Walter Edgar's Journal From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and The South.
Walter Edgar's Journal

Walter Edgar's Journal

From South Carolina Public Radio

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and The South.More from Walter Edgar's Journal »

Most Recent Episodes

Lincoln's Unfinished Work

In the Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln spoke of the need to conclude "the unfinished work which they who fought here so nobly advanced." In his second Inaugural Address, he spoke in similar vein: "With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in." It's likely that, in Lincoln's mind, the most immediate "unfinished work" was the Civil War itself as well as many other unfinished tasks. An

Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, The Johnson Collection's new exhibition and its companion book, Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection, examine the particularly complex challenges Southern women artists confronted in a traditionally conservative region during a period in which women's social, cultural, and political roles were being redefined and reinterpreted. How did the variables of historical gender norms, educational barriers,

Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection

Uncompromising Activist: Richard Greener, First Black Professor at USC

(Originally broadcast 06/01/18) - Richard Theodore Greener (1844–1922) was a renowned black activist and scholar. The first black graduate of Harvard College, he became the first black faculty member at the University of South Carolina, during Reconstruction. He was even the first black US diplomat to a predominately-white country, serving in Vladivostok, Russia. A notable speaker and writer for racial equality, he also served as a dean of the Howard University School of Law and as the

Outside Agitator: The Civil Rights Struggle of Cleveland Sellers Jr.

In 1968 state troopers gunned down black students protesting the segregation of a South Carolina bowling alley, killing three and injuring 28. The Orangeburg Massacre was one of the most violent moments of the Southern civil rights movement, and only one person served prison time in its aftermath: a young black man by the name of Cleveland Sellers Jr. Many years later, the state would recognize that Sellers was a scapegoat in that college campus tragedy and would issue a full pardon. Outside

My Tour Through the Asylum: a Southern Intergationist's Memoir

(Originally broadcast 04/06/18) - Immortalized in the writings of his most famous student, best-selling author Pat Conroy, veteran education administrator William E. Dufford has led an the life of a stalwart champion for social justice and equal access for all to the empowerment of a good public education. In My Tour Through the Asylum: A Southern Integrationist's Memoir (USC Press, 2017), Dufford and his collaborators, Aïda Rogers and Salley McInerney, recount the possibilities that unfold when

The Last Ballad: Life in the Mill and Death on the Picket Line

New York Times bestselling author Wiley Cash's 2017 novel, The Last Ballad (2017, Willamm Morrow) is set in the Appalachian foothills of North Carolina in 1929 and inspired by actual events. It chronicles an ordinary woman's struggle for dignity and her rights in a textile mill; The Last Ballad is a moving tale of courage in the face of oppression and injustice. It is based on true events and tells the story of Ella Mae Wiggins, whose ballads about the poverty of mill workers in the South, and

Pat Conroy: My Exaggerated Life

Pat Conroy's memoirs and autobiographical novels contain a great deal about his life, but there is much he hasn't revealed with readers until now. My Exaggerated Life (2018, University of South Carolina Press) is the product of a special collaboration between this great American author and oral biographer Katherine Clark, who recorded two hundred hours of conversations with Conroy before he passed away in 2016. In the spring and summer of 2014, the two spoke for an hour or more on the phone

Forgotten Jazz Great: Charleston's Fud Livingston

Charleston's Fud Livingston, 'Jazz Age' arranger, composer, and musician, made memorable music. (Originally broadcast 05/18/18) - Joseph Anthony "Fud" Livingston, born in Charleston, SC, in 1906, was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, arranger, and composer who played with some of the most renowned musicians of the Jazz Age, including Bix Beiderbecke, Red Nichols, Joe Venuti, Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and the Dorsey brothers, Tommy and Jimmy. He arranged for Broadway and wrote songs,

The Most Influential 20th-Century Southern Novel?

This month, a PBS series, The Great American Read , celebrates the joy of reading and the books we love. Celebrities, authors, and book lovers reveal the novels that have affected their lives. And, the national vote gets under way, to decide America's Best-Loved Novel. Back in 2009, SCETV's Take on the South took a similar poll, and asked the question, "What was the most influential 20th-Century Southern Novel?"

Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community

In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a small African American community still living on land obtained immediately after the Civil War. In his new book, Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community This intimate history tells the story of five generations of the

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