RadioWest A show for the wildly curious. Doug Fabrizio explores the world through in-depth conversations with writers, filmmakers, scientists, thinkers and others. From KUER in Salt Lake City. Listen to the podcast or tune in Fridays from 11 to 1 p.m.
RadioWest

RadioWest

From KUER 90.1

A show for the wildly curious. Doug Fabrizio explores the world through in-depth conversations with writers, filmmakers, scientists, thinkers and others. From KUER in Salt Lake City. Listen to the podcast or tune in Fridays from 11 to 1 p.m.

Most Recent Episodes

An American Indian Captive In The House of Brigham Young

In 1847, soon after Latter-Day Saints settled in Utah, a battered and bloody young Pavant Ute woman was traded to the family of Brigham Young for a rifle. Given the name Sally Kanosh, she lived the next 30 years as a servant in the household of the LDS leader.

Richard Thompson Ford On How The Laws Of Fashion Made History

In his new book, author Richard Thompson Ford examines the history of how we dress and how clothing affects individuals and society — for the good and the bad. For as long as we've clothed ourselves, what we wear has offered an immediate look into who we are and where we come from. But beyond what clothes say about us, how we choose to dress — and how we're told to dress — reveals just as much about who has the power in society. In the 18th century, if Black Americans dressed "above their

Dr. Bruce Greyson on Near Death Experiences

Stories of near-death experiences are not uncommon, but science generally dismisses them as tricks of the brain. But is dying really the end of consciousness?

McKay Coppins On The Vultures Ravaging America's Newspapers

Newspapers across America have been struggling for years. Some of that can be chalked up to failing to adjust to the digital age. But then there's the case of Alden Global Capital. It's a hedge fund, run by two men who, a new article by The Atlantic says, gutted newsrooms across the country in their pursuit of profit.

The State And Fate Of The Great Salt Lake, Part II

According to scientists who study it, the Great Salt Lake — the largest saltwater lake in the western hemisphere — is drying up.The lake has already reached the lowest water level in history, and its receding waters and growing shorelines could bring massive changes to its complex ecosystem.

Giulio Boccaletti On The History Of Water

In a new book, the climate scientist and writer Giulio Boccaletti makes the case that the history of human civilization is inextricably tied to one simple and yet powerful force: water.

More Than Green Jell-O: Utah's Food Traditions

We're talking about Utah foodways this week. Plenty of places have distinctive culinary traditions, but what are Utah's?

Eric Garcia on Autism: 'We're Not Broken'

The title of journalist Eric Garcia's book, We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation , says it all: People with autism don't need to be fixed.

'Sagebrush Empire' And The Battle Over Public Land

A war over public lands in the Western U.S. has been raging for decades. And the epicenter of that battle? According to journalist Jonathan Thompson, it's in southeastern Utah's San Juan County.

How Do We Talk About The Painful Legacy Of Native American Boarding Schools?

In August, The Salt Lake Tribune reported that the bodies of Paiute children are likely buried on the property of a former Indigenous boarding school in Panguitch, Utah. It's a difficult and painful subject to talk about, and some members of the Paiute tribe wish the story had never been told by the media in the first place.

How Do We Talk About The Painful Legacy Of Native American Boarding Schools?