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WUWM News

WUWM News

From WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee's NPR

Milwaukee's NPR station. Daily news stories from WUWM - Milwaukee Public Radio.

Most Recent Episodes

Hip-Hop Teaches Milwaukee Kids That Black History Isn't Just In The Past

As part of Black History Month, kids in Milwaukee are learning about the history of hip-hop and how they can still be involved in the culture if they want. A group of high school kids met inside Villard Square public library on Milwaukee's north side earlier this week. Fidel Verdin handed out papers and pencils so they could take notes. The kids have their heads down, they're a little quiet, but they're engaged as Verdin gives a presentation on the history of hip-hop — a form of music and dance

Hip-Hop Teaches Milwaukee Kids That Black History Isn't Just In The Past

Flu Kills Another Child In Wisconsin; Problem With Coronavirus Test Kits

Wisconsin health officials say a second child has died from the flu this winter, and there's been a big rise this week in flu-related hospitalizations. The Department of Health Services says it also still regards the coronavirus as a very serious matter despite no new additional cases of that reported in Wisconsin. Also, officials say the coronavirus diagnostic test kits the state received from the Centers for Disease Control are flawed. Flu in Wisconsin State officials won't say much about the

Flu Kills Another Child In Wisconsin; Problem With Coronavirus Test Kits

Posting On Social Media About The Elections? Milwaukee Data Scientists Are Keeping Count

If you post about this year's elections on a blog or on social media like Facebook, you may wind up being a tiny part of new Milwaukee-based study. Researchers at UWM and Marquette University hope to use data science to learn more about voter priorities. Political polls, usually done by telephone, already tell us some things about potential voters. But UW-Milwaukee marketing professor Purush Papatla says polls have shortcomings. "Polling can only done at certain times. And, polling takes time to

Posting On Social Media About The Elections? Milwaukee Data Scientists Are Keeping Count

What Lies Ahead For The Future Milwaukee County Executive

The spring primary election is on Feb. 18. One of the biggest races on the ballot is for Milwaukee County executive. Chris Abele announced last October that he's not seeking reelection after holding the post since 2011. There are four candidates vying for the position: local businesswoman Purnima Nath , County Board Chairman Theodore Lipscomb , state Sen. Chris Larson , and state Rep. David Crowley . Rob Henken, president of the Wisconsin Policy Forum , says the most pressing responsibility for

Wisconsin Assembly Passes Bill That Would Punish Protesters Who Disrupt Campus Speeches

Students who disrupt campus speeches and presentations would be punished under a bill the Wisconsin Assembly passed on Tuesday. It now goes to the state Senate. Under the measure, students who disrupt speeches on UW System and technical college campuses twice would be suspended. Third-time offenders would be expelled. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle debated the bill passionately and it passed 62-37. Republicans say it's designed to avoid incidents that have occurred across the country, like

Wisconsin Assembly Passes Bill That Would Punish Protesters Who Disrupt Campus Speeches

Black Women Firsts: Wisconsin DPI Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor

In honor of Black History Month, we're highlighting several black women who are making history in their roles and industries here in Wisconsin. The series is called Black Women Firsts. In the first installment, we hear from Carolyn Stanford Taylor, the first black woman to lead Wisconsin's Department of Public Instruction. She was appointed by Gov. Tony Evers at the beginning of 2019, and previously served as assistant state superintendent. Stanford Taylor says she never intended to make history

Black Women Firsts: Wisconsin DPI Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor

'The Progress We've Made Is Impressive:' Mayor Barrett's 2020 State Of The City Address

Updated Thursday at 1:56 p.m. CT Milwaukee's mayoral primary election is a week away. Incumbent Tom Barrett delivered his State of the City address Monday morning, laying out his track record to a packed ballroom at the Potawatomi Hotel and Casino. The mayor's address mostly hailed the positive accomplishments of the city — starting with Milwaukee's successful bid to host the Democratic National Convention. "For the first time in the history of the state of Wisconsin, we are hosting a major

'The Progress We've Made Is Impressive:' Mayor Barrett's 2020 State Of The City Address

Who Pays When A Private Well In Wisconsin Is Contaminated?

An estimated 900,000 Wisconsin households rely on private wells for drinking water. It seems with every passing day, we learn wells are being impacted by contaminants — from manure to PFAS — putting families' health at risk. Some people feel there's not enough support when they have to deal with a contaminated well. READ: PFAS Concern Remains High In Marinette Private well owners John Ridley and his wife Terri have lived in their Mequon house for decades. They raised their kids there. While they

Wisconsin GOP Opens First Office In Milwaukee

The political parties are doing everything they can to court voters in swing-state Wisconsin, and this includes a GOP first: a campaign office in Milwaukee. The Wisconsin Republican Party ventured into Democratic territory Thursday, opening its first-ever campaign office near Milwaukee's central city. About 75 people attended the grand opening in the historic Bronzeville neighborhood. President Trump narrowly won Wisconsin in 2016, and the state is viewed as a battleground this year. Republican

Evers Wants Special Session On Education Funding And Tax Relief

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is trying again to increase state support of schools. This time, by calling a special session for Feb. 11 on the topic. But the proposal appears to be dead on arrival with Republican leadership. Evers wants to use $250 million of an expected budget surplus to restore the state's commitment to funding two-thirds of K-12 education costs. In January, lawmakers were notified that the state would collect about $800 million more in taxes than projected. Half of that will go

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