StudioTulsa Explore the arts with Public Radio Tulsa's Rich Fisher
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Lots of Tasty Nostalgia on the Menu in "Lost Restaurants of Tulsa"

Our guest on ST is the locally based photographer and writer, Rhys Martin, who joins us to discuss his new book: "Lost Restaurants of Tulsa." The book is just out, and it reveals the histories of dozens of restaurants from T-Town's past — family sagas, culinary wonders, beloved diners, edge-of-town favorites, popular hang-outs, and more. It's a book that's sure to appeal to those who can lip-smackingly recall the likes of Pennington's, Shotgun Sam's, Villa Venice, The Golden Drumstick, The

Handel's Messiah at Saint John's Church

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing a special presentation of George Frideric Handel's Messiah. The beloved Baroque-era masterwork — a timeless holiday favorite — will be presented this coming Saturday and Sunday, the 8th and 9th, at Saint John's Church in Tulsa (at 4200 South Atlanta Place). Our guests are the special visiting conductor for this concert, Timothy Brown, and the organist and choirmaster at Saint John's, Joseph Arndt. Both Brown (who is the retired Director of Music

A Discussion with Hilary Mantel, Winner of the Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award

Our guest on ST is the celebrated British writer Hilary Mantel, who is the newest recipient of the Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, which is given annually by the Tulsa Library Trust. Mantel is the author of several books, including the historical novels "Wolf Hall" and "Bring Up the Bodies," which both recount the life of Thomas Cromwell, the "political fixer" best known for his tenure in the court of Henry VIII. Mantel speaks with us about these and other of her very popular

A Discussion with Hilary Mantel, Winner of the Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award

ST Medical Monday: "Tumor" by Anna Leahy

Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears. A blend of science, journalism, and deeply

Coming to Terms with Our Terms for Tulsa's Past: A New Name for a Key Commission

Our guest is State Senator Kevin Matthews, who recently held a press conference to announce that the name of the 1921 Race Riot Commission has been officially changed to the 1921 Race Massacre Commission. As Matthews, who chairs this Commission , noted at the conference: "The fact that it was called a riot was one of the reasons given for turning down insurance claims, and it has been offensive to many in the affected area for 97 years. After being made aware of the significance of the term, the

Coming to Terms with Our Terms for Tulsa's Past: A New Name for a Key Commission

"The Immeasurable World: Journeys in Desert Places" (Encore Broadcast)

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is the award-winning British author and journalist William Atkins, whose latest book — a dense and engrossing blend of history, memoir, geography, and travel writing — is called "The Immeasurable World: Journeys in Desert Places." It's a work that, per The Wall Street Journal, "courts comparisons with the capaciously learned nature writing of John McPhee. But there's also an open-ended spiritual quest to Mr. Atkins's sojourns,

"Letters from Max: A Book of Friendship"

Our guest is the noted playwright, Sarah Ruhl, a Tony Award nominee and the author of "100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write," which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She tells us about her newest book, a collection of moving and insightful letters between herself and Max Ritvo (1990-2016). Ruhl teaches at the Yale School of drama, and Ritvo — a noted poet who died young of cancer — had been one of her favorite students. As was noted of "Letters from Max" in a starred review in

"Love Can Be: A Literary Collection about Our Animals"

Our guest is Teresa Miller, the local author and Director Emerita of the Center for Poets and Writers at OSU. Miller is also the co-editor of a new anthology, which she tells us about: "Love Can Be: A Literary Collection about Our Animals." It's a gathering of about thirty acclaimed authors, all of them celebrating pets, animals, creatures, and other forms of life: cats, birds, frogs, butterflies, bears, dogs, raccoons, horses, etc. As Miller tells us, all net proceeds of sales of this volume of

An Arm and a Leg — A New Podcast Focused on the Cost of Health Care

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dan Weissmann, a veteran radio reporter for outlets like Marketplace, 99 Percent Invisible, Planet Money, and Chicago's WBEZ. He joins us to talk about his new podcast, An Arm and a Leg, which focuses on the cost of health care in the U.S. Weissmann is the host and executive producer of this podcast, which just launched earlier this month. As noted at the Arm and a Leg website: "Health care — and how much it costs — is scary. But you're not

ST Presents Museum Confidential: The World-Famous Crochet Museum

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we offer another edition of our ongoing Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice monthly by Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time around, MC visits California's High Desert with its roving correspondent, Preston Poe (of The Preston Poe Show podcast ). As we often say, there are many kinds of museums.... One of them is a tiny, refurbished photo-processing booth located in Joshua Tree, which is now dedicated entirely to crochet.

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