The People's Pharmacy Radio Program Everything from home remedies to the latest breakthrough drugs are discussed on The People's Pharmacy. Pharmacologist Joe Graedon and medical anthropologist Terry Graedon talk to leading experts to discuss issues relating to drugs, herbs, home remedies, vitamins and related health topics.
The People's Pharmacy Radio Program

The People's Pharmacy Radio Program

From North Carolina Public Radio

Everything from home remedies to the latest breakthrough drugs are discussed on The People's Pharmacy. Pharmacologist Joe Graedon and medical anthropologist Terry Graedon talk to leading experts to discuss issues relating to drugs, herbs, home remedies, vitamins and related health topics.

Most Recent Episodes

Show 1160: How Good Is the Evidence for Cutting Salt?

For decades, public health experts have been admonishing Americans to cut the salt in our diets. In fact, the American Heart Association recommends that we limit ourselves to 2,300 mg of sodium daily. That's about one teaspoon. Ideally, the AHA says, we would get less than 1,500 mg of this crucial mineral every day. Should You Be Cutting Salt? Why is salt such a problem? People who consume large quantities of salt tend to have high blood pressure. When they reduce their sodium intake, their blood pressure often drops. But what about people who get ordinary amounts of salt in their food? Should they be struggling to cut back? Dr. Aaron Carroll is very conscious of the medical evidence for such recommendations. Surprisingly, what he says about salt restriction is that there isn't very much scientific data to support it. Because it has been dogma all these years, it sounds like heresy to suggest that cutting back on salt might not make very much difference for most people and could even be harmful for a few. Have health care providers embraced other recommendations despite a paucity of evidence? Call in your questions or observations: 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EDT on Saturday, April 13, 2019. Side Effects of Gabapentinoids: Doctors have recently started prescribing one group of medicines far more frequently than they once did. The gabapentinoids (gabapentin and pregabalin, aka Neurontin and Lyrica) were originally introduced as anticonvulsants. However, doctors now prescribe them widely for serious pain conditions on the assumption that they are safer than opioids. What evidence do we have for their effectiveness for pain. In addition, just how safe are they? Tom Moore of ISMP shares the results of the latest QuarterWatch on dangerous adverse effects of these medications. Call in your questions and stories about gabapentin or pregabalin: 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EDT, 4/13/19. Or send us email: radio@peoplespharmacy.com This Week's Guests: Thomas Moore is a senior scientist with the non-profit Institute for Safe Medication Practices and a lecturer at George Washington University School of Public Health. The most recent QuarterWatch was published on March 27, 2019. Aaron Carroll, MD, is a Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Dean for Research Mentoring at Indiana University's School of Medicine, and Director of the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Comparative Effectiveness Research. His research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care, health care policy, and health care reform. In addition to his scholarly activities, he has written about health, research, and policy for CNN, Bloomberg News, the JAMA Forum, and the Wall Street Journal. The photograph is copyright Marina Waters. He has co-authored three popular books debunking medical myths, has a popular YouTube show called Healthcare Triage, and is a regular contributor to the New York Times' The Upshot. Dr. Carroll's most recent book is The Bad Food Bible: How and Why to Eat Sinfully. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3 (Choose mp3 version from the pulldown menu above the "Add to Cart" button)

Show 1125: How Can You Find Your Sleep Solution? (Archive)

You may have read or heard that adequate sleep is a pillar of good health, like exercise and a healthy diet. Sleep affects blood pressure and heart disease, metabolism and obesity, the immune system, cognitive function and mood. But if you can't get enough sleep, that information is more frustrating than helpful. What is interfering with your sleep, and how can you find the best sleep solution? How Much Sleep Do You Really Need? Babies sleep a lot, and sometimes the very elderly do, too. How do sleep needs differ at various ages? How can you tell if you are really getting enough? Certain medications can make it difficult for people to fall asleep or stay asleep. Others may disrupt the normal stages of sleep. Which are the most common culprits, and what can be done about them? Sleeping Pills: People who frequently toss and turn at night may look to sleeping pills like eszopiclone (Lunesta), zaleplon (Sonata) and zolpidem (Ambien) as a sleep solution. What should you know about the benefits and risks of these medications? Other commonly used drugs such as trazodone and Seroquel have never even been approved for sleep problems. Over-the-counter sleep aids also have pros and cons. People who can't turn off their thoughts might want to consider a device called a MUSE that can help practice meditation and quieting brain activity. What Is Good Sleep Hygiene? When experts recommend "good sleep hygiene," what the heck do they mean? How much does it help to exercise early and take a hot bath an hour before bedtime? Find out about non-drug approaches to restless legs and other sleep problems. This Week's Guest: Dr. Chris Winter is a board certified sleep medicine specialist and neurologist. He has worked with professional sports organizations including the Cleveland Indians, The New York Rangers and the Oklahoma City Thunder. Since 2008 Dr Winter has served as the Men's Health magazine sleep advisor and he blogs for the Huffington Post. Dr. Winter owns Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine Clinic and CNSM consulting in Charlottesville VA. Dr. Winter is the author of The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep is Broken and How to Fix It His website: http://www.cvilleneuroandsleep.com/ Photo credit – Jen Fariello Photography Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3

