Marketplace Morning Report In less than 10 minutes, we'll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace's David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you'll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London.
Marketplace Morning Report

Marketplace Morning Report

From Marketplace

In less than 10 minutes, we'll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace's David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you'll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London.

Most Recent Episodes

Why the unemployment gap for Black and white workers persists

The unemployment gap between Black and white workers has consistently been around 2 to 1 ever since the government started disaggregating the data more than five decades ago. While the Black unemployment rate is relatively low historically, the gap remains. We'll discuss the institutional reasons why and how best to tackle the issue. Also on today's program: the return of standardized testing and a preview of Senate hearings centered on Boeing's manufacturing and safety practices.

Workers are getting a smaller slice of the pie

Next month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics will tell us how much of the income generated by workers' toil actually went to them in Q1. That stat is called labor share of national income — and it's shrinking. Plus, a government committee that scrutinizes deals between foreign companies and American firms may be getting more power. And 14 states are opting out of a summer EBT program that would help families buy groceries. Wanna learn more about labor share of income and see Marketplace reporter Nancy Marshall Genzer get a pie in the face? Check out the Marketplace TikTok feed.

Chinese victims of a bitcoin scam believe the U.K. government has their money

From the BBC World Service: Thousands of victims of a huge investment scam believe police in London have nearly $4 billion worth of bitcoin that belongs to them and want the British government to give it back. Then, The European Central bank held interest rates steady but gave strong hints about future rate cuts. Plus, we hear about padel, one of the world's fastest growing sports, and its Olympic ambitions

Chinese victims of a bitcoin scam believe the U.K. government has their money

Unpacking the extent of this year’s FAFSA mess

On Wednesday, Republicans, Democrats and college officials took to Capitol Hill to vent about the Education Department’s botched rollout of a newer, simplified FAFSA form. That’s the form high school students fill out and send to colleges to determine financial aid offers — and it’s affected millions of students. We’ll also discuss fresh wholesale inflation figures and get a sneak peak at the latest season of Marketplace’s “Million Bazillion” podcast, which tackles kids’ biggest money questions.

Unpacking the extent of this year’s FAFSA mess

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Unpacking the extent of this year's FAFSA mess

On Wednesday, Republicans, Democrats and college officials took to Capitol Hill to vent about the Education Department's botched rollout of a newer, simplified FAFSA form. That's the form high school students fill out and send to colleges to determine financial aid offers — and it's affected millions of students. We'll also discuss fresh wholesale inflation figures and get a sneak peak at the latest season of Marketplace's "Million Bazillion" podcast, which tackles kids' biggest money questions.

Meta trials a new feature to protect teens

Meta's latest answer to protecting kids on Instagram is automatically blurring images that may contain nudity. The company says it will test this on the platform's direct messaging feature. We'll parse the details. Plus, the FCC is requiring large internet providers to post "broadband nutrition labels" that provide a snapshot of charges and performance data. Will they impact consumers' internet diet? And a recent survey finds that CEOs are feeling pretty optimistic.

A death sentence for one of the biggest bank frauds in history

From the BBC World Service: A Vietnamese court sentenced property developer Truong My Lan to death after she was convicted of taking $44 billion from one of Vietnam's largest banks. Also, South Korea's liberal opposition party won in a landslide majority in the country's general election. And paralympian Stef Reid is asking sportswear companies who use amputee athletes in their marketing why it's not possible to buy single shoes.

Interest rates are not coming down any time soon

That's the conclusion of many investors this morning, following the release of the consumer price index. Consumer inflation clocked in at 3.5% annually, while central bankers are looking for a figure closer to 2%. We'll talk through the data. Plus, a European court ruled that two Russian oligarchs were wrongly sanctioned following Russia'a invasion of Ukraine. And the Congressional Budget Office found that immigration means gains for U.S. economy.

I mean, it's one home. What could it cost? A million dollars?

The value of a typical home has reached $1 million or more in 550 U.S. cities, according to Zillow. That's a record high, and those not-so-affordable homes are proliferating well beyond the usual high-cost metro areas like New York, San Francisco and LA. Also on the program: what to expect from today's consumer price index report and how a cocktail with roots in wartime propaganda manages to stay relevant.

South Korea goes to the polls

From the BBC World Service: Rising food prices, strikes and paying for an aging population were familiar themes as South Koreans voted today. Then, Spain has become the latest country to scrap so-called "golden visas," where foreign nationals are granted residency rights in exchange for investments. And later, we hear about the aviation industry's race against time to produce enough sustainable aviation fuel to meet the industry's growing demands.