Marketplace Every weekday, host Kai Ryssdal helps you make sense of the day's business and economic news — no econ degree or finance background required. "Marketplace" takes you beyond the numbers, bringing you context. Our team of reporters all over the world speak with CEOs, policymakers and regular people just trying to get by.
Marketplace

Marketplace

From Marketplace

Every weekday, host Kai Ryssdal helps you make sense of the day's business and economic news — no econ degree or finance background required. "Marketplace" takes you beyond the numbers, bringing you context. Our team of reporters all over the world speak with CEOs, policymakers and regular people just trying to get by.

Most Recent Episodes

Do modern-day starter homes exist?

The U.S. saw a boom in "entry level" homes for young couples post-World War II. Today's housing market, and first-time homeownership, may be unrecognizable from the vantage point of the 1950s. In this episode, a look at the origins of starter homes and how sales agents are reframing the homebuying timeline. Plus, Macy's announces a major pivot, CEO turnover cranks up and durable goods orders reveal where businesses stand on expansion.

Credit card fee feud

Every time you swipe — or, these days, tap — your credit card, the merchant has to pay a fee. Some fed-up retailers are petitioning for more card fee regulation, but banks say consumers have plenty of choice as it is. Also in this episode: consumers' moods versus economic data and pandemic purchases that buyers regret.

A not-so-happy anniversary to Silicon Valley Bank

The failures of Silicon Valley Bank and several other institutions rank among the largest bank collapses in U.S. history. Almost a year later, small banks still face aftershocks. Also in this episode, traditional sports journalism is disappearing. Will accountability in the sports industry follow? And one couple finds financial freedom with an unusual real estate purchase.

Biden hopes sustainable aviation fuel production could take flight soon

Sustainable aviation fuel — an alternative to conventional petroleum — aims to decarbonize a carbon-heavy sector. Right now, it accounts for less than 1% of global jet fuel. Biden's Inflation Reduction Act incentivizes aviation's transition to SAF, but manufacturers still face big roadblocks. Plus, not all SAFs are created equal. This episode is part of our series "Breaking Ground," where we look at how federal infrastructure spending might change the economy.

Neel Kashkari and the Fed's inflation fears

Overall, inflation has plummeted since June 2022, shortly after the Federal Reserve began hiking interest rates, and the Fed is getting closer to its 2% target. But consumer prices are still high. So why is it taking so long for the Fed to cut interest rates? "The Federal Reserve has been faked out before, where we thought inflation was licked, and then it flared back up again," Neel Kashkari, president of the Minneapolis Fed, told us on today's show. "That's what we want to avoid." Also: What to expect when Amazon replaces Walgreens on the Dow, how congressional budget fights threaten federal firefighters' pay, and why the U.S. is selling its helium reserve.

What’s in your wallet?

If a $35 billion deal goes through, Capital One will purchase Discover and become the nation’s largest credit card issuer. But the bank isn’t in it for credit debt — it’s in it for Discover’s payments system. Also in this episode: why Walmart had strong sales last quarter and how states are preparing for a potentially contentious Election Day. Also, is the post-lockdown travel boom still on?

What’s in your wallet?

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What's in your wallet?

If a $35 billion deal goes through, Capital One will purchase Discover and become the nation's largest credit card issuer. But the bank isn't in it for credit debt — it's in it for Discover's payments system. Also in this episode: why Walmart had strong sales last quarter and how states are preparing for a potentially contentious Election Day. Also, is the post-lockdown travel boom still on?

Can we break out of the mortgage lock-in effect?

It's a tough time to be a first-time buyer in the housing market. But it's also tricky if you own a home and are looking to buy a new one, because your mortgage rate could roughly double. That "lock-in effect" is keeping housing inventory low and pushing prices higher. Then, we'll examine why shipping costs are falling despite global disruptions and hear how steakhouses are trying to rebrand themselves.

Vacant office buildings are making city budgets vulnerable

Vacant offices have been tough on the commercial real estate industry, and more recently lenders that have built a big business on those property loans. But the biggest losers are cities that depend on commercial property taxes. In this episode, some municipalities face big revenue shortfalls. Also: another blow to ESG investing, the cost of big-name credit cards and our excess stuff is feeding the booming storage space industry.

Why so many layoffs in a hot labor market?

Cisco, the communications infrastructure giant, is planning to cut lots of jobs. It's the latest high-profile company to do so. Meanwhile, we keep getting positive indicators about the labor market, like today's data on falling jobless claims. We'll explain the disconnect on today's show. Also: What rising import prices mean, tracking shipments on freight trains and why a bank created to integrate emancipated Black Americans into the economy matters today.