Show 1159: Do Cold Sores Boost Your Risk for Dementia?

The past few months have produced some fascinating science stories from international sources. We interviewed two scientists in far-flung places to learn more about unexpected ways that microbes interact with us and affect our health. One researcher has developed some unique ways to study the microbiome of our digestive tract. Another is examining whether the herpes viruses that cause cold sores boost your risk of Alzheimer disease. How Does Our Gut Microbiota Respond to Probiotics? Dr. Eran Elinav works at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He has been studying the gut microbiota. Each of us carries a collection of microbes as unique as our fingerprints. Studying them isn't easy: not all of the bacteria and viruses in our digestive tracts show up in stool. Dr. Elinav and his colleagues used colonoscopies to collect good samples directly from the large intestine. In addition, they did an experiment to compare the effects of probiotics and placebo. Surprisingly, they found that some proportion of people are resistant to any changes wrought by the probiotics. Others who take probiotics make room for the new species, at least temporarily. What could account for the differences? Dr. Elinav's research group has also considered possible downsides from probiotics. To begin with, one way that people often use probiotics, or "beneficial bacteria," is to counteract the harm that antibiotics can do to our microbiota. How well do they work for that? You may be surprised at what the research showed. Do Cold Sores Boost Your Risk of Alzheimer Disease? Dr. Ruth Itzhaki of the University of Manchester in England has been studying microbes that get into the brain, especially the virus that causes cold sores. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) can travel along nerve cells and enter the brain. For years, Dr. Itzhaki has been collecting data suggesting that infection with HSV1 could contribute to the development of Alzheimer disease. Moreover, a fascinating study from Taiwan suggests that people who take antiviral drugs to suppress HSV1 are much less prone to this form of dementia. Who might benefit from such medications? This Week's Guests: Eran Elinav, MD, PhD, holds the Sir Marc & Lady Tania Feldmann Professorial Chair in Immunology at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. Dr. Elinav is HHMI & the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation International Research Scholar. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Canadian Institute For Advanced Research (CIFAR). The photo is of Dr. Elinav. His website is: http://www.weizmann.ac.il/immunology/elinav The research we discussed with him was published in Cell, Sep. 6, 2018. https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)31102-4 https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)31108-5 Ruth Itzhaki, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Molecular Neurobiology at the University of Manchester and Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. You can find her publications in Neurotherapeutics, Jan. 2019 and in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Oct. 19, 2018. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the free mp3 (Choose mp3 from the pulldown above the "Add to Cart" button.)

Show 1158: Will Hormone Disruptors Affect Your Children's Health?

Over the last several decades, our environment has changed enormously. Comparing a playground in 1962 to the same playground in 2019 gives some sense of how thoroughly we have surrounded ourselves and our children with chemicals that may have profound impacts on the hormones in our bodies. As just one example, bisphenol A found in hard clear plastics and the linings of cans can mimic estrogen to some extent. It might also disrupt the way we maintain our weight in a normal range, possibly contributing to the obesity epidemic. What other hormone disruptors are we being exposed to? DES as an Example of Hormone Disruptors: Some of the changes that researchers have unearthed in response to these endocrine disruptors might actually have trans-generational effects. That seems to be the case for DES, diethylstilbestrol. This estrogen mimic was prescribed to pregnant women for decades to prevent miscarriage. Although it wasn't effective for that purpose, it did have consequences for the children of the women who took it. Scientists are now studying the possibility that the grandchildren may also be affected. Are BPA Substitutes Safer? Public outcry has led companies to replace BPA in certain products. But are the replacements, such as BPS, any safer? That is not clear. How can we identify and avoid potential endocrine disruptors? Will exposure to endocrine disruptors reduce human fertility and make it harder for couples to conceive? Other Hormone Disruptors: Flame retardants, phthalates and chemical treatments to help fabric resist stains are widespread in our current environment. There are ways to minimize your exposure, however. Read the labels on any furniture you buy. Inspect the recycle code numbers on plastic containers before you purchase them and take them home. (Stay away from 1, 3 and 7.) Don't put your own plastic containers in the microwave or the dishwasher. Use glass containers for your food whenever you can. Eventually, consumers will need to pressure manufacturers to get endocrine disruptors out of the products we buy and use. This Week's Guest: Dr. Leonardo Trasande is an internationally renowned leader in children's environmental health and an associate professor in pediatrics, environmental medicine, and population health at New York University. He is also the Director of the Division of Environmental Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Pediatrics at NYU School of Medicine. Dr. Trasande is the author of Sicker, Fatter, Poorer: The Urgent Threat of Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals to Our Health and Future . . . and What We Can Do About It. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3

