Marketplace Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our flagship program is all about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy numbers, we help listeners understand the economic world around them.
Marketplace

Marketplace

From American Public Media

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our flagship program is all about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy numbers, we help listeners understand the economic world around them.

Most Recent Episodes

How much can one school provide?

How much can one school provide?

For years, Oyler School has been trying to provide for students' basic needs in one of Cincinnati's poorest neighborhoods. Now, leaders are looking outside the school and trying to improve the local job market. Plus: The International Monetary Fund projects an economy without the U.S.-China trade war, and Walmart's new direct-to-fridge delivery service.

How much can a school remake the neighborhood it's in?

How much can a school remake the neighborhood it's in?

Cincinnati's Oyler School serves one of the city's poorest neighborhoods. Community leaders have used public and private money to add a food pantry, health clinics and more so students could focus on learning. Graduation rates have been steadily ticking up, but in recent years, the school's been trying to help more homeless students find a place to stay. Administrators are realizing that transforming a school may not be enough to spark the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood. Plus: China's latest import and export numbers, and why some key players are pulling out of Facebook's cryptocurrency efforts.

The nest is full

According to Census Bureau data, about 37% of Californians age 18 to 34 still live with a parent. In more expensive parts of the state, that number is much higher. Today, we look at the factors making living at home the new normal for some young adults. Plus: new consumer sentiment numbers and the first state law cracking down on forced arbitration.

What it's like to be a foster parent during the opioid crisis

We talked a bit yesterday about West Virginia, which has the highest rate of children in foster care in the nation, thanks largely to the opioid crisis. Today, we're continuing that story by looking at some of the challenges facing foster parents there. Plus: The impact California's power outages are having on low-income households, and why negotiating a salary is so hard.

In West Virginia, the opioid crisis is straining the foster care system

In West Virginia, the opioid crisis is straining the foster care system

As many American parents struggle with opioid addiction, the number of children put into foster care in the U.S. is steadily increasing. West Virginia has been hit particularly hard: 70% more children entered foster care there in six years, and most of them have a parent struggling with substance use. Today, we'll take you inside a system that's straining to care for them all. But first: The latest from the Fed, and the controversy in the NBA over Chinese protestors.

What's your data worth?

What's your data worth?

If a service is free, the saying goes, then you're the product. Most of us have come to accept that when you're using social media or a free email client, you're giving up some data in exchange. But what if you got paid for giving up some of that information? Today, we talk with a startup that's working on it. Plus: Target is joining forces with a resurrected Toys R Us, and California is fighting wildfires by turning the lights off.

Remember pensions?

Remember pensions?

General Electric will freeze pensions for 20,000 workers and offer pension buyouts to another 100,000 former employees. Today, we trace the decline of the once-common benefit. But first: We check in on the state of the trade war and the autoworkers' strike. Plus, a conversation with the CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods.

There's no such thing as a free oyster

... usually they're a dollar, but you get the idea. Today: the economics of happy hour, particularly discounted seafood. But first, let's take apart that new jobs report.

What we talk about when we talk about jobs

We talk about the federal government's jobs report every month. But determining how many Americans are unemployed, how many jobs the economy created and in which sectors is a tricky business. Ahead of tomorrow's new numbers, we'll dig into how it all works. Plus: A story from communist China, which turns 70 this week. And who pays to fix federal monuments?

Maybe it's not a recession after all

Maybe it's not a recession after all

Economists and market watchers have spent the past few months trying to figure out if we're headed toward, or maybe already in, a recession. But there's a growing chorus wondering if the U.S. economy is just headed toward a period of slow growth. Today, we dig into what that means. Plus: How Amazon handles counterfeit goods and how couples handle money.

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