KCRW's To the Point Hosted by Warren Olney, To the Point is a fast-paced, news based one-hour daily national program that focuses on the hot-button issues of the day, co-produced by KCRW and Public Radio International. Featuring three discrete segments - Newsmaker, Main Topic, Reporter's Notebook - To the Point presents informative and thought-provoking back-and-forth discussion. A mix of guests cover a range of concerns - politics, international affairs, technology, the environment - the front-page stories that attract a savvy news audience. Olney and his talented team of producers understand that the key to a good program is casting. With one of the richest rollodexes in broadcasting, the producers spend considerable time and effort selecting the guests. The line-up is constructed to juxtapose ideas that illuminate the issue. Olney gets to the point with hard-hitting questions that advance the story. He keeps the pace of the program fast and exciting. And the result is smart, relevant radio.
KCRW's To the Point

KCRW's To the Point

From KCRW

Hosted by Warren Olney, To the Point is a fast-paced, news based one-hour daily national program that focuses on the hot-button issues of the day, co-produced by KCRW and Public Radio International. Featuring three discrete segments - Newsmaker, Main Topic, Reporter's Notebook - To the Point presents informative and thought-provoking back-and-forth discussion. A mix of guests cover a range of concerns - politics, international affairs, technology, the environment - the front-page stories that attract a savvy news audience. Olney and his talented team of producers understand that the key to a good program is casting. With one of the richest rollodexes in broadcasting, the producers spend considerable time and effort selecting the guests. The line-up is constructed to juxtapose ideas that illuminate the issue. Olney gets to the point with hard-hitting questions that advance the story. He keeps the pace of the program fast and exciting. And the result is smart, relevant radio.

Most Recent Episodes

Gerrymandering and the US Census put the Supreme Court in the "Political Thicket"

Decisions on the census and political gerrymandering are an opportunity for the Supreme Court's conservative majority. Together, they could help consolidate Republican power for years to come. It's being called a test for Chief Justice John Roberts' claim that the Court is beyond partisanship. One way or the other, the impact will be felt in Congress and in next year's election.

Gerrymandering and the US Census put the Supreme Court in the "Political Thicket"

Climate change and the constitutional right to a livable future

Four years ago 21 young Americans came up with a new legal theory: the Constitution protects their right to a livable future. Last week, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments that federal policy has violated their right for 50 years by supporting and subsidizing fossil fuels. The result could be a trial and an order for the government to come up with a remedy. We'll hear about 4 years of judicial action from a reporter and the plaintiffs' attorney. A leader of youthful activists describes a nationwide movement for action.

Does Roe v. Wade have a future?

Since Roe v. Wade and the legalization of abortion in 1973, the pro-life movement has not made it easy for women seeking access to an abortion clinic. An abortion escort is often needed to get past protesters. We'll hear firsthand what that's like. Now the battle over a woman's constitutional right has moved from the streets to red-state legislatures and President Trump is seizing the moment.

California Democrats and the Presidential Nomination

California's March primary is early enough to help winnow the list of two dozen candidates. Hard on the heels of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, it offers a huge trove of delegates to the nominating convention. But they're awarded proportionally; it's not winner-take-all. And the biggest state in the union is also the most expensive for political campaigns. We'll look at the opportunities and the challenges.

Can Trump Revoke Climate Science?

Despite record storms, fires and flooding, federal agencies are being asked to ignore--and even deny--climate change. Methods for measuring public health risks are being discarded. While greenhouse gas regulations are being repealed, government subsidies continue to generate fossil fuels. Gina McCarthy led the EPA under Obama. We'll discuss the danger of abandoning evidence-based science and how hard it will be to recover.

The Supreme Court and Partisan Politics

Senate confirmation hearings on Supreme Court nominations have become guaranteed partisan battlegrounds. Michael Kirk calls it "the politics of destruction." He's the much-awarded director of "Supreme Revenge," a documentary aptly titled to describe what's happening. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is described as an architect of the current Court now led by Chief Justice John Roberts. McConnell and other Republicans hope to see the last of civil rights rulings orchestrated by the late Chief Justice Earl Warren.

Should 'Climate Change' be 'Climate Crisis?'

Led by the Columbia Journalism Review, the Nation and the Guardian, environmental journalists are accusing their own profession of being "complacent while the world burns." They say wildfires, floods and other disasters are too often reported without reference to what science says they mean for the future. Both "happy talk news" on local TV and major newspapers are driven by "the brutal demands of ratings and money." Instead of "sleepwalking us toward disaster," they need to awaken, inform, and rouse the people to action."

Does the Trump White House want war with Iran?

Iraq is accused of various provocations, and American ships and bombers are being sent to the Middle East. The consensus is that neither side wants war. But, National Security Advisor John Bolton did advocate bombing Iran before he joined the Trump White House, and the president has exchanged dire threats with Iranian leaders. The escalated rhetoric is confusing, and there's a lot at stake for US allies in Europe. They're still part of the nuclear deal Trump withdrew from; Iran wants their help in dealing with economic sanctions, and they have to maintain their business ties to the US.

The climate change candidate: Washington State Governor Jay Inslee

There are almost two dozen Democrats hoping to become the presidential nominee. They run the gamut in age and experience. They're also running on a gamut of issues, from health care to corporate power, foreign policy, race relations and internet privacy. But one candidate is insisting that there's only one issue that matters: climate change. Washington State Governor Jay Inslee isn't trying to make things simple. Instead, he's arguing that climate change will impact everything needed for human life as we know it: food, water, shelter, the land, the air, and the oceans. He says he's "the only candidate who has said from day one that this has to be job one for the United States." His ambitious plans calls for phasing out coal by 2030 and having "100 percent clean cars beginning in 2031." There's no alternative, he says, calling climate change a crisis of "existential threats to our health and our security." Inslee also suggests some practical first steps to make it easier for Washington to legislate on climate change--like eliminating the filibuster in the US Senate, "We cannot allow Mitch McConnell to weaponize this antebellum artifact of a bygone age to stop our ability to fight the climate crisis." He says that in the '"60s Kennedy said we could go to the moon, in the '40s we rallied together to beat fascism." Inslee says that we need that spark of inspiration of someone who believes in the American people, and that with the right leadership, America is capable of beating the climate crisis.

The powers of Congress vs Trump's executive privilege

There's evidence in the Mueller report that President Trump committed obstruction of justice. That's according to more than 700 former state and federal prosecutors, who committed themselves in writing. But the Justice Department says a president can't be charged with a crime. So Congress is using its power of oversight to try digging further. In response, the White House is claiming executive privilege and the power of the "unitary executive." Court actions are already under way, and there's always the possibility of impeachment.

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