Show 1157: Why Are You Never Home Alone?

You may think your home is sparkling clean. But even a clean house harbors a host of small creatures that have a fascinating web of interactions with each other and with the humans who live there. What do you know about the ecology of your home? How does the dust that accumulates in the corners before you vacuum affect your health? Are there any advantages to cleaning less often? If you have ever wondered about the fungi in your shower, the bacteria on your soap or the camel crickets hiding out in the basement, call in your questions. Never Home Alone: Dr. Rob Dunn has written about the wilderness thriving in our living spaces in his book, Never Home Alone. He will tell you why you shouldn't overdo on the home hygiene and help you understand how to welcome our unseen guests safely. Join the Conversation: What creatures are lurking in your home? Is your air-conditioning system host to a special sort of ecological system? Call us to learn more about the varieties of life that may be sharing your space. 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EST on Saturday, March 16, 2019. Or send us email: radio@peoplespharmacy.com This Week's Guest: Rob Dunn, PhD, is Professor of Applied Ecology at North Carolina State University. Rob Dunn is the author of several books, including Never Out of Season and The Wildlife of our Bodies. His most recent book is Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live. http://robdunnlab.com/ Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3 (Choose mp3 version from the pull-down menu above the Add to Cart button)

Show 1156: How the Microbiota in the Good Gut Takes Care of You

Research over the past few decades has revealed that we humans host a bewildering variety of invisible creatures, our microbiota. We can almost envision the collective genome of all these microbes, the microbiome, as a sort of second genome for human individuals. Unlike our human genome, the microbiome can be altered based on our diet and factors such as whether we have taken antibiotics. The exact balance of microbes in our intestinal ecology varies from one person to another. It may be time to jettison the old notion that all microbes are "germs" that will do us harm and learn how to appreciate microbial diversity. How does our microbiota influence our health? Where Do the Microbes Come From? How does a baby acquire its intestinal inhabitants? How do they change throughout the life cycle? The microbiota has significant effects on behavior, cognition and the immune system, as well as digestive well-being. Since the health of our microbiota is intimately linked to our own health, how should we be caring for it? Can You Reprogram Your Microbiota? Doctors begin to suspect that imbalances in the microbiota may be at the root of serious problems such as inflammatory bowel disease. The classic example of microbiota imbalance causing digestive disease is C diff infection. This diarrheal disease often occurs when many of the gut microbes are wiped out by antibiotic treatment. As a result, Clostridium difficile has an open niche to exploit. Once firmly established, these bacteria can be hard to eradicate. Recently, doctors have resorted to fecal microbiota transplant from healthy donors to treat serious C diff infections. Taking Care of Our Microbiota: How do we take care of our microbiota so it can take good care of us? One approach is to make sure we eat what the microbiota wants. Mostly, that means a high-fiber plant-based diet with relatively little red meat or sugar. In addition, fermented foods can be helpful. When we consume foods with live bacteria such as kombucha, kimchi, kefir, sauerkraut, real pickles or yogurt, we are getting living probiotics that may bolster the microbiota. What else should you be doing? This Week's Guests: Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, is currently an associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Stanford School of Medicine. Erica Sonnenburg, PhD, is currently a senior research scientist at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, where she studies the role of diet on the human intestinal microbiota. Drs. Sonnenburg are co-authors of The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-Term Health. http://sonnenburglab.stanford.edu/ Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3

Show 1155: Can Bacteriophages Save Your Life?

