Walter Edgar's Journal From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and The South.
Walter Edgar's Journal

Walter Edgar's Journal

From South Carolina Public Radio

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and The South.

Most Recent Episodes

Conversations on S.C. History: Women and World War I

Dr. Amy McCandless, professor emerita of history at the College of Charleston, joins Dr. Edgar for a public conversation on S.C. Women during World War I. Prior to that war, South Carolina was a predominantly rural state, with a Black majority populaltion. The typical S.C. woman in 1916 was Black, and, if she was employed, she was likely an agricultural worker or a domestic worker. If she was White, a working woman was likely on the farm or in a textile mill. There was a quite small middle class

Reconstruction and the African American Struggle for Equality in the South

Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has said, "Reconstruction is one of the most important and consequential chapters in American history. It is also among the most overlooked, misunderstood and misrepresented."

Reconstruction and the African American Struggle for Equality in the South

What Does Freedom Mean? The Agency of Black People Before and After Emancipation

On June 19th, 1865, Union general Gordon Granger read federal orders in Galveston, Texas, that all previously enslaved people in Texas were free. The news of Emancipation had finally come to the state. Today, this day is celebrated as Juneteenth. What did it mean to these newly freed people to "be free"? What power, or "agency" did freedom bring? What agency had the enslaved managed to create before Emancipation?

What Does Freedom Mean? The Agency of Black People Before and After Emancipation

The Winning of the American Revolution - in the South

General U.S. history courses in many high schools depict the American Revolutionary War as a series of battles in the Northeast--Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, etc.--that lead inexorably to British General Charles Cornwallis's surrender of 8,000 British soldiers and seamen to a French and American force at Yorktown, Virginia, October 19, 1781. The truth is much more complicated, of course. And a major component of the war, one that paved the way to Yorktown, was the fighting that took place in

The Colonial Carolina Frontier: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves

​In his book, C arolina in Crisis: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756 - 1763 , (2015, UNC Press) Dr. Daniel J. Tortora, assistant professor of history at Colby College, explores how the Anglo-Cherokee War reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the colonial South. Tortora joins Walter Edgar for a discussion of these events in one of a a series of public conversations, "Conversations on Colonial and Revolutionary South Carolina."

Why Southern Identity Still Matters

The American South has experienced remarkable change over the past half century. Black voter registration has increased, the region's politics have shifted, and in-migration has increased its population many fold. At the same time, many outward signs of regional distinctiveness have faded. But two professors of political science write that these changes have allowed for new types of Southern identity to emerge.

Reclaiming a Lost Hero of World War II

In November 1943, Marine 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr. was mortally wounded while leading a successful assault on a critical Japanese fortification on the Pacific atoll of Tarawa, and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor. The brutal, bloody 76-hour battle would ultimately claim the lives of more than 1,100 Marines and 5,000 Japanese forces. But Bonnyman's remains, along with those of hundreds of other Marines, were hastily buried and lost to history

"They Stole Him Out of Jail" - Willie Earle, South Carolina's Last Lynching Victim

In They Stole Him Out of Jail (2019, USC Press), William B. Gravely presents the most comprehensive account of the Willie Earle's lynching ever written, exploring it from background to aftermath and from multiple perspectives. Gravely meticulously re-creates the case's details, analyzing the flaws in the investigation and prosecution that led in part to the acquittals. Vivid portraits emerge of key figures in the story, including both Earle and cab driver T. W. Brown, Solicitor Robert T. Ashmore

"They Stole Him Out of Jail" - Willie Earle, South Carolina's Last Lynching Victim

Living by Inches: Captivity in Civil War Prisons

From battlefields, boxcars, and forgotten warehouses to notorious prison camps like Andersonville and Elmira, prisoners seemed to be everywhere during the American Civil War. Yet there is much we do not know about the soldiers and civilians whose very lives were in the hands of their enemies. On this week's Journal , Dr. Edgar talks with Dr. Evan Kutzler about Living by Inches (2019. UNC Press) , the first book to examine how imprisoned men in the Civil War perceived captivity through the basic

Go Inside Catering, the Food World's Riskiest Business with Matt and Ted Lee

This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , Mat Lee and Ted Lee drop in to talk about their new book, Hotbox: Inside Catering, the Food World's Riskiest Business (2019, Henry Holt). In Hotbox , the Lee brothers take on the competitive, wild world of high-end catering, exposing the secrets of a food business few home cooks or restaurant chefs ever experience. Known for their modern take on Southern cooking, the Lee brothers steeped themselves in the catering business for four years, learning the

Go Inside Catering, the Food World's Riskiest Business with Matt and Ted Lee

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