Marketplace Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn't just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what's happening in the stock market and how macroeconomic policy can affect you and your business. Monday through Friday, our team speaks with a wide range of industry professionals– from small business owners to Fortune 500 CEOs, Marketplace breaks down complex topics related to business and the economy without industry jargon and over complicated explanations.
Marketplace

Marketplace

From American Public Media

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn't just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what's happening in the stock market and how macroeconomic policy can affect you and your business. Monday through Friday, our team speaks with a wide range of industry professionals– from small business owners to Fortune 500 CEOs, Marketplace breaks down complex topics related to business and the economy without industry jargon and over complicated explanations.

Most Recent Episodes

What it's like to run a microbusiness in the pandemic economy

Microbusinesses, defined as having nine or fewer employees, are the most common kind of employer in the U.S. But they might have a hard time getting the financial aid meant for small businesses during the coronavirus pandemic. On today's show: a microbusiness owner shares what it's been like this past year. Plus: Some manufacturers are having difficulty filling jobs despite high unemployment; food commodities are at their most expensive since 2014; and what it's like to look for work during a pandemic.

The jobs recovery might be running out of gas

The jobs recovery might be running out of gas

We got private-sector payroll numbers from the processing firm ADP today showing 170,000 new jobs — well below expectations and another indicator that this recovery may be sputtering. Which is, of course, why Congress is working on the next COVID-19 relief bill at this very moment. On today's show: a look at the pandemic labor market. Plus, Texas is reopening, a check-in with people rebuilding after a deadly Tennessee tornado and why people are spending big bucks on "nonfungible tokens."

A seat at the table for workers

A seat at the table for workers

The Biden administration released its trade policy agenda today, and it's hefty, with goals including the advancement of racial equity, fighting against climate change and taking on what it calls China's "coercive and unfair economic trade practices." At the center of it all, though? A more worker-centric approach to trade. On today's show: What does it mean for workers to have a seat at the table when it comes to trade policy? Plus, schools need funding to reopen safely, and which GameStop movie will be the first to hit screens?

The pandemic is affecting states unequally, too

The pandemic is affecting states unequally, too

The story of the coronavirus economy has been one of inequality — for people, businesses and even states. Many state governments have been taking in less tax revenue ever since the pandemic closed businesses and schools, and millions lost their jobs. But in 22 states, tax revenue has actually increased during the pandemic. On today's show: How high-income taxpayers are helping some states make it through the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Texas' largest electricity co-op is filing for bankruptcy, and rental relief is taking a while to get to those who need it.

A return to the service economy?

A return to the service economy?

Stuck at home during the pandemic and unable to spend on restaurants or travel, Americans have been trying fulfill emotional needs by buying stuff. But you can only buy so many backyard trampolines, and economists are predicting a big shift back to spending on services as COVID-19 cases decline. That's good news for the United States' service economy. Also on today's show: Some credit card limits are going up and a look at challenges health care disruptors face.

Ready to release some pent-up demand

Ready to release some pent-up demand

The unemployment rate is still high at 10%, and the economic recovery from COVID-19 is going to take a while. But as coronavirus cases begin to trend downward and vaccine distribution continues, people are getting ready for things to open up. On today' show: Some economists think there will be a whole lot of pent-up demand let loose as things start to look up. Plus, New York's plans for reopening, the challenges in winterizing Texas' power grid and an update on how pandemic learning pods are working nearly one year into the pandemic.

The future of this country's competitive edge

The future of this country's competitive edge

President Joe Biden signed an executive order today designed to make U.S. supply chains more resilient and secure. The pandemic exposed problems with the current system, including shortages of personal protective equipment and semiconductors. But the order is about more than face masks and electronics; it's about the future of U.S. competitiveness. Also on today's show: what it might take to get back to full employment, the child tax credit proposal explained and a conversation with actor-director Regina King about her directorial debut.

How new PPP eligibility requirements are hurting some small businesses

How new PPP eligibility requirements are hurting some small businesses

The second round of the Paycheck Protection Program started about a month ago. It's supposed to help small businesses survive the COVID-19 pandemic, but this round has stricter eligibility requirements, including that businesses can only apply if revenue dropped by at least 25%. On today's show: Those restrictions are barring some small businesses that could really use the support. Plus, what the bond market is signaling about recovery, an update on the vaccine supply chain and how small businesses in Texas are dealing with the winter storm fallout.

How making federal jobless benefits automatic would work

How making federal jobless benefits automatic would work

Lawmakers are taking up President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan this week, and this third round of support is expected to face hurdles. But what if additional federal unemployment benefits didn't need congressional approval? On today's show: Some policymakers want to make benefits an "automatic stabilizer," meaning they would be tied to economic data, similar to how your tax rate is tied to your income. Plus, the impact of a $15 hourly minimum wage, mortgage rates creep up with talk of inflation and how your fitness tracker could detect COVID-19 before a test.

Where did hazard pay go?

Where did hazard pay go?

At the beginning of the pandemic, essential workers like those in grocery and retail stores were receiving hazard pay for toiling under hazardous conditions, aka the pandemic. Since then, for many workers, it has quietly disappeared. Today, we'll look at how efforts to grant or replace hazard pay have been going. Plus: inflation in energy, shelter and food, Chinese students are reconsidering coming to the U.S. for college and Joe Biden makes his first international appearance as U.S. president at the G-7 summit.

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