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been cropping up around the world. These superbugs cause serious problems, especially when they fail to respond to increasingly potent medications. One approach may be to put a very old, natural treatment to work. The theory is that the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Enlist viruses that infect these bacteria. How well do such bacteriophages work for killing superbugs? Killing Superbugs with Bacteriophages: The use of viruses for killing superbugs got its start many decades ago, even before there were superbugs. Researchers in the former Soviet Union (especially in the Soviet state of Georgia) developed bacteriophages to treat serious bacterial infections. Western countries were developing antibiotics at the same time, so they paid little attention to these viruses. Now, however, as bacteria have developed resistance to many antibiotics, researchers in the US are taking a second look at using bacteriophages for killing superbugs. We hear from a scientist at the University of California, San Diego, who is developing phage mixtures to treat multidrug-resistant pathogens. Saving Her Husband's Life: We also speak with an epidemiologist and public health expert who mobilized a last-ditch effort using bacteriophages for killing superbugs that threatened her husband's life. He had gone into a coma and was facing death because no antibiotics were working. So Dr. Steffanie Strathdee sought out bacteriophage researchers who could help. The effective strain of bacteriophage virus came from purified sewage from Texas. The UCSD team that saved his life has established a center further refining the use of these viruses. This Week's Guests: Steffanie A. Strathdee, PhD, is Associate Dean of Global Health Sciences and Harold Simon Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. She is also an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins and Simon Fraser Universities. She co-directs the UCSD Global Health Institute and the International Core of the University's Center for AIDS Research. She is also co-director of UCSD's new center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) https://ipath.ucsd.edu To email IPATH: IPATH@ucsd.edu Dr. Strathdee's TEDX talk is here. She is the author, with Tom Patterson, of the just-released The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug: A Memoir. You'll find more information about the UCSD program on bacteriophages here. Saima Aslam, MD, MS, is a board-certified infectious disease specialist. Her expertise is in caring for solid-organ transplant candidates and recipients as well as other immunocompromised individuals. Dr. Aslam directs UC San Diego Health's Solid Organ Transplant Infectious Diseases Service, which provides expert care in the prevention and management of infectious diseases in organ transplant donors and recipients. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD

Show 1154: How to Take Good Care of Your Eyesight

A national survey just a few years ago showed that Americans fear losing their vision more than they fear losing a limb, their hearing, their ability to speak or even their memory (Scott et al, JAMA Ophthalmology, October 2016). What do you know about how to take good care of your eyesight? What Can You Do About Dry Eyes? Dry eye is a very common condition with multiple possible causes. Tears have three different components. One is the liquid water phase. There is also a lipid phase that prevents rapid evaporation. In addition, a mucus phase helps the tears spread evenly over the surface of the eye. It is not just the quantity of tears but also their quality that matters. What can affect this? In certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or acne rosacea, dry eye syndrome signals a systemic problem. Medications such as antihistamines may also cause dry eyes. In addition, people staring at their computer screens or phones may forget to blink. This can quickly dry eyes out as well. Blinking more often can help, as can hot compresses. Our guest shared a home remedy for a stye on the eyelid. Microwave a small potato, wrap it in a dishtowel and hold it to the inflamed spot for 15 or 20 minutes. It stays hot much longer than a wet washcloth does. In addition, a Mediterranean diet rich in fish and olive oil provides dietary support to prevent dry eyes. Tips to Take Good Care of Your Eyesight: Ophthalmologists recognize diabetic retinopathy as the leading cause of visual impairment among working-age Americans. As a result, anyone with diabetes or pre-diabetes should see their eye doctor for regular screening. Among older adults, the leading cause of vision problems is age-related macular degeneration. In this condition, damage to the center of the retina impairs central vision, making it hard to read, play golf or even recognize friends' faces. Advances to Help You Take Good Care of Your Eyesight: Pharmacological advances have improved treatment of both age-related macular degeneration and another disease that becomes more common with aging, glaucoma. Glaucoma is often linked to increased pressure in the eye. In this condition, vision begins to fail at the periphery first. Unfortunately, people may not even notice the problem until it becomes fairly severe. That's why ophthalmologists measure eye pressure at every visit. Learn More: You can learn more about how to take good care of your eyesight, reduce the likelihood of nearsightedness in children, use optical coherence tomography (imaging of the retina) to detect early Alzheimer's disease by listening to the interview. Additionally, the podcast also includes information on vitamins to slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration and a discussion of cataract prevention and treatment. This Week's Guest: Peter J. McDonnell, MD, is the director of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute and professor of ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3 (Where it says "Choose CD or MP3 Version" above the "Add to Cart" button, select mp3.)

