, it's Midday on Mid Life. Mid Life can be a dizzying hash of juggling jobs, keeping a marriage vibrant, tending to children as they enter adulthood, and caring for parents as they enter their twilight years. No wonder the term "midlife" so often has the word "crisis" attached to it like a tentacle. But our 40s, 50s and 60s can also be a time when we come into our own, forge new relationships, and discover fresh things about the world and

The Urban Forest: Why It's Crucial

(This program originally aired on Nov. 22, 2016) When you look up, what do you see? If you're in Baltimore and many other U.S. cities, what you see are trees. When viewed from above, the tree canopy, as it is known, covers more than 27% of Baltimore. And, if today's urban arborists have their way, that figure will be significantly higher 20 years from now. Today, a conversation about urban forests. What purpose do they serve in our daily lives? Who planted them, and why? What lessons did we

A Sermon To White America From Dr. Michael Eric Dyson

(This program originally aired January 18, 2017) This week, we are taking a look back at the Presidency of Barack Obama. Tom is joined by Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, a searing provocateur whose unstinting critique of the historic nature of Obama's tenure includes what he considers to be the missed opportunities to advance the cause of racial equality. One of Dyson's chief criticisms is the President's reluctance to hold white people at least partially responsible for black suffering. In his latest

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie On Her Latest Book "Dear Ijeawele"

(This program originally aired on April 18, 2017) Tom is joined today by Nigerian author, essayist and activist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie . She splits her time between her native country Nigeria and the US, where she has a home in Columbia, Maryland. She's won several prestigious awards, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. She's headlining the 2017 Baltimore CityLit Festival later this month. That's an annual event sponsored by the CityLit

"They Can't Kill Us All": Reporter Wesley Lowery's Account of Police Assaults on Blacks

(This program originally aired March 13, 2017 Their names are familiar: Freddie Gray, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice...and others. Young, unarmed black men killed by police. Their common, tragic fates and what led to them are the focus of Tom's conversation today with Wesley Lowery . Lowery is a Washington Post reporter who's been on the ground covering incidents of police violence since protests erupted in Ferguson, Missouri, following the death of Michael Brown. Lowery's new book examines law enforcement culture and the legacy of unconstitutional treatment of African-Americans that continues to seed mistrust between police and communities of color. "For most white Americans," Lowery tells Tom, "the police are someone you call when you are in trouble. For most black and brown Americans, the police are an oppressive force, who they see as harassing them and interacting with them in ways that could lead to them being dead." A Midday Special Edition: Pulitzer Prize-winning author Wesley Lowery

"They Can't Kill Us All": Reporter Wesley Lowery's Account of Police Assaults on Blacks

Midday News Wrap 8.18.17

It's the Midday News Wrap , our review of the week's top news stories, with a rotating panel of journalists and commentators. Protesting the planned removal of a Confederate monument was the pretext for a Unite the Right rally by armed neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klansmen in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. Dozens were injured in the ensuing melee with counter protesters, and a young woman named Heather Hyer was killed when a white nationalist drove his car into the crowd. President Trump angered critics and supporters alike with his shifting analyses of the violence in Charlottesville, his refusal to unequivocally denounce the white supremacist groups by name, and his insistence that counter-protesters share equal blame for the weekend violence. In the days that followed, Confederate-themed monuments became rallying points for anti-racism protests and criticism in many US cities, resulting in the removal of monuments here in Baltimore and North Carolina, with other states, including

Monday's Solar Eclipse: Md. Science Center's Jim O'Leary Gives Us The 411

Jim O'Leary, the lead space science and astronomy specialist at the Maryland Science Center , speaks with Tom about the partial solar eclipse that will be visible here in Maryland on Monday afternoon. Although Maryland is not in the path of totality, if weather conditions are right, we will experience a hearty partial solar eclipse — a celestial phenomenon only slightly less remarkable than totality.

Monday's Solar Eclipse: Md. Science Center's Jim O'Leary Gives Us The 411

Symphony Number One, Live in Studio

Conductor Jordan Randall Smith joins Tom in the Midday studio, along with two members of his 20-piece chamber orchestra, Symphony Number One : clarinetist Scott Johnson and bassoonist Mateen Milan . Smith founded the classical ensemble two years ago and already they've released two albums and given world premiere performances of more thana dozen works. The two SNO musicians perform live in the Midday studio and Smith, Johnson and Milan discuss the finer points of working in a small classical orchestra. Playlist: Beethoven, Duo No. 1 for Clarinet and Bassoon Scott Joplin, The Entertainer For more information on all upcoming concerts please visit symphonynumber.one/eve .

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