Marketplace Morning Report In less than 10 minutes, we'll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace's David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you'll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London.
Marketplace Morning Report

Marketplace Morning Report

From Marketplace

In less than 10 minutes, we'll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace's David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you'll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London.

Most Recent Episodes

The debate over vaccine intellectual property rights is heating up

A new COVID-19 variant is emerging as President Biden faces growing pressure to push for an emergency intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 vaccines. In a letter to Biden, 15 human rights and medical groups called the waiver "a moral imperative" that would help get more doses of the vaccine to low-income countries. We also look at what Small Business Saturday means for local retailers this year, and how supply chain shortages might actually work in their favor. Plus: how a South African mall is navigating the return to in-person shopping, and why some Americans are opting out of the consumer frenzy — and not just for the holidays.

Understanding the wage-price inflation cycle

The global semiconductor shortage could continue until the second half of next year, according to a projection from chip supplier Foxconn — which could mean higher prices for goods like cars. And people's expectations that prices will go up can lead them to ask for higher wages to afford said goods. Businesses then raise prices to compensate, leading to a continuing cycle of inflation. Are we in danger of entering that cycle? Plus, we look at what the new COVID-19 variant means for markets and the holiday travel season.

A new strain of COVID-19 sparks a selloff in global markets

From the BBC World Service: As countries including the U.K., Germany and Japan announce restrictions on flights from a number of southern African countries, the WHO now needs to decide if this should be labelled a variant of concern. But, the selloff in markets, coming the day after Thanksgiving, needs a bit more context. And, we hear from global supermarket giant Carrefour on what super-fast delivery adds to its bottom line.

High gas prices could have staying power during the holidays

President Biden released 50 million barrels of oil from the strategic reserve, but experts warn not to expect that to knock gas prices down during the holidays. We look into how the kinks in the supply chain could open up opportunities for gift cards. The BBC hits the streets of London to see how it does Thanksgiving.

USDA turns an eye toward Indigenous partnerships, food security

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently announced partnerships with tribal leaders and food producers in an effort to promote Indigenous food sovereignty. As the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade returns in full force, we look into the company's announcement to cover tuition for its employees. Other companies have made the same pledges, but do those programs work? The BBC reports on a fresh wave of COVID cases that has hit Germany, right as the new incoming government begins to take over.

New German government, same old problems?

From the BBC World Service: With COVID-19 infection rates across Europe, Germany's incoming coalition government has to deal with pandemic challenges as well as supply-chain kinks and fresh data showing slower economic growth than expected. And, it's harder than usual for Americans abroad to find some of their favorite Thanksgiving food.

The typewriter as a turning point for working women

When the first commercial typewriters were introduced in 1874, offices were men's domain. But soon the majority of clerical workers were women, and that remains true today — and the typewriter is a crucial part of that revolution. We also look at President Biden's nomination of Shalanda Young to head the Office of Management and Budget, who would be the first Black woman in the role permanently. Plus, what do today's economic indicators tell us about the holiday shopping season?

A historic verdict in the opioid crisis

For the first time, a jury has found major pharmacy chains liable for the opioid addiction crisis. Two Ohio counties sued CVS, Walgreens and Walmart over the epidemic of addictions that's claimed half a million lives in this country. Plus, two days before Black Friday, we take a moment to consider the junk we can't seem to get rid of.

Turkey's currency crisis is deepening by the day

From the BBC World Service: After plunging 15% on Monday, the lira has recovered some of its early losses. But there are reports supermarkets are beginning to ration flour and sugar and prices for goods and services are rising. Plus, Germany's incoming government is set to unveil its coalition deal, giving an idea of the direction for Europe's largest economy. And, how so-called 'scambaiters' are trying to get revenge against scammers.

Add Christmas trees to the list of shortages

However, the reason for the dip in Christmas tree supply has to do with climate change. A dome of heat earlier in the covered the Pacific Northwest, wreaking havoc on tree farms and putting a dent in the overall inventory of trees that would have been on the market. Inflation has eaten into the increased benefits for SNAP recipients. We discuss the markets with Gus Faucher of PNC Financial Services Group.