Show 1153: How to Listen to TV Drug Commercials

If you watch television, you can't avoid TV drug commercials for maladies from type 2 diabetes to auto-immune diseases like psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis to refractory cancers. Do you see these ads as providing the information you need about your medicines? Or do you perceive them as pushing viewers to request drugs that they may not really need? How do you find out what you need to know about the medicines you take? Can Your Pharmacist Help? Dr. Aaron Carroll of Indiana University's School of Medicine describes the possible benefits of really involving pharmacists in medication oversight. A recent study showed that pharmacists can help doctors deprescribe medications that may be unnecessary or even dangerous for older patients. Have you turned to your pharmacist for information on the drugs you take? Join the Conversation: We invite you to tell us where you find the information you seek. What do you glean from TV drug commercials? Does your prescriber provide everything you want or need to know? Do you find the leaflets dispensed by the pharmacy helpful? Or have you found another source? To share your story, you may call 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EST on Saturday, February 16, 2019. Or send us email: radio@peoplespharmacy.com This Week's Guest: Aaron Carroll, MD, is a Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Dean for Research Mentoring at Indiana University's School of Medicine, and Director of the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Comparative Effectiveness Research. His research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care, health care policy, and health care reform. In addition to his scholarly activities, he has written about health, research, and policy for CNN, Bloomberg News, the JAMA Forum, and the Wall Street Journal. The photograph is copyright Marina Waters. He has co-authored three popular books debunking medical myths, has a popular YouTube show called Healthcare Triage, and is a regular contributor to the New York Times' The Upshot. Dr. Carroll's most recent book is The Bad Food Bible: How and Why to Eat Sinfully. The research Dr. Carroll describes about pharmacists helping with deprescribing was published in JAMA on Nov. 13, 2018. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3 (Choose mp3 from the pulldown menu above the "Add to Cart" button)

Show 1152: Can You Conquer Your Cravings with Mindfulness?

Have you ever thought about how a bad habit gets started? You can blame the neural wiring and chemistry we share with all animals. When we do something that feels good in the moment, we remember it and are likely to repeat that action. But "feels good" doesn't always translate into "good for you." How can you conquer your cravings? Addiction can be defined as "continued use despite adverse consequences." By this definition, there are quite a few things we may be addicted to, including Good & Plenty or Gummy Worms candy. In addition to the obvious (tobacco, coffee, alcohol), there are behaviors like texting or anxiety that might not seem addictive but can become unhealthy. To change these habits, we need to pay attention to how the loop of trigger-behavior-reward works for us. How Can Mindfulness Help? Employing mindfulness just as you might use it during meditation can be useful. If you have ever tried to meditate, you know how hard it can be to keep your thoughts from wandering off. And perhaps you have been advised to recognize that detour, accept it, pay attention to how it feels and note what is happening from moment to moment. Recognizing the trigger, the behavior and how the reward actually feels can help you identify what you persist in doing despite adverse consequences. This type of mindfulness can also help you conquer your cravings and change your behavior. Changing the Reward to Conquer Your Cravings: If you want to change your behavior, you need to figure out how to change the way you react to the trigger. But first, you need to change the reward, and you need to make yourself a bigger, better offer. Can you substitute curiosity about how you are feeling and how that changes moment to moment for your craving? Mindfulness can help you bring your attention to the present without being judgmental. To learn more about how to manage anxiety, you may wish to visit the website UnwindingAnxiety.com. Dr. Brewer's app for people with disordered eating is Eat Right Now. And you'll find more evidence-based resources at JudsonBrewer.com. This Week's Guest: Judson Brewer, MD, PhD, is an internationally known thought leader in the field of habit change and the "science of self-mastery." His 20 years of experience with mindfulness training enhanced his scientific research. He is the Director of Research and Innovation at Brown University's Mindfulness Center and associate professor of psychiatry at the Medical School. Dr. Brewer has developed novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including smoking, stress eating, and anxiety (e.g. www.goeatrightnow.com, www.unwindinganxiety.com), and has studied their underlying brain mechanisms. His work has been featured on "60 Minutes," at TED.com (4th most viewed talk of 2016 with over 10 million views), in Time magazine, Forbes, NPR and the BBC among others. His website is www.judsonbrewer.com. You can follow him on Twitter: @JudsonBrewer His book is The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love – Why We Get Hooked and How We Can Break Bad Habits. Listen to the Podcast: The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99. Buy the CD Download the mp3 (Choose mp3 from the pulldown just above the orange "Add to Cart" button.)

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