Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio News happens while you sleep. Marketplace Morning Report gives you a head start, with three updates throughout the morning. Host David Brancaccio shares the latest on markets, money, jobs and innovation, providing the context you need to make the smartest decisions. And from London, host Anu Anand presents Marketplace Morning Report from BBC World Service to bring you up to speed as the global economy shifts. It's the world perspective you need, from two trusted sources. Marketplace Morning Report is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace, Marketplace Weekend, and Marketplace Tech. Listen every weekday morning on-air or online anytime at marketplace.org. From American Public Media. Twitter: @marketplace

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

From American Public Media

News happens while you sleep. Marketplace Morning Report gives you a head start, with three updates throughout the morning. Host David Brancaccio shares the latest on markets, money, jobs and innovation, providing the context you need to make the smartest decisions. And from London, host Anu Anand presents Marketplace Morning Report from BBC World Service to bring you up to speed as the global economy shifts. It's the world perspective you need, from two trusted sources. Marketplace Morning Report is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace, Marketplace Weekend, and Marketplace Tech. Listen every weekday morning on-air or online anytime at marketplace.org. From American Public Media. Twitter: @marketplaceMore from Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio »

Most Recent Episodes

11/20/2017: The ex-Obama official who wants to reform The Weinstein Co.

(Markets Edition) On today's show, we'll take a peek at what leading indicators have to say about our economy. Turns out it's looking much better because our major trading partners are on a roll. Afterwards, we'll look at news that a former Obama official — Maria Contreras-Sweet — is making a $275 million bid for The Weinstein Co., with plans to reform it by installing a female-majority board. And finally, we'll discuss what the GOP's planned tax overhaul would mean for independent contractors.

11/20/2017: The ex-Obama official who wants to reform The Weinstein Co.

11/20/2017: What constitutes sexual harassment at work?

(U.S. Edition) In Germany, talks aimed at forming a ruling coalition fell apart last night. Chancellor Angela Merkel won the most votes in a general election in September, but not enough to rule outright. On today's show, we'll take a look at the current state of Germany's economy and what political instability could mean for it. Afterwards, we'll look at Toshiba's financial woes: it faces $6 billion in liabilities because its U.S. subsidiary Westinghouse is in bankruptcy. Then, we'll talk to Gillian Thomas, senior staff attorney with the Women's Rights Project at the ACLU, about what companies need to do to stop sexual harassment.

11/20/2017: German coalition talks fail

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... German Chancellor Angela Merkel is back to square one after a potential partner walked out of negotiations to try and form a coalition government. We find out what the political uncertainty means for Europe's largest economy. Afterwards, the Japanese corporate giant Toshiba's shares fell nearly 5 percent on news it's trying to raise more than $5 billion through a massive new stock listing. Then, we hear how Cuba's recent boom in tourism could be reversing as diplomatic relations with the United States become icy again.

11/17/2017: Economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin on the benefit of corporate tax cuts

(Markets Edition) With Republicans racing to approve legislation that would overhaul America's tax system, we'll hear from Diane Swonk — CEO of DS Economics — about the math behind the plan. These tax cuts could end up adding to the deficit, which Swonk says will create "liabilities" for future generations. Afterwards, we'll chat with Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a prominent economist and the policy director for John McCain when he ran for president in '08, about why he thinks cutting the corporate tax rate could help increase wages. And finally, we'll look at why more Americans are expected to travel this Thanksgiving than in previous years.

11/17/2017: Economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin on the benefit of corporate tax cuts

11/17/2017: Economist Jeffrey Sachs says the GOP tax plan is "a heist"

(U.S. Edition) The Republican tax overhaul — which calls for a reduced corporate tax rate of 20 percent — has now passed in the House. There's been a lot of debate over how much this bill will help American taxpayers. One noted economist who argues that it won't: Jeffrey Sachs, who joined our show today. Sachs, a Columbia University professor who helped engineer the Soviet Union's transition to a market economy, said "we're talking about gifts to David and Charles Koch, to Sheldon Adelson, to Robert Mercer. This is not reform. This is a heist." Afterwards, we'll look at reports that President Trump may appoint Budget Director Mick Mulvaney as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. What would this mean for the future of the agency?

11/17/2017: Economist Jeffrey Sachs says the GOP tax plan is "a heist"

11/16/2017: A change of leadership for Zimbabwe

(Markets Edition) Amid Walmart's announcement that quarterly earnings exceeded expectations, we'll take a look at how the retail giant has been trying to find that sweet spot between saving shoppers money and making enough money for itself. Afterwards, we'll talk to the Washington Post's Helaine Olen about what America's proposed tax overhaul could mean for our personal finances. Then, we'll focus on Zimbabwe to learn more about the house arrest of 93-year-old Robert Mugabe, the country's president of 37 years.

11/16/2017: What tax reform means for Trump's personal finances

(U.S. Edition) With the House GOP set to vote today on its plan for American taxes, we'll chat with someone who's been through a big tax overhaul before: Gene Steuerle, who heads the non-partisan Tax Policy Center. He joined us to talk about the basic principles most people can agree with when it comes to tax reform. Afterwards, we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about how Congress' tax plans might affect none other than President Donald Trump.

11/16/2017: Stark warning for China's financial system

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are some fresh warnings today about serious risks facing China's economy. A senior government official told a conference in Beijing the country's financial sector needs quick reform to avoid crisis. Afterwards, a new study says many of the effects of climate change are inevitable, even if the world radically cuts carbon dioxide emissions now. Then, we hear from a French winemaker about the hype and history of Beaujolais Nouveau Day.

11/15/2017: The aftermath of Mexico's devastating earthquakes

(Markets Edition) Senate Republicans are looking to repeal Obamacare's mandate that people have to sign up for health insurance. We'll look at how much money they could stand to save by slashing it, and whether healthier people will still buy insurance. Afterwards, we'll chat with Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager for Westwood Holdings Group, about why there's been a back-to-back decline in stocks. Then to cap off today's show, we'll discuss how Mexico has been coping after two devastating earthquakes in September.

11/15/2017: The tax cut that's turning into an Obamacare cut

(U.S. Edition) Republicans are looking for ways to pay for the tax cuts they're proposing. One of them: repealing the Obamacare mandate that individuals have to buy insurance. We'll do the math on how that would work. Afterwards, we'll discuss how medium-sized banks are downsizing to escape the Federal Reserve as one of their regulators, and then talk with art critic Blake Gopnik about a Leonardo da Vinci painting that could sell for more than $100 million tonight.

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