Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. Host Kai Ryssdal and our team of reporters bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Airing each weekday evening on your local public radio station or on-demand anytime, Marketplace is your liaison between economics and life. Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace Morning Report®, Marketplace Weekend®, and Marketplace Tech®. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Public Media. Twitter: @Marketplace
Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

From American Public Media

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. Host Kai Ryssdal and our team of reporters bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Airing each weekday evening on your local public radio station or on-demand anytime, Marketplace is your liaison between economics and life. Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which additionally includes Marketplace Morning Report®, Marketplace Weekend®, and Marketplace Tech®. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Public Media. Twitter: @MarketplaceMore from Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal »

Most Recent Episodes

Tariffs, but make it fashion

The Trump administration will impose tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese products next week as President Donald Trump first threatened in June. Hundreds of people have testified and submitted written comments about their impact, including Julia Hughes, president of the United States Fashion Industry Association. We'll chat with her, as well as Canadian aluminum producers stinging from the trade war. Plus: A conversation with Tender Greens CEO Denyelle Bruno.

The day the bank fell

When Lynn Gray went home on Friday, Sept. 12, 2008, she was expecting that her employer, Lehman Brothers, would be purchased over the weekend. Barclay's and Bank of America were both considering saving it from bankruptcy. Things changed quickly. Gray's on the show today to tell us what it was like being in the building when Lehman fell and helped set off a worldwide crisis. Plus, a forensic accountant was a key witness in the trial of Paul Manafort. But what, exactly, is forensic accounting? We'll explain. But first, we talk about the past seven days of financial news in the Weekly Wrap.

"We function very well in chaos"

President Donald Trump rejected the government's assessment of the death toll from Hurricane Maria this morning. "3,000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico," he tweeted, accusing Democrats of inflating the number. Those statements are not grounded in fact. What is a fact is that the island was devastated, and thousands did die because of a lack of electricity, shelter, food and water. With that in mind, we talked with chef José Andrés today about his experience feeding thousands of Puerto Ricans in the storm's wake. But first: Between wildfires and the approach of Hurricane Florence, many Americans are expected to rebuild damaged homes. But demand for building materials, alongside tariffs on wood and steel, could drive costs up. We'll look at what happens when trade wars and disaster recovery collide. Plus, can the Apple Watch disrupt Life Alert?

The software that changed the economy

You probably haven't heard of Michael Osinski. He's an oyster farmer in upstate New York. But before he did that, in the '80s, he wrote the software that helped banks securitize mortgages — software that would contribute to Lehman's collapse and to the financial crisis at large. We'll bring you his story today, but first a look at e-cigarettes. The FDA is giving manufacturers like Juul 60 days to come up with a game plan addressing teen vaping, threatening to pull products if they don't comply. Then: the sociology of white privilege.

How banks got "too big to fail"

The phrase "too big to fail" is closely associated with the financial crisis of a decade ago, and it was used as a justification for government bailouts. It wasn't always this way. There was a time when most banks were small, and they liked it that way. Today, just six banks manage more than half the assets in the entire U.S. banking industry. We'll trace how it happened, and talk to the owner of a very different "Lehman" business about what it was like living through 2008. Plus, we'll answer more listener questions about trade and take a look at just how well FEMA's prepared for hurricane season.

The most dramatic bankruptcy in history ...

... It's one that continues to this day. The massive investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed 10 years ago this week, helping to set off the global financial crisis. A lot of you know that story, but what you might not know is that Lehman is still around today. We'll take some time today to look at its legacy and talk with three of the men tasked with trying to contain the damage: Hank Paulson, Tim Geithner and Ben Bernanke. But first: CBS CEO Les Moonves resigned this week amid another wave of sexual harassment allegations. The company said it will donate $20 million from Moonves' severance package to the #MeToo movement, but what's that actually mean? Plus, how the trade war is affecting big auto companies' plans.

Bernanke, Geithner and Paulson (encore)

Lehman Brothers collapsed ten years ago this week. We'll talk more about it on Marketplace later today, but now we're bringing your our full interview with Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke, and New York Fed President Tim Geithner, who later served as Treasury Secretary. This spring, they talked with Kai about Lehman weekend, and the race to respond to the financial crisis. This interview is part of Marketplace's coverage of the ten-year anniversary of the financial crisis called Divided Decade, a year-long project exploring what happened, why it matters now and how the aftermath will continue to have an impact on Americans' economic future.

Hello? Is it sheets you're looking for?

Today's jobs day, but this time we're more interested in wages: the Labor Department said pay is rising faster than it has since 2009. We'll look at what's (finally) driving that change and how long it can last. Then: Amid all the trade talk, let's not forget about one of Finland's biggest exports: heavy metal. The Scandinavian nation boasts more than 50 metal bands for every 100,000 citizens, more than any other country. We'll take a look at why. Plus: Why J.C. Penney is getting in the bedding business with Lionel Richie.

How the government took over Fannie and Freddie

A decade ago this week, the government agreed to take over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to help stabilize the housing market. We'll take a look back at how it all happened and interview Freddie's CEO. But first: Wage growth is sluggish by most measures, but a new report from the White House says those figures don't tell the whole story. Plus: What have we learned a year after the Equifax data breach?

Nobody likes thinking about a financial crisis

We continue our conversation with Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari, and instead of looking back at the financial crisis 10 years ago, we look forward to potential economic what-if scenarios. Kashkari thinks uncertainty in emerging markets could spark a new crisis, so we'll take a closer look at the plunge of currencies abroad. Also, a look back to FEMA's response to Hurricane Maria. According to a new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, FEMA wasn't ready to handle the disaster. We talk about why that was the case. Plus, how much do you spend in a week? We sat down with Refinery29's Work & Money Editor Lindsey Stanberry about the website's Money Diaries series.

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